Evelyn Tipacti

Loading...
    • Member Type(s): Content Publisher
      Expert
      Communications Professional
      Media - Freelancer
      Media - Broadcast
      Media - Print Journalist
      Media - Student Journalist
      Media - Web-only/Blogger
      Media - Other
      Other
    • Title:Community Editor
    • Organization:ProfNet Connect (PR Newswire)
    • Area of Expertise:Media Relations, Hispanic Media
    •  

    To become a ProfNet premium member and receive requests from reporters looking for expert sources, click here.

    Writing after the Criticism

    Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 1:44 PM [General]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    If you're a writer, you've most likely received criticism, constructive or not, and have had to do some rewriting to finalize a piece for publication and make an editor happy. But sometimes the criticism comes from the most difficult editor you'll ever meet -- you.

    Writing isn't always done in one sitting, one perfect word after another. It takes time and several edits before one can successfully complete a piece worthy of publication and praise. The key to success is not letting those fears or the self-criticism eat away at your confidence, You know your abilities and you've always overcome any criticism to complete something great.

    "So much of writing is just that: rewriting, either because we know from experience or intuition that we have not landed the language, or because an editor tells us we are off the mark," says Janice Lynch Schuster, an essayist, poet, and author of several books on improving care for the end of life. 

    If this is something to which you can relate, read Schuster's helpful piece in the ASJA's blog, The Word -- Out of My Own Way: Listening to Critics and Rewriting My Masterpieces.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    Upcoming PR/Media Events

    Friday, March 7, 2014, 1:20 PM [Upcoming Events]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    We regularly update our ProfNet Connect calendar to include upcoming events we think will be of interest to PR and media professionals. Here are a few events coming up over the next few weeks. Know of an event coming up? Email us the details and we’ll include in our next post.

    Event: Second Annual Pitching Long Island
    Host: PR Professionals of Long Island
    Date: March 11
    Location: Plainview, N.Y.
    Summary: If you live or work on Long Island, this panel discussion will open your eyes to what it takes to market the region. Panelists include representatives from Island Harvest, Zimmerman/Edelson, Farmingdale State College of New York, and Baker Tilly.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: PRSA Bootcamp
    Host: PRSA
    Date: March 11-12
    Location: Miami
    Summary: Take a deep dive into the key aspects of the public relations profession. Whether you are a journalist, new graduate, transitioning from another field, new in your position or wanting to learn more about public relations, this overview with Robin Schell, APR, Fellow PRSA, will provide you with the knowledge you need.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: 2014 Pro-Am Day
    Host: PRSA Dallas
    Date: March 14
    Location: Dallas
    Summary: Pro-Am Day connects students with experienced public relations professionals through a shadowing opportunity followed by an educational luncheon program. Students will be paired with an experienced practitioner during the morning to gain valuable public relations insight and establish network contacts in this unique mentoring opportunity. Afterward, all participants are invited to the PRSA Dallas luncheon for more mingling and to see a fantastic panel of North Texas communicators headlining, "All-Star Insights."
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Evolution of Media: How Newsrooms Are Adapting to the Ever-Changing Digital Media Environment
    Host: PR Newswire
    Date: March 
    Location: Webinar
    Summary: This webinar will cover how today's media continues to reinvent their newsrooms and journalists adapt to a faster news cycle. The discussion will tackle issues such as: the debate between speed versus accuracy; owning up to misinformation; tools to help journalists deliver accurate news faster than before. 
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Social Media ROI for Journalists
    Host: Reynolds Center for Business Journalism
    Date: March 25
    Location: Online
    Summary: This free, one-hour webinar will examine the four stages of social media use in the newsroom: from an active presence, to engagement, to steeting the conversation, to full integration. This webinar will be of interest to managers overseeing social media and online news, and for individuals who are beginning to ask (or are being asked by their publishers), “Is all this time on social media worth it?”
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Detecting Corporation Fraud
    Host: Reynolds Center for Business Journalism
    Date: March 27
    Location: Phoenix
    Summary: In this free workshop, journalists will learn techniques for digging – with an eye for fraud – into U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filings and other disclosures.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Investigating Stockbrokers and Financial Advisers
    Host: Reynolds Center for Business Journalism
    Date: April 9
    Location: Online
    Summary: Learn whether stockbrokers or investment advisers have run afoul of regulators or been the subject of customer complaints. This one-hour webinar will guide you through the FINRA BrokerCheck database and the SEC’s Investment Adviser registration database. You’ll also learn how state securities regulators police the industry and how to obtain results of their investigations for your stories.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Disruptive Innovation and Strategic Counsel: Keeping Your Institution (And You) Relevant
    Host: PRSA
    Date: April 9-11
    Location: Washington, D.C.
    Summary: Higher education communicators have a full course load, from dealing with the rise in massive open online courses (MOOCs) to preparing a campus-wide crisis communications program. The PRSA Counselors to Higher Education (CHE) Senior Summit offers creative approaches to keep your communication strategies and tactics cutting edge.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Strategic Corporate Communications Leadership Summit
    Host: IABC
    Date: April 10-11
    Location: Washington, D.C.
    Summary: If you are responsible for corporate communication, public relations, human resources, social media, marketing or organizational effectiveness, join us as we reveal the latest corporate communication strategies, techniques and measurement tools.
    Complete event info here.

    Event: Creating a Strong Brand Identity Through Persuasive Messaging
    Host: NJ CAMA
    Date: April 17
    Location: Princeton, N.J.
    Summary: Whether your business is large or small, a strong brand identity is the key to standing out in a crowded marketplace. Guest speakers will lead an enlightening discussion on creating and maintaining your brand, developing a powerful voice, and how technology can support those efforts.  The event is co-sponsored by the NJ Creative Professionals.
    Complete event info here.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    Media 411: TV News Segments That Make a Difference

    Thursday, March 6, 2014, 4:26 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Local newscasts are full of segments designed to help their audience – whether it’s a regular health segment from a medical reporter (usually a doctor) or one of those popular “On Your Side” segments, they all try to make a positive difference in the lives of those who watch them.

    Sometimes one sticks out of the bunch and one such segment is WFAA TV’s (Dallas/ABC) “Wednesday’s Child” which helps find adoptive homes for foster children and has been doing so since 1989.

    Anchor Gloria Campos reported the story of one particular child, Ke’onte, back in 2007 when he was just eight years old and again in 2009 after a failed adoption.

    Earlier this week he gave Gloria a wonderful surprise visit on the set, making this, the same week she retires after a very successful career as a journalist, even more special.

    Ke’onte Cook thanked Gloria for helping him find his family, but why read about it when you can watch the wonderful story right here:

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, or get timely experts and story ideas by email. Both are free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    Media 411: Al Jazeera Journalists Detained in Egypt

    Thursday, February 27, 2014, 4:04 PM [Media 411]
    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    The staff of Al Jazeera has come together to support four colleagues who have been imprisoned in Egypt for several months and are calling on the rest of the world to help these journalists regain their freedom by getting the word out to as many people as possible to put pressure on Egypt.

    The ‘Global Day of Action’ is a protest calling for the release of these four journalists, three of who were detained on December 29, accused of belonging to a terrorist group and spreading false information

    Egypt is notorious for its attacks on journalistic freedom and was also given the unenviable title of being one of the most dangerous places for journalists according to the Committee to Protect Journalists. One of the four has been detained for more than six months and is currently on a hunger strike.

    The Al Jazeera journalists being held in Egypt are Pete Greste, Mohamed Fahmy, Baher Mohamed and Abdullah Al Shamy.

    The idea of the “Global Day of Action’ is to bring attention to the plight of these men and to let the world know of a disturbing situation which is only getting worse for journalists who work in Egypt.

    Journalists in several locations have shown their support and you can also show your support via Twitter by using the #FreeAJStaff hashtag.

    For more information about this case, please continue reading here via the links provided.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, or get timely experts and story ideas by email. Both are free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    Media 411: Latino Outlets Shut Down

    Friday, February 21, 2014, 4:43 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    CNN Latino and NBC Latino have more in common than just the audience they hoped to reach – they’re both done with, each failing to make it to the two-year mark. There were high expectations for both, but each shut down almost as quickly as it debuted.

    So is this a good thing or a bad thing? It depends on who you ask and I’ve read articles on both sides. Let’s start with the ones who think it’s a bad idea. The argument is that Latinos, especially younger and bilingual Latinos need these Latino-centric sites and that not enough time was given to allow for a successful venture to see how people would respond. Many have thought the demise of these to be a direct insult to the Latino community, but both closures seem to have been based on “business” decisions.

    Then there are those who believe that separating Latino news was wrong to begin with since they felt the goal was to integrate news of interest to that particular audience to blend in with everything else. If Latinos are trying to become part of the mainstream, then why separate content?

    I personally feel that English dominant Latinos want to belong to something bigger, not be categorized into a separate group. Those of us born in the United States who went to school here and are every bit American don’t feel it’s necessary to keep news of interest to us as Latinos in a separate location because of that.

    While I support the vision and goals of Latino-centric outlets, I also think that the Spanish language outlets that already exist need to modernize their programming to increase the coveted millennial audience. Include some English, perhaps?

    If someone wants to try something like what NBC and CNN did, more power to them. I do think there’s an audience out there but it would need time to develop. A year to a year and a half is not sufficient time. Were people even aware of their existence? I think they gave up too easily, but it’s their right to do what they need to, whether or not you agree with it. It also  tells us that the Latino market is not easily grabbed. Univision and Telemundo are two power houses that have invested time and money.  

    Lastly, it may be that in order to truly reach Latinos, things need to be done by Latinos in a Latino way -- neither CNN or NBC are true Latino outlets.

    What do you think?

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, or get timely experts and story ideas by email. Both are free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    SPOTLIGHT: Darryl E. Owens, The Orlando Sentinel

    Thursday, February 20, 2014, 4:32 PM [Spotlight]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Welcome to our SPOTLIGHT feature, where we highlight a journalist and ProfNet user to share their personal story and insight with you.

    This SPOTLIGHT belongs to Darryl E. Owens, an editorial writer/columnist at The Orlando Sentinel.

    After earning his journalism degree at Howard University, Owens joined the Orlando Sentinel in June 1990. During his two decades at the Sentinel, he's covered small-town politics, the night police beat, family/parenting issues, health and wellness and human interest topics.

    We hope you find SPOTLIGHT both enjoyable and informative.

    Darryl, where was your first job as a journalist?

    While attending Howard University in Washington, DC, I worked as a reporter for the Prince George’s (Maryland) Post, a neighborhood weekly, then for the Washington Afro-American, one of the nation’s legendary standard-bearers of the weekly black press.

    When did you realize journalism was your calling?
      
    When I realized math wasn’t. I was a marketing major and soon realized math and I would forever be embroiled in a blood feud. A friend, cognizant of my prowess for writing, suggested I follow the path of Clark Kent.

    What's your role at the Orlando Sentinel?
      
    These days, I serve on the Editorial Board, writing editorials and managing our online Opinion channel content. I also write an award-winning once-weekly general interest Metro column.

    What type of stories do you cover?
      
    As an editorial writer, I write institutional opinion pieces about legislative issues, criminal justice, K-12 education issues and more. As a columnist, I write about whatever tickles my fancy that week, from poignant pieces about my family life, politics, education, race, religion, social commentary, social justice, mentoring, homelessness, etc.

    Are your stories usually assigned or do you select what you cover?
      
    Both. I generally generate ideas for editorials, but my supervisor can assign ideas. And with my column, I steer the ship, with occasional course corrections from the powers that be.

    Do you have a "favorite" aspect of your job - - something you like best about it?
      
    Because of my fondness for narrative writing, I simply enjoy telling the stories of ordinary Janes and Joes, stories of succeeding against all odds, human stories of failing and rising like the phoenix, and stories where the ending is the ending we all ultimately face. No one gets out of this life alive, and the stories of people facing that prospect, sooner than later, are often the most compelling and instructional.
      
    What would you say to a PR professional who wants to pitch you a story?
      
    Have a firm grasp of what you intend to pitch. Know your stuff. Know your target. Avoid carpet-bombing the ranks of a particularly media organization. Pick one — the right writer whose beat lends itself to the subject — and make your pitch. If no luck, then move on. Few things rankle reporters more than turf wars that start over stories PR professionals pitch to multiple writers at the same time.  And I prefer receiving pitching by email. It’s easy to file and retain the information that way, and I can review the information on my time, not having to be brusque with someone who calls on deadline.

    What's the best way for someone in PR to start a working relationship with you?

    I like gadgets...No, seriously, the best way is contact me with a story that falls in my wheelhouse and be on your game: have the information I need to make the story meaningful to my readers, be accessible if I need additional  information, and be accessible throughout the process until the story appears in the paper. That builds trust.

    What is the toughest part about being a journalist?
      
    These days, watching our ranks go the way of the dinosaur, thanks to changes in the way people consume information and the democratization of information by the Internet.

    What has been the most challenging assignment to cover?
      
    My most challenging assignment was covering the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, gathering at the makeshift morgue where coroners tried to ID bodies, watching broken people trying to find their lost pets at a makeshift pet shelter, watching a man push a shopping cart of government ice five miles to share with home-bound residents of a ramshackle housing project.

    Is there a career highlight that stands out?
      
    I’ve won both national and state first-place awards for column writing, but my career highlight was writing a story about homeless children “shopping” for school clothes at a shelter’s store, preparing for the first day of school. Though the story wasn’t a plea for contributions, readers contributed about $45K to the shelter to help those kids after the story published. Cool.

    What's your advice for someone thinking of becoming a journalist and also for someone who's just starting out?
      
    In this current incarnation of journalism, it makes sense to ground yourself in the digital realm. Become versed in social media, learn how to shoot and edit video, and learning web design won’t hurt. And oh, yeah, hone your writing craft. Though writing is often tertiary to Facebook and Twitter and video web clicks, you still need to be able to tell a good and compelling story.
     
    Do you use social media in your job? What do you like most and least about it?
      
    Yes, we use Facebook to promote our editorials and my columns, and to engage readers in discussion. I like the immediacy of response, but I dislike the often ill-informed and sometimes Cro-Magnon responses legitimate issues often provoke.

    What tips do you have for members in responding to ProfNet queries? 

    I find it best that responders to my ProfNet requests do so via email, and with the email provide the proposed source’s name, title, affiliation, credentials and phone/email contacts. If your proposed source is up to snuff, I then can follow-up at my leisure.

    What type of experts do you prefer to work with? Do you prefer someone with a bigger title or can it be someone other than a company president or CEO, for example?
      
    It depends on the story/issue. Sometimes it’s good to seek out the big cheese, but the head honcho isn’t’ always the most conversant/quotable person either.

    Have you ever thought of doing anything other than journalism?
      
    Yes. I’d give this all up to be a blues guitarist traveling with Robert Cray or Buddy Guy. If only I could play the guitar.
     
    What do you do in your spare time?
      
    Spare time?

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, or get timely experts and story ideas by email. Both are free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    PR Newswire for Journalists Gets a Makeover

    Tuesday, February 11, 2014, 2:43 PM [General]
    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    If you use PR Newswire for Journalists, get ready for some major enhancements!

    The updates won’t affect your current newsfeed, but PR Newswire for Journalists will have a new look and functionality.

    We’re making it easier for you to search, customize and view content on any device you’re using. PR Newswire for Journalists will be optimized for ALL devices (mobile, iPad, etc.)

    When you do a search, you can save it to instantly create a customized newsfeed.

    We’ve also cut out the time it will take you to search for news releases from a specific company or organization. Every news release will give you headline links to other recent announcements from the same organization.

    Lastly, you can connect with other journalists and stay up on the latest media trends via our Community Page. This will feature a media-focused blog, industry news and moves, job listings and more.

    What won't change: You’ll still be able to create customized newsfeeds of news you want when you want it. You’ll have the same access to thousands of photos and images from our multimedia archive, as well as the ability to search our news release archive and company contacts section.

    The ProfNet experts service will continue to be easily accessible through the PR Newswire for Journalists site. Hundreds of thousand of experts will be available to provide quotes and expert opinion for your stories.

    Our award-winning site has proven to be an excellent resource for journalists and we’re making it feel and function better than ever. Email us at MediaSite@prnewswire.com with any questions.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, or get timely experts and story ideas by email. Both are free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    The New ProfNet on PR Newswire for Journalists

    Friday, February 7, 2014, 3:49 PM [General]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    For over 20 years, you’ve trusted ProfNet to help find the experts you need, and now we’re introducing enhancements that will make it even easier to help you find those experts.

    Here's a sneak peek:

    Your ProfNet Inbox will provide access to all your queries. You can access them at any time to re-send them or turn them off:

     

    Via the Query Preferences tab, you can set distribution preferences for all your queries. If you always cloak your queries, you can make that your default preference for all queries. The same can be done with organization types and regions, saving you time and effort:

     

    After sending a query, you can also supplement your search via the experts database on our ProfNet Connect network, with thousands and thousands of experts:

     

    Also, if you access ProfNet via the PR Newswire for Journalists site, your name, news organization, and email address will automatically populate, saving you even more time.

    The new design is also optimized for all devices (mobile, iPad, etc.), making it easier to use ProfNet from any location:

    Not yet a ProfNet user? Go to media.prnewswire.com and click on the “Get Started Now” button to fill out a simple form with your basic information:

     

    Once you’ve logged onto the site, just look for the ProfNet Experts tab.

    If you have any questions about using ProfNet on PR Newswire for Journalists, our team is always ready to help. Just email us at profnet@profnet.com. And stay tuned here for more information next week.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    Introducing the New and Improved PR Newswire for Journalists

    Wednesday, February 5, 2014, 1:11 PM [General]
    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    If you use PR Newswire for Journalists, get ready for an even better experience! The site is about to get some major improvements beginning Feb. 14.

    We’ve enhanced to greatly improve ease-of-use, making it simpler for you to search, customize, and view content on the device of your choice. These updates will not affect your current newsfeed, but the site itself will have a new look, feel, and functionality.

    Some of the new features include:

    • Responsive design optimized for all devices (mobile, iPad, etc.);
    • The ability to instantly create a customized newsfeed from any search;
    • Every news release provides headline links to other recent announcements from the same company;
    • A new Community Page that helps you keep up with your peers and trends with a media-focused blog, media job listings and moves, and industry news.

    What won’t change: You will have the same access to the news release archive, ProfNet experts, photos and company logos and company contacts, and will still be able to select the type of news you want, when you want it.

    If you don’t use PR Newswire for Journalists, now’s the time to get started! Check out this video for a quick sneak peek:

    Questions? PR Newswire’s media relations team is ready to help set up your newsfeed or provide any other assistance you need to get the most out of the upgraded site. Simply send a note to Media.Relations@prnewswire.com.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.

    Media 411: How the Same Scripted Story Can Air in So Many Places

    Thursday, January 30, 2014, 3:44 PM [Media 411]
    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    If you watch Conan O’Brien you’ll know he has an amusing segment that pokes fun at various news stations across the country that all seem to have news anchors reading the exact same script to one particular story. To most people, it seems pretty hilarious and unoriginal and those late night talk shows would make it seem like it’s a terrible thing, but is there really something wrong with it?

    Local newscast producers try to vary their shows with material that isn’t limited to their general area.  A big story could be happening in a city other than their own and the affiliate from their network in the city where the story is happening could simply share the video and script with any of the other affiliates.

    This happens a lot with feature stories or entertainment stories where the network may send one affiliate’s story on a feed and that story gets picked up by the other affiliates. Those scripts are easily shared and there you have the story that everyone seems to have which makes it onto shows like “Conan.”

    I found the perfect explanation for how the same stories end up on newscasts around the country right here on Patrick’s Place. It explains perfectly why this can happen and if there’s really a problem when it does.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, or get timely experts and story ideas by email. Both are free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com.


    Page 5 of 42  •  Prev 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 ... 42 Next