Laura Anthony

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    • Member Type(s): Expert
    • Title:Founding Partner
    • Organization:Legal & Compliance, LLC
    • Area of Expertise:Securities Law
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The New SEC Guidance On Cybersecurity
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Uploaded By: Laura Anthony, Esq.
Date Added: March 29, 2018
Description: The New SEC Guidance on Cybersecurity- Today is the first in a LawCast series talking about the new SEC guidance on cybersecurity. On February 20, 2018, the SEC issued new interpretative guidance on public company disclosures related to cybersecurity risks and incidents. In addition to addressing public company disclosures, the new guidance reminds companies of the importance of maintaining disclosure controls and procedures to address cyber-risks and incidents and reminds insiders that trading while having non-public information related to cyber-matters could violate federal insider-trading laws. The new guidance is not dramatically different from the 2011 guidance. The topic of cybersecurity has been in the forefront in recent years, with the SEC issuing a series of statements and creating two new cyber-based enforcement initiatives targeting the protection of retail investors, including protection related to distributed ledger technology (DLT) and initial coin or cryptocurrency offerings (ICO’s). The SEC has also asked the House Committee on Financial Services to increase the SEC’s budget by $100 million to enhance the SEC’s cybersecurity efforts. The SEC incorporates cybersecurity considerations in its disclosure and supervisory programs, including in the context of its review of public company disclosures, its oversight of critical market technology infrastructure, and its oversight of other regulated entities, including broker-dealers, investment advisors and investment companies. Considering rapidly changing technology and the proliferation of cybersecurity incidents affecting both private and public companies (including a hacking of the SEC’s own EDGAR system and a hacking of Equifax causing a loss of $5 billion in market cap upon disclosure), threats and risks, public companies have been anticipating a needed update on the SEC disclosure-related guidance. SEC Commissioner Kara Stein’s statement on the new guidance is grim on the subject, pointing out that the risks and costs of cyberattacks have been growing and could result in devastating and long-lasting collateral affects. Commissioner Stein cites a Forbes article estimating that cyber-crime will cost businesses approximately $6 trillion per year on average through 2021 and an Accenture article citing a 62% increase in such costs over the last five years. Commissioner Stein also discusses the inadequacy of the 2011 guidance in practice and her pessimism that the new guidance will properly fix the issue. She notes that most disclosures are boilerplate and do not provide meaningful information to investors despite the large increase in the number and sophistication of, and damaged caused by, cyberattacks on public companies in recent years. Commissioner Stein includes a list of requirements that she would have liked to see in the new guidance, including, for example, a discussion of the value to investors of disclosing whether any member of a company’s board of directors has experience, education, expertise or familiarity with cybersecurity matters or risks. I have read numerous media articles and blogs related to the disclosure of cyber-matters in SEC reports. One such blog was written by Kevin LaCroix and published in the D&O Diary. Mr. LaCroix’s blog points out that according to a September 19, 2016, Wall Street Journal article, cyber-attacks are occurring more frequently than ever but are rarely reported. The article cites a report that reviewed the filings of 9,000 public companies from 2010 to the present and found that only 95 of these companies had informed the SEC of a data breach.
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