Evelyn Tipacti

Loading...
    • Member Type(s): Content Publisher
      Expert
      Communications Professional
      Media - Freelancer
      Media - Broadcast
      Media - Print Journalist
      Media - Student Journalist
      Media - Web-only/Blogger
      Media - Other
      Other
    • Title:Community Editor
    • Organization:ProfNet Connect (PR Newswire)
    • Area of Expertise:Media Relations, Hispanic Media
    •  

    To become a ProfNet premium member and receive requests from reporters looking for expert sources, click here.

    Media 411: Latino Outlets Shut Down

    Friday, February 21, 2014, 4:43 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    CNN Latino and NBC Latino have more in common than just the audience they hoped to reach – they’re both done with, each failing to make it to the two-year mark. There were high expectations for both, but each shut down almost as quickly as it debuted.

    So is this a good thing or a bad thing? It depends on who you ask and I’ve read articles on both sides. Let’s start with the ones who think it’s a bad idea. The argument is that Latinos, especially younger and bilingual Latinos need these Latino-centric sites and that not enough time was given to allow for a successful venture to see how people would respond. Many have thought the demise of these to be a direct insult to the Latino community, but both closures seem to have been based on “business” decisions.

    Then there are those who believe that separating Latino news was wrong to begin with since they felt the goal was to integrate news of interest to that particular audience to blend in with everything else. If Latinos are trying to become part of the mainstream, then why separate content?

    I personally feel that English dominant Latinos want to belong to something bigger, not be categorized into a separate group. Those of us born in the United States who went to school here and are every bit American don’t feel it’s necessary to keep news of interest to us as Latinos in a separate location because of that.

    While I support the vision and goals of Latino-centric outlets, I also think that the Spanish language outlets that already exist need to modernize their programming to increase the coveted millennial audience. Include some English, perhaps?

    If someone wants to try something like what NBC and CNN did, more power to them. I do think there’s an audience out there but it would need time to develop. A year to a year and a half is not sufficient time. Were people even aware of their existence? I think they gave up too easily, but it’s their right to do what they need to, whether or not you agree with it. It also  tells us that the Latino market is not easily grabbed. Univision and Telemundo are two power houses that have invested time and money.  

    Lastly, it may be that in order to truly reach Latinos, things need to be done by Latinos in a Latino way -- neither CNN or NBC are true Latino outlets.

    What do you think?

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, or get timely experts and story ideas by email. Both are free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    SPOTLIGHT: Darryl E. Owens, The Orlando Sentinel

    Thursday, February 20, 2014, 4:32 PM [Spotlight]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Welcome to our SPOTLIGHT feature, where we highlight a journalist and ProfNet user to share their personal story and insight with you.

    This SPOTLIGHT belongs to Darryl E. Owens, an editorial writer/columnist at The Orlando Sentinel.

    After earning his journalism degree at Howard University, Owens joined the Orlando Sentinel in June 1990. During his two decades at the Sentinel, he's covered small-town politics, the night police beat, family/parenting issues, health and wellness and human interest topics.

    We hope you find SPOTLIGHT both enjoyable and informative.

    Darryl, where was your first job as a journalist?

    While attending Howard University in Washington, DC, I worked as a reporter for the Prince George’s (Maryland) Post, a neighborhood weekly, then for the Washington Afro-American, one of the nation’s legendary standard-bearers of the weekly black press.

    When did you realize journalism was your calling?
      
    When I realized math wasn’t. I was a marketing major and soon realized math and I would forever be embroiled in a blood feud. A friend, cognizant of my prowess for writing, suggested I follow the path of Clark Kent.

    What's your role at the Orlando Sentinel?
      
    These days, I serve on the Editorial Board, writing editorials and managing our online Opinion channel content. I also write an award-winning once-weekly general interest Metro column.

    What type of stories do you cover?
      
    As an editorial writer, I write institutional opinion pieces about legislative issues, criminal justice, K-12 education issues and more. As a columnist, I write about whatever tickles my fancy that week, from poignant pieces about my family life, politics, education, race, religion, social commentary, social justice, mentoring, homelessness, etc.

    Are your stories usually assigned or do you select what you cover?
      
    Both. I generally generate ideas for editorials, but my supervisor can assign ideas. And with my column, I steer the ship, with occasional course corrections from the powers that be.

    Do you have a "favorite" aspect of your job - - something you like best about it?
      
    Because of my fondness for narrative writing, I simply enjoy telling the stories of ordinary Janes and Joes, stories of succeeding against all odds, human stories of failing and rising like the phoenix, and stories where the ending is the ending we all ultimately face. No one gets out of this life alive, and the stories of people facing that prospect, sooner than later, are often the most compelling and instructional.
      
    What would you say to a PR professional who wants to pitch you a story?
      
    Have a firm grasp of what you intend to pitch. Know your stuff. Know your target. Avoid carpet-bombing the ranks of a particularly media organization. Pick one — the right writer whose beat lends itself to the subject — and make your pitch. If no luck, then move on. Few things rankle reporters more than turf wars that start over stories PR professionals pitch to multiple writers at the same time.  And I prefer receiving pitching by email. It’s easy to file and retain the information that way, and I can review the information on my time, not having to be brusque with someone who calls on deadline.

    What's the best way for someone in PR to start a working relationship with you?

    I like gadgets...No, seriously, the best way is contact me with a story that falls in my wheelhouse and be on your game: have the information I need to make the story meaningful to my readers, be accessible if I need additional  information, and be accessible throughout the process until the story appears in the paper. That builds trust.

    What is the toughest part about being a journalist?
      
    These days, watching our ranks go the way of the dinosaur, thanks to changes in the way people consume information and the democratization of information by the Internet.

    What has been the most challenging assignment to cover?
      
    My most challenging assignment was covering the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, gathering at the makeshift morgue where coroners tried to ID bodies, watching broken people trying to find their lost pets at a makeshift pet shelter, watching a man push a shopping cart of government ice five miles to share with home-bound residents of a ramshackle housing project.

    Is there a career highlight that stands out?
      
    I’ve won both national and state first-place awards for column writing, but my career highlight was writing a story about homeless children “shopping” for school clothes at a shelter’s store, preparing for the first day of school. Though the story wasn’t a plea for contributions, readers contributed about $45K to the shelter to help those kids after the story published. Cool.

    What's your advice for someone thinking of becoming a journalist and also for someone who's just starting out?
      
    In this current incarnation of journalism, it makes sense to ground yourself in the digital realm. Become versed in social media, learn how to shoot and edit video, and learning web design won’t hurt. And oh, yeah, hone your writing craft. Though writing is often tertiary to Facebook and Twitter and video web clicks, you still need to be able to tell a good and compelling story.
     
    Do you use social media in your job? What do you like most and least about it?
      
    Yes, we use Facebook to promote our editorials and my columns, and to engage readers in discussion. I like the immediacy of response, but I dislike the often ill-informed and sometimes Cro-Magnon responses legitimate issues often provoke.

    What tips do you have for members in responding to ProfNet queries? 

    I find it best that responders to my ProfNet requests do so via email, and with the email provide the proposed source’s name, title, affiliation, credentials and phone/email contacts. If your proposed source is up to snuff, I then can follow-up at my leisure.

    What type of experts do you prefer to work with? Do you prefer someone with a bigger title or can it be someone other than a company president or CEO, for example?
      
    It depends on the story/issue. Sometimes it’s good to seek out the big cheese, but the head honcho isn’t’ always the most conversant/quotable person either.

    Have you ever thought of doing anything other than journalism?
      
    Yes. I’d give this all up to be a blues guitarist traveling with Robert Cray or Buddy Guy. If only I could play the guitar.
     
    What do you do in your spare time?
      
    Spare time?

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, or get timely experts and story ideas by email. Both are free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    PR Newswire for Journalists Gets a Makeover

    Tuesday, February 11, 2014, 2:43 PM [General]
    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    If you use PR Newswire for Journalists, get ready for some major enhancements!

    The updates won’t affect your current newsfeed, but PR Newswire for Journalists will have a new look and functionality.

    We’re making it easier for you to search, customize and view content on any device you’re using. PR Newswire for Journalists will be optimized for ALL devices (mobile, iPad, etc.)

    When you do a search, you can save it to instantly create a customized newsfeed.

    We’ve also cut out the time it will take you to search for news releases from a specific company or organization. Every news release will give you headline links to other recent announcements from the same organization.

    Lastly, you can connect with other journalists and stay up on the latest media trends via our Community Page. This will feature a media-focused blog, industry news and moves, job listings and more.

    What won't change: You’ll still be able to create customized newsfeeds of news you want when you want it. You’ll have the same access to thousands of photos and images from our multimedia archive, as well as the ability to search our news release archive and company contacts section.

    The ProfNet experts service will continue to be easily accessible through the PR Newswire for Journalists site. Hundreds of thousand of experts will be available to provide quotes and expert opinion for your stories.

    Our award-winning site has proven to be an excellent resource for journalists and we’re making it feel and function better than ever. Email us at MediaSite@prnewswire.com with any questions.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, or get timely experts and story ideas by email. Both are free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    The New ProfNet on PR Newswire for Journalists

    Friday, February 7, 2014, 3:49 PM [General]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    For over 20 years, you’ve trusted ProfNet to help find the experts you need, and now we’re introducing enhancements that will make it even easier to help you find those experts.

    Here's a sneak peek:

    Your ProfNet Inbox will provide access to all your queries. You can access them at any time to re-send them or turn them off:

     

    Via the Query Preferences tab, you can set distribution preferences for all your queries. If you always cloak your queries, you can make that your default preference for all queries. The same can be done with organization types and regions, saving you time and effort:

     

    After sending a query, you can also supplement your search via the experts database on our ProfNet Connect network, with thousands and thousands of experts:

     

    Also, if you access ProfNet via the PR Newswire for Journalists site, your name, news organization, and email address will automatically populate, saving you even more time.

    The new design is also optimized for all devices (mobile, iPad, etc.), making it easier to use ProfNet from any location:

    Not yet a ProfNet user? Go to media.prnewswire.com and click on the “Get Started Now” button to fill out a simple form with your basic information:

     

    Once you’ve logged onto the site, just look for the ProfNet Experts tab.

    If you have any questions about using ProfNet on PR Newswire for Journalists, our team is always ready to help. Just email us at profnet@profnet.com. And stay tuned here for more information next week.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    Introducing the New and Improved PR Newswire for Journalists

    Wednesday, February 5, 2014, 1:11 PM [General]
    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    If you use PR Newswire for Journalists, get ready for an even better experience! The site is about to get some major improvements beginning Feb. 14.

    We’ve enhanced to greatly improve ease-of-use, making it simpler for you to search, customize, and view content on the device of your choice. These updates will not affect your current newsfeed, but the site itself will have a new look, feel, and functionality.

    Some of the new features include:

    • Responsive design optimized for all devices (mobile, iPad, etc.);
    • The ability to instantly create a customized newsfeed from any search;
    • Every news release provides headline links to other recent announcements from the same company;
    • A new Community Page that helps you keep up with your peers and trends with a media-focused blog, media job listings and moves, and industry news.

    What won’t change: You will have the same access to the news release archive, ProfNet experts, photos and company logos and company contacts, and will still be able to select the type of news you want, when you want it.

    If you don’t use PR Newswire for Journalists, now’s the time to get started! Check out this video for a quick sneak peek:

    Questions? PR Newswire’s media relations team is ready to help set up your newsfeed or provide any other assistance you need to get the most out of the upgraded site. Simply send a note to Media.Relations@prnewswire.com.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    Media 411: How the Same Scripted Story Can Air in So Many Places

    Thursday, January 30, 2014, 3:44 PM [Media 411]
    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    If you watch Conan O’Brien you’ll know he has an amusing segment that pokes fun at various news stations across the country that all seem to have news anchors reading the exact same script to one particular story. To most people, it seems pretty hilarious and unoriginal and those late night talk shows would make it seem like it’s a terrible thing, but is there really something wrong with it?

    Local newscast producers try to vary their shows with material that isn’t limited to their general area.  A big story could be happening in a city other than their own and the affiliate from their network in the city where the story is happening could simply share the video and script with any of the other affiliates.

    This happens a lot with feature stories or entertainment stories where the network may send one affiliate’s story on a feed and that story gets picked up by the other affiliates. Those scripts are easily shared and there you have the story that everyone seems to have which makes it onto shows like “Conan.”

    I found the perfect explanation for how the same stories end up on newscasts around the country right here on Patrick’s Place. It explains perfectly why this can happen and if there’s really a problem when it does.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, or get timely experts and story ideas by email. Both are free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    Media 411: The Popular Unpopular Stories

    Thursday, January 23, 2014, 4:22 PM [Media 411]
    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    If you read this blog regularly, you know it usually focuses on stories that affect the media in some way and yes, the post today does focus on the media, but in a different way.

    Unless you’ve been under a rock most of the day, you know Justin Bieber was arrested today in Miami Beach. Even if you don’t care (raises hand), the fact is that this story is EVERYWHERE.

    I think most people have forgotten about Syria and the rest of the world since all I can see is his mug shot splattered all over TV and social media. As I peek at my Facebook account, there are two back to back stories about his arrest. Even my ears can’t get a break as radio is also talking about Bieber’s current dilemma nonstop.

    The other bit of news I’m seeing quite a bit of today is the outpouring of hatred over the design of team USA’s Olympic uniform for the opening ceremonies. I’ve read amusing comments comparing the Ralph Lauren designs to a grandmother’s knitting needles gone mad to something you’d see in an ugly sweater contest. From what I’ve read the colorful cardigan is supposed to be reminiscent of the all American quilt but you can make your own opinions when you see the design. I’m seeing mainly negative comments but also some positive which balance it out, somewhat.

    Is this all really news? Well, yes. We’re seeing what we’re interested in seeing. Even if you’re not a fan of Justin Bieber, you may secretly be enjoying the story while you roll your eyes in the car or make casual conversation with a co-worker.

    How do these stories become the most popular stories of the day? If social media is any indication, everyone is in on the scoop, even those of us well past the age of 16. It’s hard to not read or share a story about a pop sensation that makes the headlines as often as he does. Bieber’s hardcore fan base also makes him difficult to ignore when you consider he has over 48 million followers. Yes, you read that correctly.

    Now as for the Olympic uniforms, people want to see how we’ll be represented in Sochi. Whether you think they look like a yarn store disaster or think they actually look nice, it’s a story because it represents all of us in some way.  The rest of the world will be either laughing at our athletes or think they look cool. Besides, show me someone who doesn’t have an opinion. If you’ve seen the uniform, I guarantee you’ll have something to say.

    Whether or not you agree of these two stories are newsworthy, the proof is in the fact that they’re everywhere. It doesn’t matter whether you care or not. Do you care about Syria? Do you care about Sochi? No? Even if you don't, many others do.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, or get timely experts and story ideas by email. Both are free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    #ConnectChat Recap: The Role of Hispanic Media in 2014

    Wednesday, January 22, 2014, 2:45 PM [#ConnectChat]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    On Tuesday, Jan. 21, we hosted our latest #ConnectChat, " The Role of Hispanic Media in 2014" with Maritza Puello, (@cocodark), a managing editor of Newscore at Fusion, the ABC-Univision venture that launched in October of last year.

    Maritza discussed Fusion, its content, the differences between Hispanic and English language stations, challenges in the industry and much more.

    Please follow @ProfNet and @editorev on Twitter for more information on future chats or check back right here on ProfNet Connect for details.

     

     

    Fusion is a new network and many may still not be aware if what it is. Can you please tell us what it's about and how it came to be?

    The programming focuses on news, pop culture and satire. Fusion came about as joint venture between ABC and Univision

    What is your role there and what did you do before arriving at Fusion?

    I am Managing Editor with the NewsCore department. Our department primarily handles day of news content. Before coming to Fusion, I was the Executive Editor at @NY1Noticias in New York City. @NY1Noticias is a 24 hours Spanish language news channel covering the city of New York.

    Who is the target audience for Fusion and is the programming in English or Spanish?

    Fusion is targeted to millennials. All the programming is in English.

    How exactly does the partnership between ABC and Univision work? Is it shared programming?

    Fusion generates original programming. ABC and Univision both provide resources. Those resources can be information, technical support, talent, equipment, etc.

    Is the talent from one of those specific networks or are they solely Fusion reporters, producers, etc.?

    Fusion has its own team of reporters, producer and production staff. There are times when on-air talent from ABC or Univision comes on the shows. Jorge Ramos does have his own show on Fusion, called, "America with Jorge Ramos".

    Is the production based in NYC only? Or do you cover other regions?

    Fusion is headquartered in Miami. We have staff who files stories from other cities but almost everything comes out of Miami.

    Is there any chance of ever creating Spanish programming?

    There are no plans at this time to create Spanish programming.

    What type of shows does Fusion have on the air?

    We have all sorts of programming. We have a Morning Show. Jorge Ramos has a news magazine show, Alicia Menendez has a show. We have a soccer show called the @SoccerGods. Our Morning show has a lot of comedy.

    Does Fusion work with PR agencies and do you accept pitches?

    Fusion doesn't work much with PR agencies. We take careful attention to create original content. We welcome all pitches. It's up to individual producers to decide what they want to use.

    You've been in the business for a long time -- what do you see as the biggest challenge today for television news, especially Spanish-language outlets?

    I think the biggest challenge for TV news is how to hold on to the viewers. People have lots of choices these days. I think Spanish-language stations don't have the same resources available to them that English-language outlets do. Spanish-language stations always have to do more with fewer resources.

    Besides language, how do Spanish language TV stations differ from general English language TV stations? 

    I think one of the key differences bet English and Spanish TV News stations is in the stories that are covered. I think one of the key differences bet English and Spanish TV News stations is in the stories that are covered. Spanish language media also covers more international news, especially stories coming from Latin America.

    What does a young, aspiring journalist need to do to advance in today's media landscape?

    See how stories are treated differently by outlets and how they are presented differently across platforms. Also read/watch things that fall outside your favorite choice categories. Explore other topics. For aspiring journalist, I would say consume as much media as you can, across all platforms. Newspaper, digital, social, radio.

    With social media nowadays is it harder / easier for young journalists to cover the news?

    I think it's easier. Social media give journalist a lot more places to explore, discover.

    What differences do you see between Hispanic outlets just 5 to 10 years ago to today's newsrooms?

    There isn't much change in the newsroom from 5 years ago as far as storytelling. The stories that are of importance to the community will always need to be told. The difference that I have seen is in the use of social media. Social Media has become an essential part of how we produce and share content.

    What do you think Hispanic TV stations need to do to keep themselves relevant and attracting an audience?

    Spanish language TV stations need to embrace technology. Social media in particular is a great way to keep people informed as to what is going in their communities or in the world. It's important to remember, good stories - good storytelling will never go away. What will change is the way we tell those stories. Technology is what is helping us innovate in how those great stories are shared.

    Audiences are changing and our generation is getting older. What are today's 18-34 demographic looking for?

    Millennials are looking to be informed, entertained. They want to share thoughts, ideas and build a sense of community. Millennials take stand on issues. They’re curious about what's happening on their block, and what's happening in the world.

    How is Fusion dealing with the fact that it's not being carried everywhere and does that pose any problems for content, distribution or talent?

    Fusion's team is working hard on distribution. As with many newly launched channels the audience is small at first. Our digital/social teams are doing an outstanding job in getting our content on the web.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, or get timely experts and story ideas by email. Both are free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

     

    Media 411: Cutbacks in the Newsroom

    Friday, January 17, 2014, 3:37 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    The start of the year can be a time of change in many aspects and in the news business it’s also a prime time for layoffs. This is never a good or fun topic, but it’s a part of the always changing landscape of the industry. Just short of three weeks into the year, some cuts have already been made on the west coast.

    This morning I started reading about the big changes at the Cleveland Plain Dealer, not so much about specific layoffs, but about how a smaller staff has impacted the newsroom which for many, no longer feels like a newsroom. Change is difficult, no doubt.

    Just yesterday word came out that The Orange County Register laid off about thirty-something staff members as did the Riverside Press-Enterprise.

    Cutbacks aren’t something I like to write about and if you’ve been on that end, you know it’s a worrisome and very stressful time.

    However, for those of us who work in the media industry regardless of position, it’s always a reality but doesn’t that go for most industries anyway?

    The fact is this won’t be the only time we hear of layoffs this year. It’s terribly unfortunate, but we all need to know what’s happening to our brothers and sisters in media.

    Layoffs come at OC Register and Riverside Press-Enterprise

    Layoffs at Time Inc.

    Times-Picayune Lawsuits Over Newspaper Layoffs Move To Federal Court

    Have you ever received a pink slip? Did you stay in the indsutry or did you move on?

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, or get timely experts and story ideas by email. Both are free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    Upcoming #ConnectChat: The Role of Hispanic Media in 2014

    Thursday, January 16, 2014, 4:39 PM [#ConnectChat]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Our next #ConnectChat, "The Role of Hispanic Media in 2014," will feature Maritza Puello, (@cocodark), a managing editor of Newscore at FUSION, the ABC-Univision venture that launched in October of last year.

    The chat will take place Tuesday, Jan. 21, from 3 to 4:30 p.m, EST. To submit questions for Maritza in advance, please email profnetconnect@prnewswire.com or tweet your question to @ProfNet or @editorev.

    We will discuss the challenges of Hispanic media, how it differs from general English language media, and of course talk about FUSION and many other topics.

    We'll try to get to as many questions as we can. Of course, you can also ask your question live during the chat. To help you keep track of the conversation, we’ll use the #connectchat hashtag. Please use that hashtag if you are tweeting a question or participating in the chat.

    If you can't make it to the chat, don't worry -- a transcript will be provided on ProfNet Connect the next day.

    About Maritza Puello



    Maritza joined FUSION from NY1 Noticias, the only 24-hour Spanish-language local news station covering New York City.

    She helped launch the network 10 years ago and had a lead role in its coverage of the biggest stories in the biggest city in the nation.

    In the fall of 2012 Maritza managed NY1 Noticias’ around-the-clock coverage of Superstorm Sandy and its aftermath. Her team reported on the full force of the storm across the five boroughs even while their offices ran on back-up power for days in the middle of the blackout zone.

    Before joining NY1 she was part of the product development team at StarMedia.com, which at the time was the largest web portal serving Hispanics in the U.S. and Latin America..

    As Managing Editor of Newscore at Fusion, Maritza oversees the newsgathering team, coordinate breaking news coverage, and makes sure the newsroom is on top of all the stories that matter to the audience.

    She is based in Miami.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, or get timely experts and story ideas by email. Both are free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.


    Page 6 of 42  •  Prev 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 ... 42 Next