Maria Perez

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    • Member Type(s): Content Publisher
      Expert
      Communications Professional
      Media - Freelancer
      Media - Broadcast
      Media - Print Journalist
      Media - Student Journalist
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    • Title:Director, Audience Content
    • Organization:ProfNet
    • Area of Expertise:ProfNet
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    Journalist Spotlight: Karen Appold, Freelance Journalist

    Tuesday, January 3, 2017, 9:14 AM [Journalist Spotlight]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    In our Journalist Spotlight Q&A series, PR Newswire for Journalists and ProfNet users share their insight and advice on how PR professionals and experts can improve communications and increase their chances of being featured in their publications.

    In this edition, we catch up with award-winning journalist Karen Appold.

    Based in Lehigh Valley, Pa., Appold earned a B.A. in English (writing) from Pennsylvania State University, and has more than 20 years of editorial experience. She has owned an editorial business, Write Now Services, since 2003, and works with an extensive range of nonprofit organizations, businesses, and media.

    For those not familiar with your work, can you tell us a little about the topics you cover?

    I write for trade publications in a variety of medical specialties and cover the healthcare industry for managed healthcare executives. I also write about retail for trade publications in the gift shop industry.

    You’ve used ProfNet for a long time, so I’m sure you've gotten a lot of replies to your queries over the years. What are PR pros doing right – and what are they getting wrong?

    It’s helpful when PR people respond with a source suggestion and include their employment details or a link to their bio. I usually can’t use sources from vendors, and it’s not always clear if someone is a vendor, so PR people should be upfront about that.

    Is there anything PR reps can do to set themselves apart from other respondents?

    Fast responses to my request, and offering sources who can answer questions via email.

    Are you open to cold calls/pitches?

    No, not unless I have a post looking for article ideas for a specific publication.

    Do you use social media, either to connect with people or to promote your articles?

    I’m on LinkedIn.

    What’s your favorite or most memorable story you’ve written?

    An article featuring an auctioneer -- which I won a Keystone Press Award for.

    Anything else you’d like to add?

    I really value the service that ProfNet provides. I’ve received hundreds of great sources from it.

    Journalist Spotlight: Amanda Baltazar, Freelance Journalist

    Tuesday, December 13, 2016, 12:30 PM [Journalist Spotlight]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    In our Journalist Spotlight Q&A series, PR Newswire for Journalists and ProfNet users share their insight and advice on how PR professionals and experts can improve communications and increase their chances of being featured in their publications.

    In this edition, we catch up with Amanda Baltazar, a freelance writer for a variety of trade publications.

    Amanda writes about nearly everything -- except perhaps politics. A few of her trade and industry specialties include restaurants, food, beverages, retail, and health. She also writes essays for consumer publications. You can view more about her on her website: www.chaterink.com.

    Amanda, for those not familiar with your work, can you tell us a little about the topics you cover?

    I write almost exclusively for B2B magazines, focusing on food/beverages/restaurants/bars and retail.

    You’ve used ProfNet for a long time, so I’m sure you've gotten a lot of replies to your queries over the years. What are PR pros doing right – and what are they getting wrong?

    There’s not really a formula for this, but when PRs write to ask who I’m writing for, I don’t have the time to write back if I’ve been inundated with responses, so that may lose them a placement for that article.

    Some PRs take too long in their initial email to get to the information I need, with paragraphs of irrelevant detail before actually answering my pitch; and some don’t provide enough information for me to figure out if the pitch is relevant.

    On the plus side, some PRs seem to read my mind and send the perfect amount of detail, and are to the point. They even include links in case I need to research more before contacting them back.

    Another winner is when PRs say they can put me in touch with their client within X number of days (or whatever) so I’m confident they’ll actually come through, and some go above and beyond, offering up their client who also knows a certain other person that they could probably get on the phone, too.

    Is there anything PRs can do to set themselves apart from other respondents?

    Follow-ups help. Sometimes I go through my responses and contact the five (or however many) PRs for sources, but at some point one or more may fall through. If someone happens to follow up at around that time, I may just contact that PR rather than rake through the whole list again. The offer of artwork can often seal a deal, too.

    Are you open to cold calls/pitches? If so, what are your guidelines for those?

    No, I’m not a fan of these because I am never short of material for story ideas.

    Do you use social media, either to connect with people or to promote your articles?

    No, but I have a personal list of sources I sometimes contact for stories.

    What’s your favorite or most memorable story you’ve written?

    I don’t have a favorite but I do have favorite sources, who I have developed a relationship with over years. Or other sources that I have just met and we have an amazing conversation. As someone who works from home, those connections go a long way towards making this job memorable.

    Anything else you’d like to add about how sources can best work with you?

    Every now and then a source is a dud and it’s usually not because he or she doesn’t know their topic. They just can’t explain it. I had this happen recently and I was pretty sure the guy had some fascinating things to tell me about his kitchen but I just couldn’t get the details out of him and ended up not including him in the story. I asked the PR for someone else from the restaurant, but unfortunately he was unable to make it happen. The key is for PRs to make sure their source is personable and can speak eloquently about the topic.

    ProfNet Journalist Spotlight: Finance and Investment Writer Lou Carlozo

    Wednesday, August 31, 2016, 2:31 PM [Journalist Spotlight]
    0 (0 Ratings)


    In our Journalist Spotlight Q&A series, ProfNet users share insight and advice on how PR professionals and experts can improve communications and increase their chances of being featured in their publications.

    Lou Carlozo (@LouCarlozo63) is the managing editor at BAI, a nonprofit organization based in Chicago that works within banking and the financial services industry.

    An award-winning journalist based in Chicago, Carlozo spent 16 years with the Chicago Tribune, where he served as a syndicated weekly features columnist, writing coach, music editor and critic, and the creator of “The Recession Diaries.” He was also a former managing editor for AOL’s personal finance site and a full-time freelance contributor for Reuters and U.S. News & World Report.

    Lou, for those not familiar with your work, can you talk a little about some of the publications you write for and the topics you cover?

    I just started work as the managing editor at BAI (Bank Administration Institute). I also continue to freelance for U.S. News & World Report covering investment, and I’m the stocks expert for About.com, which has just launched as an exciting new financial website, The Balance.

    You’ve used ProfNet for many years, starting back when you were on staff with the Tribune, so you've gotten a lot of replies to your queries over the years. What are PR pros doing right – and what are they getting wrong?

    The pros who get it right build relationships with me, and vice versa. Relationships drive everything we do in media, so it isn’t just answering one query. It’s letting me know more about who they are, whom they represent and what we can do to help each other. I’ve made no bones about the fact that publicists help me do the job every day.

    As for the cons, there aren’t many. It’s sometimes hard when publicists are insistent about “can you tell me if this article ran, and where can I find it?” That’s hard for me to chase down 10 times a day. Also, I can’t tell you how many times PR people don’t read the queries close enough. If I ask for comments specifically via email, that doesn’t mean dropping everything to do a 45-minute phoner.

    Is there anything PR reps can do to set themselves apart from other respondents?

    Absolutely. Don’t settle for one answered query. If a reporter is open to it, check in once a week to see what they’re working on. Additionally, I’ve had some PR people volunteer to help me with a deadline, even if they didn’t have a client in their stable. I can’t even begin to express how much that wins my loyalty. Their sources get top priority the next time around.

    Also, get to know the reporter as a flesh-and-blood person with a life outside of journalism. Some of the PR pros I’ve dealt with have become trusted friends and guides, and I know something of their character and work ethic from what they share about their lives outside the office. Be warm. Have a sense of humor. Be persistent but polite. And understand the view from the journalist’s side: massive deadlines, massive amounts of coffee, stress often around the clock. To the extent you can say, “How can I serve and help?” you’ll win connections for life.

    Are you open to cold calls/pitches? If so, what are your guidelines for those?

    Yes. Send me email (loucarlozo63@gmail.com), and help me understand why this story is something that is in my wheelhouse, and why it matters. If you know and research my work ahead of time, it shows me that you have a true understanding of what works for me, and that I’m not just a “pitch target."

    Do you use social media at all, either to connect with people or to promote your articles? If so, how? If not, why not?

    I’m a “superuser” on LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com/in/loucarlozo), with more than 2,500 first-level connections and counting -- conservatively, that’s 2.5 million people I’m two handshakes away from. I will sometimes post my own blogs, stories and story requests there, and on Facebook as well.

    With LinkedIn, though, it’s not merely about numbers. I always try to introduce myself to a new connection and let them know I’m open to working together. Never send a connection request with “I’d like to join your professional network on Linkedin.” Make the note personal; show that you have an appreciation and knowledge of the work they do, and that you’re willing to help them. This has led to some of the best freelance assignments I’ve ever had, and lasting friendships. “Friend” can be a dirty word among journalism’s ethics wonks, but most of us are mature to understand that it’s not about shilling for each other: It’s helping each other.

    What’s been your favorite or most memorable story you’ve written?

    Picking a favorite is always difficult; there have been so many. If I had to pick a few on the opposite ends of the spectrum, I profiled a Chicago mother who lost her world in a single accidental gunshot: Her toddler daughter was killed, and her husband went to jail. I won a shared Polk Award for my stories in that series. I also broke a major story for Reuters highlighting how the U.S. has the largest college dropout rate in the world. To pin down the key final numbers, I had to contact the author of a report while he was on a plane.

    On the funny end, I once interviewed Barney the Dinosaur for my nationally syndicated DVD column at the Chicago Tribune. Of course, it was the voice of Barney, but the publicist kept insisting it was the real Barney, and they wanted me to play along. The voice guy refused to identify himself as anything other than Barney. So I tried to grill him about being too facile for kids, and he responded, “You have to pardon me if I’m nervous; it’s hard to do interviews after 100 million years.” I also am the only journalist in history that’s ever appeared in an Archie cartoon -- right up there with winning a Pulitzer. If you go to my Facebook page, the first frame of the Archie cartoon is there. They made me look less balding than I am.

    Whether you’re a journalist looking for experts, or an expert looking to be quoted, ProfNet can help. Sign up as a source at www.profnet.com, or click here to send a query as a journalist: prn.to/2bCdhgU.