Evelyn Tipacti

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    • Title:Community Editor
    • Organization:ProfNet Connect (PR Newswire)
    • Area of Expertise:Media Relations, Hispanic Media
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    Upcoming #ConnectChat: Social Media Marketing for BtoB and BtoC

    Monday, April 28, 2014, 3:30 PM [#ConnectChat]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Our next #ConnectChat, "Social Media Marketing for BtoB and BtoC" will feature Amanda Peterson, (@AmandaPeterson), the corporate communications coordinator for Petmate.

    Amanda will discuss the key differences between social media marketing for BtoB and BtoC, preparing a strategy, tailoring messages to each social media platform and much more.

    The chat will take place Tuesday, April 29 18, from 3 to 4:30 p.m, EDT. To submit questions for Amanda in advance, please email profnetconnect@prnewswire.com or tweet your question to @ProfNet or @editorev.

    We'll try to get to as many questions as we can. Of course, you can also ask your question live during the chat. To help you keep track of the conversation, we’ll use the #connectchat hashtag. Please use that hashtag if you are tweeting a question or participating in the chat.

    If you can't make it to the chat, don't worry -- a transcript will be provided on ProfNet Connect the next day.

    About Amanda Peterson

    Amanda Peterson is the Corporate Communications Coordinator for Petmate in Arlington, Texas – her dream job since she has four dogs!

    A native to the Dallas-Fort Worth area, she received a Bachelor of Arts in Communication – Journalism from the University of Texas at Arlington.

    Amanda previously worked as a writer for Horse & Rider magazine and as the social media community manager for FedEx Office. Find her on Twitter at @AmandaPeterson or follow Petmate @PetmateProducts.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    Journalist Spotlight: Los Angeles Times' Catharine Hamm

    Friday, April 25, 2014, 12:17 PM [Spotlight]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Welcome to our SPOTLIGHT feature, where we highlight a journalist and ProfNet user to share their personal story and insight with you.

    This SPOTLIGHT belongs to Catharine Hamm, travel editor at the Los Angeles Times.

    Hamm has been with the Los Angeles Times Travel section since 1999, serving as travel editor since 2003.

    Her peripatetic career (newspapers in Kansas, Missouri and California) mirrors her peripatetic life: She was born in New York, and by the time she settled in Los Angeles, she’d had 34 addresses, including  Virginia, Hawaii, the Philippines, Kansas (where she earned her B.A. in Spanish) and Spain.

    The Times' Travel section has won the Lowell Thomas Award for best newspaper section five times during her tenure. Her favorite destination? Always the place she’s going next.

    We hope you find SPOTLIGHT both enjoyable and informative.

    Did you always want to be a journalist?

    Yes, I just didn’t know it. I thought I wanted to follow in my father’s footsteps and work with veterans in helping obtain benefits after their service. But one day I realized that my mother’s side of the family—the Irish side—loves nothing better than telling a story and that I did too.  It took me awhile to figure out that I could take what came naturally and make a living doing it.

    Where was your first job?

    My very first job was sorting Multiple Listing Service cards in a real estate office. I was about 16. My first newspaper job was not in writing but in production. This was some time ago, so newspapers—and this was a six-day-a-week small-town paper—still pasted up pages. I did that for a year.

    Please tell us about what you do at the Los Angeles Times.

    As editor of the Travel section, I select and do a final edit on stories and work on the design and photo processes. For online, I am the editor of the blog. For both print and online, I write a weekly consumer column and occasionally other stories.

    What are your favorite stories to cover?

    Those that make me say, “Wow -- I never thought of that.” Being in travel journalism is like being in school every day. I could have been a perpetual student at an institution of higher education, but instead chose something that allows me to be in a classroom of sorts each day.

    Do you make suggestions as to what stories you cover or are they assigned most of the time?

    Yes, I do make suggestions and assignments. We know our readers (we think) and we generally know what is trending in travel. The trick is to put the two together in a way that interests a million people each Sunday.

    What advice do you have for PR professionals who want to pitch you a story?

    This is difficult for PR people, but this age of email and social media has created an expectation of intimacy, which means knowing us or at least our market. Thus, a customized pitch will go a long way in furthering whatever the cause might be. That means that if the rest of the country is in the grip of the polar vortex, that’s the rest of the country -- that’s not us. When we get “escape the polar vortex” email pitches, they go immediately into the electronic circular file.

    What should they always do and never do?

    Always: Put the geography into the subject line or at least the lead of the pitch. I am amazed at how many pitches I get that say, “Visit XYZ hotel/restaurant/attraction” and expect us to know where XYZ thing is. Often the pitch never says and that is not helpful.

    Never: I appreciate the sentiment of “hope you are well” or “have a great weekend” or “hope your weekend was fantastic,” but please don’t. Please. I’ve heard this from others as well. You don’t know what the person on the receiving end is dealing with and sometimes, you haven’t had a great weekend or you’re not well or your weekend is going to be rot. I think this is a dangerous practice.

    What's the best way for someone in PR to start a working relationship with you?

    PR and media -- online, print, whatever -- must work more as a team. The PR people I work best with are the ones who will lend a hand to me and that is how the relationship usually starts. When I ask a question, for instance, and the answer isn’t one that is available, say so. Don’t just ignore it. The honesty, along with the help, can start a great relationship.

    Do you have advice for members who respond to ProfNet queries?

    I understand that sometimes there is wiggle room in the way a query is written, but there are times when the response to the request is way out in left field. If, for instance, I ask for an expert on tipping etiquette, I am not interested in the latest tipping calculator. That’s not the question.

    The other thing is this: If you say that an expert can be available to me -- and that’s great and exciting -- don’t then come back and say that no, in fact, he or she is out of pocket for the rest of the week and can I do the interview middle of next week? Making sure that someone is available before the deadline is very helpful.

    What type of experts do you prefer to work with? Do you prefer someone in a higher level role or is someone else acceptable?

    I’ll work with anyone who wants to provide informed answers to questions. I’ve had some amazing interviews with experts who just blow me away with their expertise and their willingness to educate me so I can educate my readers. I’ve also had a very few who knew less than I did -- and that’s scary because I usually don’t know much. No expert should ever try to bluff his way through an interview. It’s terribly damaging to his or her reputation and it’s a time waster for both of us.

    What is the toughest part about covering travel?

    Travel journalism in its highest form is a combination of news reporting and consumer reporting. First and foremost, you need facts -- travel reporting isn’t just what we call the “rosy fingers of dawn” -- that is, watching the sun rise over (fill in the blank) place. It’s history, culture, people and world events; it’s the attractions we want to visit and those that are lesser known. Couple that with the consumer aspect of reporting. You are essentially telling people how to spend their time and money so you must become -- very quickly -- an expert.

    It’s an amazing responsibility that sometimes leaves me breathless, even while so grateful to be doing it.

    What has been the most difficult assignment to cover?

    Probably my trip back to the Philippines in 2012. I had lived there as a child. Upon my return more than 45 years later, everything had changed and nothing had changed. I have a great affection for the country and especially its people, but my heart broke when I came face to face with some of the same horrible living conditions that existed in 1966. Many of the same social, economic and political issues continue to hold back this beautiful country. I wanted to weep.

    Do you use social media as part of your job?

    Yes, especially Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest.

    What's your advice for someone thinking of going into journalism and also for someone who's just starting out in the business?

    Always overreact and always over report. By overreacting, I don’t mean having a meltdown, but when a situation arises, do more than you think you need to do at that moment. You may not need the information at that moment, but you will have it (or the muscle memory) in your hip pocket for a time when you do need it. By over reporting, you will be able to write with confidence and authority, which is not to say arrogance. Plus you get to check facts and points of views with several sources. The key to over reporting, though, is to do just enough of it and to not let it become an obsession because otherwise you’ll never get finished.

    Travel is not just your job but your life! You've lived everywhere!

    There are many places I’ve been lucky to live. The downside: When people ask me where I’m from and their eyes glaze over after about 15 minutes, I know I’ve crossed the TMI (too much info) line.

    Besides traveling, what do you like to do when you're not at the office?

    I love gardens and I love to garden. I love and hate computers and seem to spend an inordinate amount of time making them do things I want them to do. Most of all, I love my family and want to spend as much time with them as I can. Luckily -- or not -- they are spread all over the country, so seeing them means -- what else? -- travel.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    Media 411: Copy Editors: Human vs. Automated?

    Thursday, April 17, 2014, 3:00 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Having a job in journalism these days is not easy as more and more is required for those who report the news and make sure it reaches the masses.

    If you’re a writer, a copy editor is someone you rely on -- that extra set of eyes which inspect and analyze your copy and make it better. It’s the one person who understands what you’re trying to say and helps you say it better than you thought possible.

    What if you no longer had that cushion and instead had to rely on an automated copy editor? What if the role of a copy editor became just a memory and software was the only thing available? I shudder to think!

    However, with fewer journalists in most newsrooms these days, they really do a lot more than ‘just’ write the news. Now they have to also play the role of copy editor and perhaps rely on popular software to get the job done.

    Copy editors are vital. Software cannot replace a human, but call me old school. I’m a fan of copy editors. Copy editors are at risk with each newsroom cut and that means a possible loss of quality of product. Software cannot grasp the sentimentality of what a reporter needs or wants to say and it cannot detect accuracy. Only a human can tell if what a reporter has written should even be part of a story.

    I can understand if one uses software as additional backup, not as a replacement. Software may be a good idea for a freelancer but for a huge media company, I will always believe that a real person is always the best choice.

    For more on this topic and the inspiration for today’s Media 411, please click here for the article from the American Journalism Review.

    What do you think?

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    Upcoming PR/Media Events

    Friday, April 4, 2014, 3:07 PM [Upcoming Events]
    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    We regularly update our ProfNet Connect calendar to include upcoming events we think will be of interest to PR and media professionals. Here are a few events coming up over the next few weeks. Know of an event coming up? Email us the details and we’ll include in our next post.

    Event: A Conversation With Chicago’s Leading Health Care Journalists
    Host: Publicity Club of Chicago
    Date: April 9
    Location: Chicago
    Summary: Chicago's leading health care reporters talk about what makes a great story, how you can stand out from the pack, and what you can do to make sure your next pitch is successful.
    Complete event info here

    Event: Investigating Stockbrokers and Financial Advisers
    Host: Reynolds Center for Business Journalism
    Date: April 9
    Location: Online
    Summary: Learn whether stockbrokers or investment advisers have run afoul of regulators or been the subject of customer complaints. This one-hour webinar will guide you through the FINRA BrokerCheck database and the SEC’s Investment Adviser registration database. You’ll also learn how state securities regulators police the industry and how to obtain results of their investigations for your stories.
    Complete event info here

    Event: Powering B2B Marketing Campaigns Through Multimedia
    Host: PR Newswire
    Date: April 9
    Location: Online
    Summary: The B2B buying process has changed. In today’s content-heavy market, you can no longer rely only on brochures to close sales. B2B technology buyers need at least four pieces of content before they make a shortlist of vendors, including white papers, videos, blog posts and much more. This webinar will show you how to think beyond the brochure and use multimedia content to engage leads and convert them into customers.
    Complete event info here

    Event: Disruptive Innovation and Strategic Counsel: Keeping Your Institution (And You) Relevant
    Host: PRSA
    Date: April 9-11
    Location: Washington, D.C.
    Summary: Higher education communicators have a full course load, from dealing with the rise in massive open online courses (MOOCs) to preparing a campus-wide crisis communications program. The PRSA Counselors to Higher Education (CHE) Senior Summit offers creative approaches to keep your communication strategies and tactics cutting edge.
    Complete event info here. 

    Event: Monthly Luncheon
    Host: PRSA Dallas
    Date: April 10
    Location: Dallas
    Summary: Zak Andersen, vice president, corporate relations president, BNSF Foundation, will be the guest speaker.
    Complete event info here. 

    Event: Strategic Corporate Communications Leadership Summit
    Host: IABC
    Date: April 10-11
    Location: Washington, D.C.
    Summary: If you are responsible for corporate communication, public relations, human resources, social media, marketing or organizational effectiveness, join us as we reveal the latest corporate communication strategies, techniques and measurement tools.
    Complete event info here. 

    Event: The Scrappy Factor: How PR Pros Can Achieve More With Less
    Host: PRSA Cincinnati
    Date: April 11
    Location: Cincinnati
    Summary: Virtuoso violinist and keynote speaker Roddy Chong will discuss a phenomenon known as “the scrappy factor,” which is necessary to achieve goals on any stage. Find out how scrappy people, teams and companies can accomplish more and be more effective.
    Complete event info here

    Event: Creating a Strong Brand Identity Through Persuasive Messaging
    Host: NJ CAMA
    Date: April 17
    Location: Princeton, N.J.
    Summary: Whether your business is large or small, a strong brand identity is the key to standing out in a crowded marketplace. Guest speakers will lead an enlightening discussion on creating and maintaining your brand, developing a powerful voice, and how technology can support those efforts.  The event is co-sponsored by the NJ Creative Professionals.
    Complete event info here

    Event: Investigating Government Contractors
    Host: Reynolds Center for Business Journalism
    Date: April 22
    Location: Online
    Summary: Ron Nixon, domestic correspondent in the Washington bureau of The New York Times, will share how to track local and national government spending on contractors in public databases.
    Complete event info here

    Event: Supercharge Your Content: Writing and Editing Essentials
    Host: Ragan Communications
    Date: April 22
    Location: Online
    Summary: Grammar Girl Mignon Fogarty, the famed writing and editing pro featured on Oprah, and Word Czar Rob Reinalda, Ragan Communications executive editor and master wordsmith, will discuss grammar basics, gaffes and memorization techniques.
    Complete event info here. 

    Event: Employing Visual Content for Compelling Storytelling
    Host: PR Newswire
    Date: April 22
    Location: Washington, D.C.
    Summary: This forum will highlight how leading organizations and thought leaders are leveraging visual assets and a variety of multimedia services to garner higher visibility, spark interaction, generate leads and build loyalty. PR Newswire members may use promo code PRN10 to receive a discounted rate of $20.
    Complete event info here. 

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    Media 411: Avoid These Beginner Journalist Mistakes

    Thursday, March 27, 2014, 2:30 PM [Media 411]
    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    The most difficult part of your career is the beginning -- the very first day of your chosen field when you go into the office, hospital, TV station or wherever it is you go and you begin doing what you’ve studied for years.

    If you’re a journalist, it’s a day full of expectations, from family and friends, but mainly from within yourself. You want to do well and prove you’re a good reporter, an excellent writer and that you absolutely deserve to be where you are at that very moment.

    Albeit with all the training you have, there are always ways to improve, regardless of whether you’re a novice or an experienced journalist. The biggest mistake you can make is thinking you already know everything. You don’t.

    If you’re just starting out as a reporter, this list will provide you with links to some really great clips with information that can help you avoid making the mistakes many newbies make.

    Do you have any tips for those starting their journalism careers?

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    How to Get a Free Pass to ASJA. (Hint: It's Easy.)

    Monday, March 24, 2014, 1:06 PM [General]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Would you like a free registration to this year’s American Society of Journalists and Authors conference in New York?

    All you have to do is follow our company page on LinkedIn and join our group, ProfNet: The Expert Connection. Under the group discussion, "Tips for ProfNet Users,” share your best tip for using ProfNet to either find sources or get quoted.

    On Friday, March 28, we’ll take all the names of people who left tips and will pick one person at random to receive the free pass. We’ll announce the lucky person via LinkedIn.

    Good luck!

    SPOTLIGHT: Mark Guarino, The Christian Science Monitor

    Monday, March 24, 2014, 9:47 AM [Spotlight]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Welcome to our SPOTLIGHT feature, where we highlight a journalist and ProfNet user to share their personal story and insight with you.

    This SPOTLIGHT belongs to Mark Guarino, a staff writer with The Christian Science Monitor where he covers national news and culture out of Chicago.

    His byline has also run in Reuters, Salon, the Chicago Tribune, the Chicago Sun-Times, New York Magazine, Agence France-Press (AFP), and other media outlets.

    We hope you find SPOTLIGHT both enjoyable and informative.

     

    Where was your first job as a journalist?

    I worked as a copy editor for a suburban daily newspaper outside Chicago. Although before then, I was a prolific freelance writer. I wrote for anyone and everyone — weekly and daily newspapers, industry trade magazines, you name it.

    Did you know you wanted to be a journalist when you were a kid? 

    I knew I was drawn to reading and telling stories. I saw the world through storytelling and understood the power of possessing skills that can reveal truths to people that may not necessarily be evident. I also grew up in the Chicago area, which obviously has such a rich newspaper tradition, plus is a fertile place for finding and telling stories.

    Please tell us about what you do at The Christian Science Monitor.

    I cover national news from the central part of the United States. Which mean that, depending on the day or week, I’ll be covering crime in Chicago, a federal trial in Detroit, a union issue in Wisconsin, or a disaster in downstate Illinois. My reach often extends further South to New Orleans, where I’ve covered the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, post-Katrina issues, the mayoral race, and more.

    What type of stories do you usually cover?

    The Monitor specializes in an analysis approach to journalism, meaning that, besides giving readers the essential information from the ground, it digs deeper to provide a wider context. So while much of the work involves straightforward news gathering, we also tend to take a few steps and talk about the “why” of the story, and then move onto the “how.” I also have a strong culture background, so am always pursuing stories that talk about the headlines but from a cultural perspective.

    Do you make suggestions as to what stories you cover or are they assigned most of the time?

    I’m very self-generating in the coverage because I’m on the ground and have the sources, from Chicago all the way south to New Orleans. Also, we are driven by what’s trending online, so it becomes obvious what’s important to cover that day. But there are also times when the editors have an area they need covered that day, or week; this is especially true during an election season when there are so many issues to cover.

    What type of stories do you like to cover the most?

    I like covering stories that may seem small but tell a bigger story. The Monitor is great because it thrives on talking about the news from the ground up, opposed from the top down. So I’m drawn to stories that may be about a street corner, or originate from the front porch, but reflect a bigger issue, such as gentrification, the economy, or whatever. I also love culture stories that spin off from the news, like a story I did once that talked about why a Mother’s Day shooting at a street parade in New Orleans was particularly hurtful in that city due to the sanctity of life that parading culture represents.

    What advice do you have for PR professionals who want to pitch you a story?

    Email only, please.

    What should they always do and never do?

    Spend a few minutes to ask yourself these questions: Is this the best person or outlet for this story? That would avoid pitches sent to me that ask me to write about a nightclub opening in Miami.

    What's the best way for someone in PR to start a working relationship with you?

    No-pressure emails are best. Just be a human being and show you actually know the person and the publication you’re writing.

    What tips do you have for members in responding to ProfNet queries? 

    Please don’t linger: I’m usually on a tight deadline and so expediency is best. The deadline in the query is the actual deadline. Also, don’t pitch experts that obviously have nothing to do with the query, or who may provide insight that is tangential at best.

    What type of experts do you prefer to work with? Do you prefer someone in a higher level role or is someone not as high acceptable? The difference between a CEO and general manager, for example?

    Non-partisan experts are preferred, not necessarily activists. Also experts who are actually experts, not someone who read about it in the media and can offer thoughts. Title doesn’t matter, but having a deep understanding of the issue does.

    What's the best part about your job?

    Being paid to gain a deeper understanding of how the world works.

    What is the toughest part about being a journalist?

    I can’t think of an obvious complaint, other than it’s discouraging to read chatter about how biased journalists are, or that journalism is dying. The first could not be further from the truth (at least from my experience) and the second is premature. That stuff is usually driven by ideologues who don’t understand what journalists do (ask questions, connect dots), or people who don’t understand what the world would be like if journalism suddenly vanished.

    What has been the most difficult assignment to cover?

    Picking apart the minutiae that was the Gulf of Mexico oil spill to understand what was happening to write about it with clarity and authority for readers. That story had so many dimensions involving environmental engineering, maritime law, biological science, energy management, coastal ecology — Many areas general assignment journalists do not typically cover but were required to understand as that story developed each day, and is still developing as the legal battle continues in federal court.

    Do you use social media as part of your job?

    I vet people via social media, and sometimes scan it for sources. I also push out my stories on all platforms to help them circulate.

    What's your advice for someone thinking of going into journalism and also for someone who's just starting out in the business?

    You have to have passion for people and the issues that affect their lives. This is not a field for people who do not have an inherent curiosity about people or about how the world works. You can learn how to report, but you need to learn how to tell a story, which are two separate things. Also, checking the credibility of your sources is more critical than you think, especially today since the online world is full of shadows.

    What do you like to do when you're not at the office?

    I’m a music fan, so spend a lot of time in record stores or music clubs or theaters.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    Media 411: Ways Journalists Can Use Facebook

    Thursday, March 20, 2014, 2:38 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Last week's Media 411 focused on how journalists can make the best use of Twitter --  I was happily surprised at the amount of interest it received, so this week I'm sharing a list of lists of the top 10 best ways journalists can and should use Facebook.

    Hope these help!

    How Journalists Can Use Facebook Graph Search for Reporting (Facebook)

    Five Ways Journalists Can Use Facebook (About.com)

    Facebook for news: maximising the effectiveness of Facebook newsgathering (Storyful)

    Three Ways Journalists Can Use Facebook (Business 2 Community)

    6 ways journalists can increase Facebook response (Easy Media)

    5 Ways Journalists Can Use Facebook’s Interest Lists (10,000 Words)

    Six tips for journalists on using Facebook for reporting (ICFJ)

    Facebook for Journalists (Alaska Media Lab)

    Facebook + Journalists (Melbourne Press Club)

    14 Tips for Journalists on Facebook (Mediashift)

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    Media 411: Ways Journalists Can Use Twitter

    Friday, March 14, 2014, 3:17 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Everyone loves a top ten list so this week I've created a list of lists (wink) of the top 10 best ways journalists can and should use Twitter.

    Take a look, enjoy and don't be afraid to use a medium which has revolutionized the way journalists work every single day.

    1) The Journalist's Guide to Twitter (Mashable)

    2) 10 ways journalists can use Twitter before, during and after reporting a story (Poynter) 

    3)10 ways Twitter is valuable to journalists (The Buttry Diary)

    4) Best Practices for Journalists (Twitter)

    5) Erica Anderson’s 6 Tips for Journalists on Twitter (Mediashift)

    6) 10 Ways Journalists and the Media Use Twitter (The Next Web)

    7) Why Use Twitter: A Journalist’s Defense (BruceClay.com)

    8) Journalists Find That Twitter Can Be An Effective Reporting Tool (About.com)

    9) 10 Ways Journalists Can (and Should) Use Twitter (OC Metro)

    10) 5 Ways Journalists Can Use Twitter (Journalistics)

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    Upcoming #ConnectChat: Protecting Yourself As a Freelance Writer

    Thursday, March 13, 2014, 2:19 PM [#ConnectChat]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Our next #ConnectChat, "Protecting Yourself As a Freelance Writer" will feature Randy Dotinga, (@rdotinga), a freelance writer and vice president of the American Society of Journalists and Authors (ASJA).

    Randy will discuss the many issues freelancers need to worry about including copyright concerns, lawsuits involving libel, insurance and many other topics specific to freelancers as well as touch upon the ASJA's annual conference coming up in New York next month.

    The chat will take place Tuesday, March 18, from 3 to 4:30 p.m, EDT. To submit questions for Randy in advance, please email profnetconnect@prnewswire.com or tweet your question to @ProfNet or @editorev.

    We'll try to get to as many questions as we can. Of course, you can also ask your question live during the chat. To help you keep track of the conversation, we’ll use the #connectchat hashtag. Please use that hashtag if you are tweeting a question or participating in the chat.

    If you can't make it to the chat, don't worry -- a transcript will be provided on ProfNet Connect the next day.

    About Randy Dotinga

    Randy Dotinga, vice president of the American Society of Journalists and Authors and co-chair of the 2014 ASJA conference, has been a full-time freelance writer for 15 years.

    He currently writes for publications including Kaiser Health News, WebMD and Newsday and has been a book reviewer for The Christian Science Monitor since 2005.

    He also writes a daily newsletter for Voice of San Diego, a non-profit investigative news outlet. His specialties include medicine and science, politics, the odd and unusual, and history.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com


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