Evelyn Tipacti

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    • Title:Community Editor
    • Organization:ProfNet Connect (PR Newswire)
    • Area of Expertise:Media Relations, Hispanic Media
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    Media 411: Revealing Confidential Sources

    Friday, December 13, 2013, 10:24 AM [General]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Imagine writing an investigative story with confidential sources only to be told you have to reveal your sources or go to jail.  Yeah, it happened to Jana Winter of Fox News and she was told earlier this week she does not have to reveal them, after all.

    A New York based journalist, Winter was subpoenaed to appear in a Colorado court to reveal the identities of law enforcement officials who gave her information about the case of the gunman who killed 12 people at a midnight showing of “Batman” at a theater in Aurora, CO in July of 2012. These law enforcement officials were promised confidentiality after telling her the mass murderer had sent a notebook to a psychiatrist at the University of Colorado indicating he was going to kill people and how he would do so. Winter vowed to go to jail rather than reveal her sources.

    Winter was based in New York where the state’s shield law protects journalists from having to reveal their confidential sources regardless of the state in which they go to gather their information.

    Without a doubt, this is a huge win for journalists and journalism. If a reporter cannot do their job to inform the public when they are given sensitive information by confidential sources, then it limits what the public can be told because of fear of possible jail time. The shield law exists in most states and varies accordingly, but New York’s seems to offer the most protection to the journalists based there.

    What do you think? Should Winter have been forced to divulge her sources?

    For more information on this story, please click here.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    Dashes, Airing 911 Calls and Instagram Marketing: Last Week's Top Blogs

    Monday, December 9, 2013, 12:33 PM [General]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    If you haven’t checked out the Blogs section of ProfNet Connect lately, you’re missing out on some really great posts. Here’s a link to some of last week’s most popular blog posts:

    Grammar Hammer: Drawing a Line in the Sand
    Coming from the world of the wire where, up until a few years ago, I didn’t really care what type of dash you used. We used to transmit everything in ASCII text, so it didn’t matter to me if it was an em-dash, an en-dash, or a hyphen. By the time I was done with it, it was just a dash. I can appreciate the subtle nuances and function of each of them now, but admit I do miss the days when there just wasn’t another option. A dash was a dash.
    bit.ly/1kk0dFJ

    Do Newswire Services Work? PR Newswire Does.
    Across the U.S. -- and the rest of the planet, for that matter -- thousands of media outlets devote technical resource and computer space to receiving PR Newswire press releases. We know the technical and newsroom contacts at each outlet, and we work with them to tailor the news feed to fit the outlet’s needs.
    In addition to the news feeds that are hardwired into newsrooms as described above, more than 30,000 credentialed journalists and bloggers access PR Newswire for Journalists each month, where they tally more than a million press release views monthly.
    bit.ly/1d52n9u

    SMCNYC Recap: Are Marketers Becoming Publishers?
    With the emergence of the Internet, multimedia and new concepts of storytelling, marketing and publishing are beginning to merge. Marketers no longer just sell a product, but rather create brands and use storytelling in order to emotionally connect with customers, in turn creating lifelong users as opposed to one-time buyers. Social Media Club of New York recently took up this topic in order to better understand this developing trend. 
    bit.ly/ICEwEi

    Media 411: Airing 911 Calls
    Airing 911 calls is becoming more common during newscasts but do they do any good to the general public? As we approach the one year commemoration of the Sandy Hook school shootings, it makes the topic ever more relevant.
    bit.ly/1dSVvkG

    Business Journalism Online: A Wake-up Call to Traditional Media
    In a recent post on BusinessJournalism.org, the Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism’s online resource for writers, a journalist shares a list of websites that are doing business journalism the right way, including Wonkblog, Mathbabe, Economist’s View, and Econbrowser.
    bit.ly/19hczcn

    An Unfiltered Guide to Instagram Marketing
    Last week we hosted a #ConnectChat with Jason Miles (@mrjasonmiles), author of “Instagram Power” and co-founder of Liberty Jane Clothing (Instagram:@LibertyJaneClothing). During the chat he provided his own tried-and-true tips for any business who wants to utilize Instagram as a valuable marketing platform. 
    bit.ly/18ofP5E

    Media Databases: A Valuable Research Tool in the Right Hands
    A good PR professional will have a clear understanding of who they are reaching out to before an email is written or a phone number is dialed. That is how it should work and I think there are a lot of good PR people out there who do just that. They’re the successful ones who actually build relationships with the media.
    Unfortunately people don’t always use their tools correctly. They don’t always measure twice before emailing.
    bit.ly/1d54hap

    The Q&A Team: How to Never Run Out of Blog Post Ideas
    I manage a blog and post to it on a daily basis. Recently, I have been struggling to come up with fresh new ideas for the blog. Do you have any tips for how I can ensure that I will always have a blog post idea handy? Are there any websites/places I can for inspiration? Can I utilize any of my old posts for future posts?
    bit.ly/18fp37g

    Blog Notes: Caregiving and Beauty Product Blogs
    November is National Family Caregiver Awareness Month. Blogs like Caregiving Cafe Blog helps readers with "updates and useful tidbits" on caregiving tasks. 
    bit.ly/1jicY5K

    Influential Media Outlets That Used ProfNet in November
    ProfNet has been helping journalists and experts connect for more than 20 years. In that time, we have seen queries from just about every type of outlet imaginable – from newspapers and magazines to radio shows and blogs. And while the media times are always changing, there are still a great many stories being written, and writers still need expert sources.
    bit.ly/1kas8aO

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    Upcoming Events for PR/Media Pros

    Friday, December 6, 2013, 3:01 PM [Upcoming Events]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    We regularly update our ProfNet Connect calendar to include upcoming events we think will be of interest to PR and media professionals. Here are a few events coming up over the next few weeks:

    Event: NY Press Club Foundation Holiday Party
    Host: New York Press Club
    Date: Dec. 9
    Location: New York
    Summary: Our Holiday Party, an annual charitable event hosted by the New York Press Club Foundation for the benefit of disadvantaged city kids, returns to the Yale Club this year.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Do’s and Don’ts of Self-Publishing
    Host: ASJA
    Date: Dec. 10
    Location: New York
    Summary: Are you thinking about self-publishing for the first time? Don't make these common mistakes that most authors make. Miral Sattar, CEO of BiblioCrunch.com will go over the ins and outs of self-publishing and help you create your publishing checklist to make sure you put out the best book possible.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Social Media Marketing for Professional Services Leadership Forum
    Host: Business Development Institute
    Date: Dec. 10
    Location: New York
    Summary: Speakers will share case studies and lessons learned from leading firms about how they use social media and content marketing to highlight expertise, build new business and expand relationships with existing clients.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Holiday Mixer
    Host: PubClub/PRSA Boston
    Date: Dec. 11
    Location: Boston
    Summary: This is a joint holiday mixer with PubClub and PRSA Boston.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Celebrate the Holidays
    Host: PRSA Westchester/Fairfield
    Date: Dec. 12
    Location: Stamford, CT
    SummaryEnjoy live jazz music along with plenty of food and festive beverages.  Chat with old friends and make new ones. 
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Visual Social Communications Leadership Forum
    Host: Business Development Institute
    Date: Dec. 12
    Location: New York
    Summary: This forum will demonstrate how leading brands are harnessing images and platforms such as Instagram and Pinterest to break through the clutter to reach their audience.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: The LA Show (Social TV)
    Host: Lost Remote 
    Date: Dec. 13
    Location: Los Angeles
    SummaryJoin us to gain practical insight and actionable advice from creative tactics on engaging viewers to case studies on capitalizing on the second screen. Gather perspective from top thinkers at NBC News, Fox Broadcasting, Syfy, Roku, Sling Media, Mass Relevance, and Facebook.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: The Digital Engagement
    Host: ASJA
    Date: Dec. 17
    Location: New York
    Summary: Digital content is the new zeitgeist in B-to-C and B-to-B communication today. This panel provides insights into this new world and how writers can address the challenges it presents. Learn the skills you need to write slide shows, video scripts and other digital content.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Free Holiday Party and Networking Event
    Host: NJ CAMA
    Date: Dec. 18
    Location: Princeton, N.J.
    Summary: Business networking and holiday cheer will come together as the New Jersey Communications, Advertising and Marketing Association (NJ CAMA) hosts its annual holiday party.
    Complete event info here.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    Media 411: Airing 911 Calls

    Thursday, December 5, 2013, 3:06 PM [Media 411]
    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    Airing 911 calls is becoming more common during newscasts but do they do any good to the general public? As we approach the one year commemoration of the Sandy Hook school shootings, it makes the topic ever more relevant.

    The 911 tapes were released on   Wednesday but do we really want to listen to them? Better yet, do we need to listen to them? Do they serve a purpose other than to relive a tragedy that still resonates in the minds of parents who send their kids off to school each day and to those who experienced it firsthand? The horror of that day need not be recalled and news networks and local news teams need to be keenly aware of the impact airing such calls could bring.

    In certain instances airing a 911 call can be beneficial in that it can help clear up any confusion regarding a certain event. The George Zimmerman case comes to mind as it was absolutely crucial to know what was said in the 911 calls after they came into question. Such calls can also help confirm if a dispatcher is behaving inappropriately which can lead to disciplinary action if there’s proof  any actions or lack thereof, may have impeded the timely arrival of emergency crews. This is good use of airing a 911 call. 

    Sandy Hook, on the other hand, seems pointless, but this is just my opinion. As a parent, it’s one of the worst scenarios you could ever face and hearing the 911 calls from that day just doesn’t seem to do anything but provide macabre audio. We know what happened. That’s more than enough.

    If your newsroom is discussing whether or not to air the Sandy Hook 911 calls, ask yourselves if it’s really news and if it offers any public benefit. If the only comments your reporters or anchors can make after airing clips is "just awful" or something to that effect, yes, we already know that day was "awful," but their saying it doesn't add anything to the story.

    What happened on December 14, 2012 was news and part of history, but the actual calls are not helping anyone. They were important a year ago, but not today.

    What's your take?

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    Media 411: Interns Who Sue

    Wednesday, November 27, 2013, 1:37 PM [Media 411]
    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    Internships are a coveted part of a college student’s life, a hope that with such an experience an even better opportunity will come along in their field of study.

    These days, however, some internship programs are under scrutiny by students for not giving them at least a minimum wage salary and for being assigned what they feel are tasks without educational benefit. Students are going as far as SUING these media giants as a result of their unsatisfying experience.

    Just recently Condé Nast announced the   elimination of their internship program, meaning students will no longer run errands and do research at publications like Vogue and Vanity Fair -- a huge blow for students hoping to get a foot in the door at one of the most prestigious fashion magazines in the country. All of this as a result of two unhappy interns who made the decision to sue Condé Nast for not paying them minimum wage.

    This isn’t the first case of interns suing their “employer.” Last year an intern at Hearst’s Harper’s Bazaar sued the publication for making her work 55-hours a week without pay.

    There are always two sides to a story and every person’s experience with an internship will be different from another intern, even at the same outlet. The experience from an intern’s perspective can be either one as the glass half full or the glass half empty. There’s the acceptance that an internship is known to be a low-paying opportunity to get firsthand experience at a company and realize it’s something worth the sacrifice.

    The other perspective is that of an intern who feels belittled at the menial tasks they’re made to perform without pay for very long hours. Not to say some interns aren’t treated well because certainly, there are situations where some assignments really may seem completely ridiculous at the helm of superiors who abuse their authority. While it may be part of what comes with being an intern, if the main responsibilities given to an intern really are demeaning or not related to their field at all, then a company needs to revamp the internship program and carefully vet those who supervise interns.

    Unfortunately, there are people who take advantage of the interns whose only desire is to learn how their field really operates and not get crushed in the process. Not all internships are like that. Many (if not most) companies try to provide an atmosphere that’s conducive to learning and making interns feel comfortable. Is it possible that some industries may also just be more prevalent to not treating interns fairly?

    Quite frankly, suing doesn’t seem to be the answer with regards to internships. Legal action against a colossal company seems a bit ridiculous when you always have the option of quitting an internship. No one is forcing an intern to stay and don’t most people know that internships are unpaid (in some states like New York there are laws that don’t allow employees to work without pay even if they’ve consented) and require long hours? For every person who says they got “nothing” out of it, there’s someone who got plenty from it. The demise of these internship programs is not a good thing and students can always decide whether or not an internship will fit their financial and educational needs.

    Both sides can learn from this now in some way – companies can perhaps pay minimum wage or a fair stipend with reasonable work hours and students can be more selective in choosing an internship. There’s always a choice.

    For more information about this topic, please click here and here for the articles used to help create this post.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.


    SPOTLIGHT: Carmen Cusido, Wildlife Conservation Society

    Monday, November 25, 2013, 2:11 PM [Spotlight]
    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    Welcome to our SPOTLIGHT feature, where we highlight a journalist to share their personal story and insight with you.

    This SPOTLIGHT belongs to Carmen Cusido, an associate writer for the Wildlife Conservation Society. Carmen worked in journalism for 11 years, reporting for The Times of Trenton and The Charlotte Observer in addition to The Daily Targum and others.

    We hope you find SPOTLIGHT both enjoyable and informative.

    Carmen, please tell me about you and your role at the Wildlife Conservation Society.

    I began my career as an associate writer for the Wildlife Conservation Society in February 2013. My office is actually based at the Bronx Zoo, and it’s pretty remarkable to be able to see some of the exhibits during lunch. But even though our headquarters are in New York, we have scientists helping to save wildlife and wild places, and in general doing important work throughout the world.

    Some of my responsibilities at WCS include translating messaging from English to Spanish, writing narratives for our annual reports and other printed materials, and developing op-eds and letters-to-the-editor with senior conservationists. We have a great communications team, and I’ve always felt I could ask any of my colleagues for guidance as I transitioned from reporting to public relations work. Needless to say, I love what I do and the people I work with. 


    Did you know you wanted to be a journalist as a child or did the idea come to you later on?


    As a young girl, my parents would bring me different Spanish-language newspapers and encourage me to read to them (one of them was El Diario La Prensa). We didn’t have too many Spanish-language children’s books around when I was a kid, so my parents who try to find the most age-appropriate articles for me to read and discuss with them. It was important to them to teach me about civic engagement. They left Cuba in the 1960s for political reasons, and were always fascinated by our First Amendment rights and the fact that an average citizen could write a letter to the editor or attend a protest. That’s what whetted my interest in journalism. 

    My passion for writing was solidified at 16, when I began taking journalism and drama classes with my late high school teacher, Jack O’Connor. Jack always pushed me to write better stories, ask better questions, and not get discouraged. “Carmen, this paragraph is too long. This quote doesn’t make sense. What angles can you take with these stories?” he would ask.  He was a mentor and a friend. It was through Jack that I learned about Columbia University’s School of Journalism, and it became my life’s goal to attend the school. I can now say I’m a proud 2010 graduate of The Journalism School. I enjoy speaking to students at Union City High School’s Career Day every March in New Jersey– it’s a way for me to honor Jack’s legacy by returning to my alma mater but it’s also a way for me to give back to young students. 

    Where was your first job in journalism?

    My first job in journalism was as an editor for The Daily Targum, the award-winning college newspaper at Rutgers University, where I earned by bachelor’s degree. The Targum where I got my first taste and love of politics, and writing about political issues. In my three years as a reporter and editor there, I traveled to Washington, D.C., to cover an affirmative-action protest, to Trenton to interview students fighting budget cuts, and to Boston to cover the 2004 presidential campaign. In fact, one of the highlights of my three and a half years at The

    Targum was heading to Boston with a staff photographer to cover Election Day in 2004. I ran into the late Sen. Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts, and heard John Edwards speak to a group of supporters later that night. It was an honor to both blog about the Republican National Convention that year in New York City and be at a Democratic gathering in Boston watching Election night returns and interviewing people. 

    In the years since, I have interviewed delegates to the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte in 2012, cancer survivors, political and religious leaders, a beekeeper who loved his hobby and teachers who encouraged their students to raise funds for a local food bank. The longest journalism job I’ve had was the four years I spent at The Times of Trenton.  While there, I acquired great editors and mentors like Toni, Brian and Peter who encouraged me to let my curiosity lead me to better stories.  
     
    What type of stories do you usually cover?


    When I worked as a reporter, I typically covered everything from county news and immigration to religion and education. My mother is a retired teacher who’d worked in the Jersey City Public School system in New Jersey for about 25 years. Needless to say, I enjoyed spending time in classrooms reporting on the work of students and teachers. In fact, one of the achievements I’m proudest of is the New Jersey Press Association Award I received for my two-part series reporting on some of the challenges that caused once-promising schools to lose their charters.  

    One of the more challenging articles I worked on was for the Home News Tribune in East Brunswick years ago. I reported on undocumented workers hired to clean up at the Milltown Post Office in Milltown, N.J. I knew there was a strong story there, but postal officials wouldn't answer my questions, and my editors were letting me know, not exactly subtly, that the deadline was looming. What was originally a story about the borough’s post office not yet being reopened months after the April 2007 Nor’easter, switched focus to the USPS subcontracting with a business that hired undocumented immigrants to clean up the debris. After dealing with reticent USPS spokespeople, I returned to the post office, copied down the phone number and name of a garbage truck leaving the scene, and through them was able to connect with the company that contracted the undocumented immigrants. It’s one of the better examples of “don’t give up” that I have. 

    Are your stories usually assigned or do you suggest your own stories?


    It was usually a combination of me suggesting my own stories and editors assigning them to me. I can give you a couple of example of a story I came up with on my own just by examining my surroundings. 

    For instance, at a Career Day event at Union City High School in 2011, I noticed a young girl taking an elevator usually reserved for teachers, guest speakers, and students with injuries. “I’m pregnant,” she said by explanation, when a fellow classmate asked why she wasn’t taking the stairs. I learned from a fellow speaker that my alma mater, which had expanded to another part of the city a few years before, now offered a day care for teen students with children. Since Union City was outside my newspapers’ area of coverage, I did some research in Mercer County, New Jersey, and discovered that Trenton Central High School did indeed offer day care for students with children. I ended up writing a story for The Times of Trenton. 

    What do you like the most about being a journalist?

    I liked that every day was unpredictable. 

    I remember hours before the devastating earthquake hit Japan in March 2011 I was scheduled to go to happy hour with a friend and on a date later that night. I swiftly canceled both those engagements and got to work trying to localize the story. I was able to connect with Japanese Americans in Mercer County, NJ and got an e-mailed account of the terrifying earthquake from a Princeton professor who was in Tokyo at the time. Miraculously, I was able to make deadline.
     
    What advice do you have for PR professionals who want to pitch you a story?


    Try to be respectful of a reporter's time. I've had public relations professionals call at the end of the day, in the middle of a deadline, and they try to nudge to get an answer as to whether the reporter is interested in covering a certain story. I think the best way for PR professionals to pitch a story is to first send an email to gauge interest in the topic. I would send a follow-up note or call a few days later to try and get a definite answer from a reporter.
     
    What should they always do and never do? 


    I think public relations professionals should always do some research about the publication they’re pitching and see if they’re a good fit. I think it’s also great to create a good rapport with a reporter and vice versa. By the end of my four-year tenure at The Times of Trenton, I already knew some communication officials’ anniversaries and birth dates. They also knew about certain aspects of my life. It never went beyond a professional relationship, but it was nice for us to get to know each other and have pleasant and productive conversations.    

    PR professionals should never be rude or too pushy. Fortunately, I don’t think I’ve ever dealt with a rude communications professional.
     
    What's the best way for someone in PR to begin a working relationship with you? 


    That’s an interesting question because I’m now in public relations myself. I think the best way for a public relations professional to have a great working relationship with a reporter is for both individuals to get to know each other better. It’ll lead to more productive conversations. Great story ideas sometimes come from informal conversations between PR professionals and reporters.  

    What is the toughest part about what you do?


    One of the toughest things about being a reporter were the deadlines. I’m a perfectionist, and I always felt the need to go back and re-work paragraphs or add or remove quotes from the final text. I think another really tough aspect of being a reporter was reporting on people who’ve died tragically and/or publically. In those cases, it’s pivotal to be sensitive to the families and officials you’re interviewing (part of that means not rushing or interrupting a person when they’re speaking – even if a deadline is looming).  

    What's your advice for someone thinking of going into journalism and also for someone who's just starting out in the industry?


    I would say not to get discouraged if you don’t get your “dream job” right away. Many news organizations are cutting back, but if you’re tenacious and reach out to editors with freelance story ideas, or do a good job of networking and staying in touch, they may call you when they have an opening.  It's also important to read a lot of newspapers, magazines, books and trade publications. It's important to understand what makes great journalism.

    I think it also goes without saying, but you also don’t go into journalism for the money (it can be challenging at times to live on a reporter’s salary). Also, don’t expect to have traditional work hours in most cases. There were times I worked 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. (I loved that time slot because I could sleep for part of the morning and miss most of the traffic) or from 4 p.m. until Midnight.

    How do you use social media as part of your job? 


    I will follow certain people or Twitter hashtags to see what’s being said about any of WCS’s major campaigns. I’m also a pretty proud nerd, and attend conferences focusing on how to use social media more effectively. I try to attend as many of Sree Sreenivasan’s workshops as I can. Sree is a social-media guru who always teaches people new ways to connect (at one of his recent events, I learned about Twiangulate.com. If you plug in your Twitter handle, it'll give you information on your most influential followers. Another helpful site iswww.crowdbooster.com, where for a nominal fee, you can get instant feedback on the number of retweets, likes, comments and more to help you build your brand or stay on message).

    What type of experts do you prefer to work with? Do you prefer someone in a higher level role or is someone not as high up acceptable?


    I don’t think I’ve ever given too much thought about whether they were in a higher role or not, but I do say I prefer to work with experts who are professional and knowledgeable. 

    Have you ever given thought to doing something other than journalism?
     

    As a recovered anorexic, I originally thought I would make a good psychologist. My goal was to help people recover from eating disorders and be a bilingual resource for people in immigrant communities. Ever since I turned 16, however, my heart has belonged to journalism. I thought I could help more people by reporting on topics like mental health issues and muscular dystrophy. I continue to have a deep respect for the work of mental health professionals. In fact, the valedictorian of my high school class is a psychiatrist.    

    You just returned from a trip to Cuba. What was that like and why did you go?

     
    I was able to go to Cuba on an educational visa with The Chamber of the Americas, based in Denver, Colo. Since I still have family left in Cuba, I could have gone on my own, but I preferred to go with a group. 

    As the daughter of Cuban exiles, I felt compelled to visit my parents’ homeland for the first time (I’m hoping to blog about my experiences, too). Like many U.S.-born children of Cuban exiled immigrants, I learned about the human rights abuses, lack of political and press freedoms and other forms of repression from the time I could utter my first word. I vowed not to visit the island until the current communist system was part of the country’s distant past. Yet I have also heard from others that many Cubans are happy and well-educated. After visiting the island, I can say I was pleasantly surprised to hear of our speakers openly criticize the government (something I frankly didn’t expect). I was also happy our group patronized several “paladares,” or restaurants run by entrepreneurs rather than government officials.

    Without going too much more into politics, I can say with confidence that I returned to the United States a prouder American than when I left, and I’m forever grateful that my parents made the difficult decision to leave their home country when they did. 

    When you're not writing, what do you do in your spare time?

    In the past, I’ve volunteered for a great non-profit organization called Minds Matter in New York City. As a volunteer there, I would spend several hours on Saturdays during the school year helping accomplished high school students from low-income families prepare for their college careers. One of the things I’d do was read and critique their writing, including their college application essays. 

    I now spend most of my free time visiting with friends and family or traveling the country  (my goal is to visit all 50 states; I’m down to 12). But I also enjoy networking in New York City. I belong to two wonderful organizations: one is IvyConnect and the other is the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. Some of IvyConnect’s events happen to be at art galleries. Any time I could combine my love of art with getting to meet new people I know I’m in for a great evening. But being a part of the New York chapter of NAHJ this year actually encouraged me to live healthier. The journalism organization partnered with Chrysler this summer in a walking challenge to win a free trip to a convention in Anaheim last August. Needless to say, I did a lot of walking in my spare time to get my trip paid for! 

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    Media Coverage of JFK's Assassination in 1963

    Friday, November 22, 2013, 2:22 PM [General]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    November 22, 1963 is a day most Americans will never forget. Whether you were alive then or learned about the tragedy in school years or decades later, the assassination of our 35th president, John Fitzerald Kennedy, will never be forgotten.

    "Where were you when Kennedy was shot?" is a question that continues to reverberate today, often with responses that demand our attention and leave us with a lump in our throat. It was a moment in our country's history, a tragedy which is still one of the most terrible things to have happened in the United States. Someone had killed our president -- it was unthinkable.

    Back in 1963 the media was very different. Wires were received via real paper -- we had the rip and read format. Television news was relatively new and radio was a key way people got their news. There was no social media and we had to depend on the country's journalists to tell us what happened. No one can forget Walter Cronkite making the announcement that Kennedy had died. He was visibly moved but did the job he had to which was to tell the country what had happened.

    It's vital not just to remember the historical significance of that sad November day 50 years ago, but also for journalists to look back and realize how far journalism has come. Back then television news would have probably broken into programming to announce a news bulletin and then immediately have gone back to the soap opera or whatever show was on. Today news breaks and journalists are on the scene quickly, providing us with the latest updates almost as soon as the incident takes place. We can see the news happening and feel what people are feeling.

    Regardless of the passing of 50 years, the footage available allows us to feel and see the collective mourning and disbelief people felt when the news was told. So on this day of remembrance, this post is not just to commemorate a beloved man and leader, but to also go back in time to see how we were being told of the tragic events that unfolded on November 22, 1963.

    'FLASH PRESIDENT DEAD': How News Of The JFK Assassination Broke In Real Time

    As It Happened: AP Wire Copy of the JFK Assassination

    Total Domination

      

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    Media 411: Are you saying too much?

    Thursday, November 21, 2013, 2:51 PM [Media 411]
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    Have you ever wondered if you've ever said too much on social media? We've all done it at least once to varying degrees, but do you realize just how much so little can actually say?

    What exactly are you giving away on social media? You're probably thinking, "not much," but it could be plenty. If you're telling people where you are, what you're eating, or your dog's name, that's plenty of information for a complete stranger to find out more than you want them to know about you. So much so, someone could pretend to be psychic because one picture or tweet could say a whole heck of a lot.

    Next time you use social media, be very vigilant about what you're posting or it could come back to hurt you. Use the privacy settings and make sure only people you know have access to your information and photos.

    The videos below are perfect examples of people having their eyes opened to the reality of how much impact their social media/online use really has. Our information is out there for all to see.



    See original post here.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    Upcoming PR/Media Events

    Friday, November 15, 2013, 12:44 PM [Upcoming Events]
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    We regularly update our ProfNet Connect calendar to include upcoming events we think will be of interest to PR and media professionals. Here are a few events coming up over the next few weeks:

    Event: Online Hate Speech Around the Globe
    Host: Online News Association DC
    Date: Nov. 19    
    Location: Washington, DC
    Summary: For the upcoming ONA meetup, Internews Project Director Will Ferroggiaro will discuss Internews’ human rights program, which focuses on the role of media in conflict, whether inciting violence or mitigating its causes. Currently, Internews works with local partners in Kenya, Kyrgyzstan and Burma to monitor media for hate speech.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Peer Group with former president Kathy Gilles
    Host: PRSA Westchester/Fairfield
    Date: Nov. 22
    Location: Purchase, NY
    Summary: Join our well known and highly respected guest-advisor Kathy Lewton, MHA, MSJ, APR, Fellow, Public Relations Society of America --  former national president of PRSA -- who will lead a discussion of your issues and objectives plus value-added and organic growth including:
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Beyond the Ordinary: Improving Coverage of Disability
    Host: Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication
    Date: Nov. 25
    Location: Phoenix
    Summary: Ryan Gabrielson of California Watch, winner of the inaugural Katherine Schneider Journalism Award for Excellence in Reporting on Disability, discusses reporting on disability issues. Introduction by Steve Doig, Knight Chair in Journalism
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Inside Social Marketing
    Host: Mediabistro
    Date: Dec. 3-4
    Location: New York
    Summary: a comprehensive look at social media innovations and monetization issues impacting top digital media and marketing experts. Our case studies and real-world perspectives offer attendees a deep analysis of the latest Facebook and Twitter tools, metrics, and advertising trends. Navigating the big opportunities and fast-changing risks that are impacting brands, retailers, publishers, and agencies across the entire social media landscape is what ISM is all about.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Cocktails & Conversations: Where is the Print Industry Going?
    Host: New York Women in Communications    
    Date: Dec. 5    
    Location: New York
    Summary: That tactile sensation of holding something tangible as you read is still a powerful draw. Yet, to remain vital, traditional publishers must follow the audience to their preferred platforms. So, magazines, books, and newspapers are morphing, and digital is more and more part of the mix. Yet, how it all shakes out depends on where media brands place their bets today. We'll ask our panelists about strategy, content, and the industry's outlook for the future.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Region 5 Conference
    Host: National Association of Hispanic Journalists
    Date: Dec. 7
    Location: Dallas
    Summary: Get ready for the December NAHJ Region 5 conference “Voces Unidas” in downtown Dallas.  Meet recruiters, local news managers and national news correspondents, producers and executives.  Univision’s Maria Antonieta Collins and CNN’s Ramon Escobar plan to be at the conference. The conference starts on Friday, December 6 with an opening reception at the Fairmont Dallas.  On Saturday, December 7 expect a packed day of informative panels with some of the best experts in journalism.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: The Weekend
    Host: The Publicity Club of NY
    Date: Dec. 12
    Location: New York
    Summary: Luncheon followed by panel discussion with journalists.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Obamacare: Covering What Comes Next
    Host: Poynter Institute
    Date: Jan. 22-24
    Location: College Park, MD
    Summary: The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, raises complex and often very personal questions for Americans. Reporters can learn the facts and nuances of this program, how it works, what it means and how to localize this story at a three-day Poynter workshop in January.
    Complete event info here.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    Media 411: Where is the future of media?

    Thursday, November 14, 2013, 12:58 PM [Media 411]
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    Last night I was studying my almost two-year-old daughter and it dawned on me that she is completely mesmerized by my cell phone, my tablet and my laptop. She eagerly reaches over to grab my iPhone and screams to watch, “Mini! Mini! Agnes! Agnes!” (She just can’t get enough of anything Despicable Me.) Although I try to keep her television viewing to a minimum, it can be very difficult to keep a mobile device away from her sweet little hands.

    This same girl squirms and screams during diaper changes and most times she gets placed into the car seat, and the only thing to exorcise this toddler possession is -- you guessed it -- my iPhone.  Those tiny fingers somehow manage to open the many apps I have for her and also find their way to my camera roll where she happily announces, “Photo! Photo!” each time she finds an image. This little person is the future. Can you imagine what the future will be like for her if she’s already gravitating towards mobile technology? I think she knows more about the iPhone than I do.

    Many, many, years ago, who would have thought that people would pay for television? Then in the blink of an eye the dawn of cable and satellite arrived. What about coffee? Would you ever have thought we’d pay $5.00 for a cup of coffee? Then a chain seemed to take over the world.  Things we didn’t see as possible are now the everyday and we don’t really question it. So back to my original question: Where is the future of media?

    I think it falls within mobile but the challenge among media outlets and even other industries is how to make money with mobile devices and the internet? Online departments are going to have to seriously study the habits of people.  As it is, most people click on “Skip Ad” when give the option and anytime commercials play before a selected video make people leave the site. I don’t have the patience, personally.

    Many newspapers have struggled to reach the level of online paying subscribers they wanted when they went behind a pay wall system which undermined what the newspapers thought was valued content by readers.  The internet has always been free to a certain extent and people just aren’t willing to open their wallets for something they’ve never had to pay for.

    But just like television and coffee, times change and a new audience will be ready to use mobile in a way we haven’t yet. My baby will likely be part of that revolution.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.


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