Evelyn Tipacti

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    • Title:Community Editor
    • Organization:ProfNet Connect (PR Newswire)
    • Area of Expertise:Media Relations, Hispanic Media
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    Building Your Expert Brand Through Books

    Wednesday, September 3, 2014, 2:45 PM [#ConnectChat]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    On Tuesday, Sept. 2, we hosted our latest #ConnectChat, "Building Your Expert Brand Through Books," with Ashley Jones, director of marketing and business development at Greenleaf Book Group.

    Jones discussed the biggest mistakes beginners make, whether you need a lot of money to promote your brand, increasing visibility, and much more.

    Please follow @ProfNet and @editorev on Twitter for more information on future chats or check back right here on ProfNet Connect for details.

    Ashley, please tell us about Greenleaf Book Group and what your role is there.

    Greenleaf is an exciting place. Our goal is to help people with big ideas grow into recognized thought leaders. We are a hybrid book publisher and we bring together the best aspects of traditional and self-publishing. Greenleaf authors have access to our strong distribution team keep creative control, IP and most of the royalties. We also help authors think beyond the book and leverage their ideas and content in new ways.

    The book publishing industry is so competitive. How do you distinguish yourself and your books from everyone else?

    Books are an important thought-leadership cornerstone. To stand out, authors need an online platform and audience building. Tactics like exclusive content for email lists, feedback from beta audiences, and videos to expand messages go a long way. An audience who supports the book when it launches is a huge advantage. They are like passionate partners.

    What does branding and marketing mean for authors?

    Authors engage in marketing all of the time. Book signings, social media, or paid advertising are good examples. While some authors recoil at “marketing,” it’s about helping people who are interested in the author’s expertise and relationship building. Branding is part of marketing. A brand is the meaning audiences attribute to a product, service, or individual.

    Do you need a lot of money to effectively promote your brand?

    There are lots of brand-building tactics that authors can engage in without spending a lot of money. Authors can leverage social media, attract audiences and use creative tactics to engage their audiences. Many tactics are free or inexpensive, if an author is willing to put the energy and time into them.

    How can Greenleaf help an independent author build their brand?

    For authors, building brands is about knowing the audience, creating a strong message, and sharing that message. Greenleaf works with independent authors to build the right kind of brand to attract a loyal audience. The tactics we recommend depend on the author, their message, and the audience they should be reaching.

    For example, a fiction author would be likely to have a very different approach than a business author.

    We focus on creating a strategy, building assets like a website, a presentation, and social media presence, and finding the audience.

    What are some steps a new author can take to increase their visibility so media and others see them as experts in their fields?

    Building an expert brand can be challenging. The most important step is to determine audience and message. Next, it's key to make yourself look like an expert with an online presence, public speaking, and media presence. Media attention can be garnered through sites like PR Newswire or direct outreach to the press. We also recommend working with PR agencies -- a good publicist can help to build media buzz, which is invaluable.

    Would you consider blogging an effective way for someone to promote their book and expertise?

    Blogging is a GREAT tool for all authors. It is a venue to share ideas with a wider audience. Blogging helps to build SEO value (so you can be found online), credibility, and connect with an audience. If treated correctly, your devoted blog audience will be the first people to read and promote your book.

    What are the biggest mistakes beginners make when it comes to brand?

    There are two big mistakes I see authors make when building their brands, and there are easy ways to avoid both: 1) Building brand elements (i.e., website, business cards) before getting clear on a message or plan; 2) Not sticking to a brand-building plan. It's easy to get distracted; make a plan and stick to it.

    It's easy to see how authors make these mistakes. Building a brand is hard work and it’s easy to lose focus. To avoid these mistakes, authors should create and stick to a plan where each step connects to long-term goals. Having a branding professional on your team helps. We know what mistakes to watch out for, the best timing, and what to focus on.

    Let's take a step back. How can someone develop enough content to write a book to start their journey as an expert and build their brand?

    Most people who are considering a book are surprised to find that they already have content that they can use. I love blogging as a first step -- blogging is a great way to organize and share ideas and test them on an audience. Greenleaf also helps authors to evaluate their ideas and gives feedback on concepts submitted to us.

    Do people who want to work with Greenleaf need to have some of their work already published before you consider them?

    No, many Greenleaf authors are first-time authors. We are highly selective, but we love working with new authors.

    Some people may think this is an overnight process, but how long can it take for a new author to become a trusted expert?

    Brand building is often a long process. Ask anyone who is an overnight success. They'll tell you it took years. Experts can avoid wasting time by starting their brand on the right foot -- a clear message and strong online assets.

    Speaking opportunities are a good way to get visibility. How can someone go about getting those opportunities or increasing them?

    Authors who want to speak need a professional presentation and a great topic to speak on. Audiences want to hear about ideas, not about the book -- they want a topic that is exciting, not a sales pitch. With a good topic and presentation, reach out to your local @NSAspeakers chapter or speakers bureau for opportunities.

    Do you recommend that an author partner with another more successful one?

    Partnerships with other authors, businesses, or organizations are always beneficial for new authors. Those brands have audiences who may be excited about a new author's ideas -- access to their audience is great. It's key for new authors to think about what they can offer partners. Speaking or promotion are a few options.

    What role does social media play? What should an author be doing to drive sales and visibility?

    Social media is great for building interest and sharing ideas. Staying active and sharing relevant info is key.

    It's key to give value to an audience, not be focused on self-promotion. People love authors who provide value. That's true everywhere, especially in social media. I want to follow someone who gives me great info. Don't you? Social is helpful in book sales, but it's not a direct link. Social media is about relationships, not sales. That said, authors with truly strong social media followings often see strong book sales.

    Greenleaf Book Group has a conference coming up. What's it about?

    Greenleaf's Summit is about helping authors build brands, books, and connect with each other. We'll go into details about the topics above, and others for new and experienced authors.

    When and where is it and how can an author register?

    The summit is in Austin, Texas, Sept. 25-26. Details at greenleafauthorsummit.com

    Anyone viewing this chat can use discount code PROFNET for a 33% discount on tickets. For more info, reach out to Greenleaf on Twitter or email us at authorsummit@greenleafbookgroup.com.

    Upcoming #ConnectChat: Building Your Expert Brand Through Books

    Thursday, August 28, 2014, 12:50 PM [General]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Our next #ConnectChat, "Building Your Expert Brand Through Books" will feature Ashley Jones, (@GreenleafBookGR), the director of marketing and business development at Greenleaf Book Group in Austin, Texas.

    Ashley will discuss how to establish yourself as an expert, building a brand through your book(s), growing your audience and much more.

    The chat will take place Tuesday, September 2 from 3 to 4:30 p.m, EDT. To submit questions for Ashley in advance, please email profnetconnect@prnewswire.com or tweet your question to @ProfNet or @editorev.

    We'll try to get to as many questions as we can. Of course, you can also ask your question live during the chat. To help you keep track of the conversation, we’ll use the #connectchat hashtag. Please use that hashtag if you are tweeting a question or participating in the chat.

    If you can't make it to the chat, don't worry -- a transcript will be provided on ProfNet Connect the next day.

    About Ashley Jones

    Ashley is the director of marketing and business development at Greenleaf Book Group.

    She is a results-oriented, creative marketing professional with experience in marketing strategy, brand architecture, and program creation for top brands and thought leaders. Throughout her career, she has created successful marketing campaigns including award-winning advertising and highly targeted word-of-mouth programs. At Greenleaf, she is using her strategic skills to help authors build their brands and connect with audience

    Rachel Weingarten, Media Updates and Health Communications: Top Blogs

    Monday, August 25, 2014, 3:01 PM [TopBlogs]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    ProfNet Connect has a wide variety of informative blog posts each month and today we're highlighting the top posts between August 18 and August 25.

    Write a blog post for ProfNet Connect and you could find your post on our next list!

    Grammar Hammer: "Goodbye" or "Good Bye"? (Grace Lavigne)

    According to Merriam-Webster, the title of this post is actually a trick question: the correct way to write this farewell word is “good-bye.”

    How to Build a Strong Network (Polina Opelbaum)
     
    Many people learn about the power of networking during their professional career. Networking can be the key to building a strong professional relationship with an individual. However, is it more important to network online versus offline these days? Where do you go to connect with professionals? These are all questions we discussed in our last #ConnectChat with Lisa Chau, a social media strategist and PR and marketing consultant.

    Keeping up With the Mompreneur Movement (Polina Opelbaum)

    In our mini-blog series about mompreneurs, we introduced mompreneurs, discussed the marketing done by mompreneurs, and are now ending it with some final suggestions from six mompreneurs. These mompreneurs share their experiences and expertise on the best way to balance being a mom and business owner, the future of the mompreneur movement, as well as any final tips they want to share with moms running or looking to run a business.

    Blog Profiles: Education Blogs (Christine Cube)

    It’s back-to-school time.
    I was scrolling through Facebook when it occurred to me that all of my parent friends, teachers, and school administrators are preparing to return to their classrooms.

    So in this spirit, I dug into the massive world of education blogs and found some great sites. I also stumbled upon an immense universe known as Edublogs, an education blogging service powering more than 2.4 million Edublogs since 2005.
    Say what?

    Grammar Hammer: Every Day I’m Hustlin’… (Cathy Spicer)
    A suggestion from a loyal reader (thanks, Cal!) is the subject of this week’s post. Is it “everyday” (one word) or “every day” (two words)? I’m also an admitted music geek, so I’m always inspired by song titles.
    Both of these words refer to something that occurs on a daily basis. The best way to determine which word to use is always the context in which the word will be used.

    Spotlight: Rachel Weingarten, Lifestyle Writer, Columnist, Author (Evelyn Tipacti)

    This SPOTLIGHT belongs to Rachel Weingarten, an internationally recognized lifestyle writer, style columnist and award-winning author. She’s a prolific freelance writer and weekly style columnist for Parade.com, and opinion columnist for NYC’s most widely read daily newspaper amNewYork.

    MEDIAware: This Week's Media News & Updates (Kevin Frey)

    MEDIAware, PR Newswire’s Audience Research Department weekly newsletter, features recent media changes in the industry. PR Newswire Agility members receive addition contact/outlet information for being members of our Agility community.

    Patient Engagement: The Future of Healthcare Communications (Polina Opelbaum)

    Business Development Institute (BDI) hosted an event about how leading healthcare brands are planning for the future including integrating big data, digital, mobile and social for innovative communications that improve patient outcomes. The event was moderated by Steve Etzler, CEO/founder of BDI. Here are the seven panels and highlights from each panel:

    ProfNet Success Story: Crystal Cooper, Porter Novelli  (Angela Smith)

    I recently caught up with ProfNet member, Crystal Cooper, a senior account executive at public relations firm, Porter Novelli.
    She told me how she continues to gain media exposure for her clients using ProfNet.

    SPOTLIGHT: Yamiche Alcindor, USA Today (Evelyn Tipacti)

    This SPOTLIGHT belongs to Yamiche Alcindor, a breaking news reporter at USA Today who splits her time covering quickly developing incidents and stories about the social issues affecting the United States.

    She’s traveled across the country to cover stories including the school shooting in Newtown, Conn., the Trayvon Martin case, and the hazing scandal at Florida A&M University. She also spends time writing about societal concerns such as human trafficking, civil rights, gun violence, and poverty. She has been a frequent guest on MSNBC, C-SPAN, NPR, America’s Radio News Network and a variety of radio stations and local television stations across the nation.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    Spotlight: Rachel Weingarten, Lifestyle Writer, Columnist, Author

    Thursday, August 21, 2014, 12:47 PM [Spotlight]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Welcome to our SPOTLIGHT feature, where we highlight a journalist and ProfNet user to share their personal story and insight with you.

    This SPOTLIGHT belongs to Rachel Weingarten, an internationally recognized lifestyle writer, style columnist and award-winning author. She’s a prolific freelance writer and weekly style columnist for Parade.com, and opinion columnist for NYC’s most widely read daily newspaper amNewYork. Please read more about Rachel below.

    We hope you find SPOTLIGHT both enjoyable and informative.

    Have you always wanted to be a writer? 

    Haven't we all? ;) I've learned a lot from my interesting career trajectory which included stints as a celebrity makeup artist to founding the first low-fat mini muffin company approved by the FDA. I've taken the skills that I've learned and found a way to pull them all together in my writing.

    What was your first professional writing job?

    I started answering this question several times in several different ways. It occurs to me that there's no one way to be a professional writer these days. So while my magazine writing started under a pseudonym, my copywriting /speechwriting/ghostwriting started when I was still part of the corporate world. Content creation would be way back in the dawn of the internet when I was creating and launching some of the earliest online magazines for designers and cosmetics companies.

    What type of stories do you cover?

    I used to use the tagline "Style is my business," but I feel that I've expanded beyond that. Then I'd sometimes describe myself as writing about "Business and style and the business of style" which opens things up to the business world and business of fashion and beauty. I like to think that I cover all aspects of style, from what you wear to what you say, to where you travel, the things you choose to consume and surround yourself with. I love pop culture and trends and breaking them down to figure out how to help my readers feel more in tune to evolving and emerging trends. So in a nutshell - I'm a style writer with a very elastic description of the word style. I love covering consumer issues, shopping, gifts, the kinds of things that people splurge on. In this way I can advise them on what's hype and what might we a worthwhile investment.

    Can you tell me what a typical day is like in the life of a freelance writer?

    There is no typical day. And just when I think I've got a routine going - it changes. I guess the closest I could tell you is the guy they'd show in old movies who would be at some sort of carnival and spinning dozens of plates at one time. That's the typical day. Brainstorming stories. Reading through the latest releases. Noticing something in my neighborhood or grocery store or various social media feeds and wondering if this is part of a larger trend and then thinking about how to pitch my various editors a story about it. Interviewing sources. Distilling my notes. Answering feedback from my readers.

    I love the fact that no matter which publications I write for, my readers feel that they can write to me for further clarification, need for more information or even with questions. I get so many emails with questions about what to buy or wear for a special occasion. Advice needed on everything from fragrance to home decor. Writing stories. Revising stories. Analyzing my most popular pieces and trying to figure out how to keep on top of my game. Bemoaning the publications in the world that find it acceptable to underpay writers. Taking notes on every conceivable surface and texting myself thoughts at all hours. And then trying to sleep and remembering that I have about 83 emails that I still haven't answered. Oh. And sometimes just trying to write essays for the pleasure of it all.

    What's the biggest misconception people have about freelancing?

    That it's a breezy venture where you put pen to paper or fingers to keyboard and that that's all it is. I'm a business person whose stock in trade happens to be feature stories. I'm my own boss, but I also have many bosses to answer to in the form of editors and publishers.

    What advice do you have for PR professionals who want to pitch you a story?

    Take a minute or two to actually read something I've written recently. I get so many pitches from PR people who read something I wrote a few years back and pitch very specific stories based on my former columns or business needs. Don't try to cram or reform the same pitch that you've pitched every single other person in your address book. It really helps if you can give me an angle that might work for my particular audience.

    What should they always do and never do?

    Contact me in the way that I've mentioned that I prefer. I hate being phone stalked by publicists who have tracked my phone number down somehow. I'm fine chatting if we already have a relationship, but please don't call me numerous times if we've never worked together previously. There is no one definitive way to interact with a writer. So taking the time (when possible, we know you're busy too!) to get to know the foibles and quirks of writers will mean that the overall experience will be so much smoother.

    What's the best way for someone in PR to start a working relationship with you?

    Send me an introduction email. Feel free to pitch me a client or product or ask about the stories I'm working on. Bear in mind that I get hundreds of emails each week with similar pitches, so while I might be swamped, I really do try to respond.

    Do you have advice for members who respond to ProfNet queries?

    Read my request. You'd be amazed at how many PR people will zero in on a single word and then pitch on a topic that has absolutely nothing to do with me or anything I've ever written about.

    Or worse, they'll pitch completely off topic and try to bring in the most tenuous connection to what I truly seek. Also, I have a specific email address that I've set up for ProfNet, so I know if you've been mining the queries for email addresses. Don't add me to your distribution list just because you can. If I work with a publicist I'll give her my work email or personal email thereby ensuring that I have earlier and easier access to future pitches. And whatever you do, please don't send me a link to an article that's been written about the person you're pitching or a link to their website and tell me to read through for more info. I can easily search on my own, my hope is to connect with experts or resources I might not otherwise have had access to or known about.

    What type of experts do you prefer to work with?

    I love quirky people. Anyone who has an interesting background or story or product or niche. I'm not enamored with the blanket message. I love interviewing people who aren't so smooth that they tell the same story to everyone they speak with. I'd rather build a rapport and learn about what makes you or your knowledge or product unique.

    What has been the most difficult assignment to cover?

    I was recently asked by The Guardian to write an editorial about women and money  as part of their Money + Feminism series. I'd been reading a lot about how younger women have rejected the notion of feminism and I find it by turns depressing and anachronistic. Without strong women paving the way for us, we wouldn't be able to make our voices heard professionally. It was hard for me to be dispassionate about the subject and try to present a logical and practical reason to understand and embrace an ongoing conversation about evolving feminism.  bit.ly/rcwguardian

    How do you use social media as part of your job?

    I both love and hate social media. I keep tapped into the pulse of popular topics from TV shows to snack foods and also try to gauge the authenticity of trends. I love sourcing quotes and resources as well. And then there's the shameless self promotion aspect!

    What's your advice for someone thinking of going into freelance writing and also for someone who's just starting out in the business?

    I think you have to really know your strengths and weaknesses. If you're a great writer but poor with time management, it won't work for you. If you have a super thin skin you'll have a hard time dealing with potential rejection from editors and outlets. And please, whatever you do, don't accept jobs that don't pay you or underpay you. There's been a horrible downward spiral for far too long in the industry with major players undervaluing skilled writers by either refusing to pay writers or offering them crumbs instead of payment worthy of their talents. New writers are made to believe that it's worth trading their integrity and talents for exposure. It isn't.

    Are you currently working on something other than your daily assignments?

    Yes! My new book Ancient Prayer: Channeling Your Faith 365 Days of the Year will be published by Fall River Press in September and available exclusively at Barnes and Noble stores and online at BN.com. I am so proud of that book. It tapped into the wisdom of the ages and tries to offer advice for dealing with day to day life. I'm trying to write some related essays, set up appearances and partnerships and events.

    I'm also trying to plan my book party and would love to connect with potential partners or sponsors for events, readings and more.

    More here:ancientprayerbook.com/

    And you can pre-order here bit.ly/AncientPrayer www.barnesandnoble.com/w/ancient-prayer-...

    It's such a gorgeous book. I'm so proud of it!

    Have you ever thought of doing something other than freelance writing? 

    I do! I lead workshops and teach about personal branding and cosmetics and fragrance marketing on the graduate level. I also am a pretty popular public speaker and lead workshops on subjects including business etiquette, communication and personal branding. If I had the head for it or could afford to though, I'd probably go to culinary school. I've taken some classes at ICE and it's transformed the way I interact with food and food preparation. I was always a great cook, but I'd love to become a vegan chef. Either that or starting a non-profit. I'm always finding causes near to my heart and wish I could commit a chunk of change to something I truly believe in.

    What do you do in your free time?

    I'm an avid crafter (my mother opened up a crafts/yarn shop when I was only two) so I'm always crocheting or needle pointing and want to start painting again. I also love traveling and rediscovering my neighborhood and city. I'm a native Brooklynite and I vow that this will be the year that I finally finish my first mystery in what I hope will be a series set in and around my 'hood, The Real Brooklyn Girl mysteries.

    About Rachel Weingarten

    Rachel Weingarten writes mostly about beauty, fashion, style, business, travel, luxury, spa, marketing, pop culture and trends and frequently dabbles in topics that aren’t as easily defined.

    Rachel is the author of written three non-fiction books. In addition to Ancient Prayer: Channeling Your Faith 365 Days of the Year, she’s the author of Career and Corporate Cool (An Entrepreneur magazine pick for book of the year & CareerBuilder pick for most interesting career book of the year) and Hello Gorgeous! Beauty Products in America ’40s-’60s which will hopefully be reissued later this year (A NY Public Library book of the year/book for the teen age). She’s also ghostwritten a handful of other best sellers.

    Rachel has written for top media outlets including CNN Digital, Esquire.com, Forbes Life, Fortune, Fortune Small Business, Four Seasons, Men’s Health, Newsday, Crain’s New York Business, Newsday, The Guardian, USA Today, USA Weekend and many others. She also created and acted as the on-air talent for a show on CNN about women entrepreneurs called Enterprising Women. Rachel leads personal branding workshops at NYU, has lectured about the history of the beauty industry at FIT and created business etiquette & style workshops for Fortune 100 companies.

    You can find Rachel here:

    Facebook: www.facebook.com/RachelWeingarten

    Twitter: @rachelcw

    Email: hi@byrachel.com

    www.racheletc.com
    byrachelweingarten.com
    ancientprayerbook.com

    Mompreneurs, Education Blogs, Building a Strong Network: Top Blogs

    Monday, August 18, 2014, 1:48 PM [General]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    ProfNet Connect has a wide array of great articles each month and today we're highlighting the top posts for August so far. Take a look, enjoy and why not try writing one yourself? You could find your post on our next list!

    Keeping up With the Mompreneur Movement (Polina Opelbaum)

    In our mini-blog series about mompreneurs, we introduced mompreneurs, discussed the marketing done by mompreneurs, and are now ending it with some final suggestions from six mompreneurs. These mompreneurs share their experiences and expertise on the best way to balance being a mom and business owner, the future of the mompreneur movement, as well as any final tips they want to share with moms running or looking to run a business.

    Grammar Hammer: Every Day I’m Hustlin’… (Cathy Spicer)

    A suggestion from a loyal reader (thanks, Cal!) is the subject of this week’s post. Is it “everyday” (one word) or “every day” (two words)? I’m also an admitted music geek, so I’m always inspired by song titles.

    Both of these words refer to something that occurs on a daily basis. The best way to determine which word to use is always the context in which the word will be used.

    Blog Profiles: Education Blogs (Christine Cube)

    It’s back-to-school time.

    I was scrolling through Facebook when it occurred to me that all of my parent friends, teachers, and school administrators are preparing to return to their classrooms.

    So in this spirit, I dug into the massive world of education blogs and found some great sites. I also stumbled upon an immense universe known as Edublogs, an education blogging service powering more than 2.4 million Edublogs since 2005.

    Say what?

    Patient Engagement: The Future of Healthcare Communications (Polina Opelbaum)

    Business Development Institute (BDI) hosted an event about how leading healthcare brands are planning for the future including integrating big data, digital, mobile and social for innovative communications that improve patient outcomes. The event was moderated by Steve Etzler, CEO/founder of BDI. Here are the seven panels and highlights from each panel:

    MEDIAware: This Week's Media News & Updates (Kevin Frey)

    MEDIAware, PR Newswire’s Audience Research Department weekly newsletter, features recent media changes in the industry. PR Newswire Agility members receive addition contact/outlet information for being members of our Agility community.

    ProfNet Success Story: Crystal Cooper, Porter Novelli  (Angela Smith)

    I recently caught up with ProfNet member, Crystal Cooper, a senior account executive at public relations firm, Porter Novelli.

    She told me how she continues to gain media exposure for her clients using ProfNet.

    Want To Be On The Winning Team? 5 Lessons From Fantasy Football (Alexa Manocchio)

    With football season right around the corner and fantasy football on the minds of many pigskin enthusiasts, it’s a great time to take a look at what we can learn from this virtual gridiron to end up on the winning team.

    Cooper Makes an Impression in Times Square (Angela Smith)

    Congratulations to ProfNet member Crystal Cooper who was featured in Times Square as part of our Facebook promotion! Cooper, a senior account executive at public relations firm, Porter Novelli, shared her success stories on our Facebook page as part of our monthly promotion.

    Upcoming #ConnectChat: How to Build a Strong Network (Polina Opelbaum)

    Now more than ever, it is important to know how to connect with professional contacts. The challenge lies in how you build these strong networks. Social media plays a huge role in people meeting each other and forming professional relationships. Yet, it is equally as important to know how to form professional relationships offline and without the use of technology. Lisa Chau, social media strategist and PR and marketing consultant, will explain what and how to use social media when forming connections. Chau will also discuss the importance of not focusing all your efforts on social media when networking.

    Media 411: Journalists Battle First Amendment Violations (Evelyn Tipacti)

    The behavior of the police in Ferguson, Missouri towards the media has been alarming. According to journalists at the scene, police detained and arrested them without justifiable cause and have also assaulted them by throwing tear gas canisters in their direction. Reporters have been told to stop recording and equipment has been tampered with.

    Media 411: Journalists Battle First Amendment Violations

    Friday, August 15, 2014, 10:51 AM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    The behavior of the police in Ferguson, Missouri towards the media has been alarming. According to journalists at the scene, police detained and arrested them without justifiable cause and have also assaulted them by throwing tear gas canisters in their direction. Reporters have been told to stop recording and equipment has been tampered with.

    The shooting death of an unarmed teenager in Ferguson has resulted in violent protests and has attracted media from all over the country. This is an important national story that warrants coverage but journalists are being forcibly censored in violation of the first amendment which protects freedom of the press.

    No matter the event or the reasons for journalists being at a certain location, journalists have the right to cover a story. It is an outrage that journalists after identifying themselves as members of the press have been told to stop recording and have been arrested for – well, for what?

    Wesley Lowery, a reporter with the Washington Post shares his experience in Ferguson here.

    An Al Jazeera America crew had a tear gas canister land directly in front of them and a local TV station was approached by police with guns pointed at them. An account of that event can be read here.

    The police have treated journalists the same way they do criminals. Reporters have the right to cover protests, to write about them and to record images. The ones who are committing the crime here are the officers. Once you identify yourself as media or as a member of the press, you are to be left to do your job as a reporter and to tell your account of what you are witnessing to the masses. It is a first amendment right.

    Several media associations have made statements regarding the events that took place and their words apply to every situation where journalists gather to report on current events. Poynter has shared these statements from the National Press Photographers Association, Al Jazeera, the American Society of News Editors, the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, the Radio Television Digital News Association, Huffington Post and The Washington Post in a post from Thursday.

    When the press is physically assaulted for doing something they have every right to do especially after announcing themselves as ‘press,’ we have a huge problem. The authorities have no right to physically assault or detain a journalist without cause.  This cannot happen again. 

    Photo courtesy of bing.

    Media 411: How Journalists Can Avoid Conflicts of Interest

    Thursday, August 7, 2014, 3:51 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Journalists are human, obviously, making them fallible like everyone else. The difference is that their jobs as journalists require them to be more careful with the decisions they make while covering events, the time they spend with certain people and even the places they go on a night out with the family.

    Some situations are more obvious than others and sometimes you may do something which at the moment seems harmless only to realize maybe it wasn’t the best thing to do, best place to go, etc. It’s happened to most of us.

    They key to protecting yourself is being aware of what a conflict of interest really is and what it means for you as a member of the media. What I’ve shared with you below will hopefully answer any questions you may have or help teach you about avoiding tricky situations.

    Six Ways Journalists Can Avoid Conflicts of Interest (About.com)

    Guidelines for Avoiding Conflict of Interest (RTDNA)

    NPR Ethics Handbook

    The Pulitzer Center Ethics and Standards Policy

    Journalists face conflicts of interest too (The SPJ Generation J Committee Blog)

    Media Ethics (The Writing Lab, Purdue University)

    Pressures on Journalists (The News Manual)

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    Photo Courtesy: Bing

    Media 411: Prepared Newsroom Leaders

    Friday, August 1, 2014, 12:50 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Media 411: Prepared Newsroom Leaders Being a leader is hardly an easy job and whether you are working as a news director or in any type of leadership position in a newsroom, you are expected to handle whatever comes your way in a professional manner.

    Many newsroom leaders are journalists who climbed up the ladder without any leadership training and although good journalists, may not be adequately prepared for being in charge of a staff and a news product. This makes the job difficult not just for the new leader, but also for those who have to report to them.

    The list below includes some of the best articles I’ve found that give excellent advice if you’re in a leadership position or are about to start one. The key to doing well is being prepared.

    Newsroom Leadership (RTDNA)

    ‘It will take passion’: A benediction for tomorrow’s newsroom leaders (Poynter)

    Newsroom leader: Feedback ‘starts with being open to change’ (Reynolds Journalism Institute)

    Why Many Journalists Make Poor Newsroom Leaders (And Ways to Make Them Better) (American Journalism Review)

    Former Seattle Times Executive Editor David Boardman on the evolving role of the editor (World News Publishing Focus) 

    Media 411: Buzzfeed's Best Media Lists

    Friday, July 25, 2014, 2:29 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Buzzfeed lists are everywhere, bringing fits of laughter to all who read them and admire their wit and cleverness.

    The ones most humorous are the ones to which we can relate so I'm sharing Buzzfeed's most hilarious lists associated with media and journalism.

    You're almost sure to find yourself in at least one of these.

    Enjoy!

    31 Undeniable Truths That Journalism Majors Can All Agree On

    22 Things Journalists Know To Be True

    How You Think NPR Reporters Look Vs. How They Actually Do

    This Reporter’s Reaction To Team USA’s Goal Against Ghana Is Perfection

    21 Incredibly Important Social Media Proverbs

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    Best of Spotlight: PR Tips from Media Pros

    Monday, July 21, 2014, 8:28 AM [Spotlight]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Our Spotlight series focuses on journalists and delves into their lives as reporters, writers, and editors. This week instead of highlighting one particular member of the media, I’m taking some of their best quotes to help those who work in PR better understand what journalists need from them and therefore create a relationship that works for both.

    What advice do you have for PR professionals who want to pitch you?

    “I would suggest knowing what I cover and pitching me experts about an incident as quickly as possible. If a school shooting occurs sadly, I know I will likely need someone who can comment and put that tragedy into context. Getting me someone fast is ideal. Also, when stories aren't breaking, pitching me newsy features is also a good idea.” Yamiche Alcindor, USA Today

    “Develop real connections with journalists.  We get over 1,000 emails a day on average so email pitches get lost often.  Network with the press at professional association gatherings or when you see them out in the community.  Talk to them there even when you don’t have something to pitch. Or pitch right on the crest of the news wave.” Jen Christensen, CNN

    “Yes, I do work with them. My advice is nothing new. It’s simply to know who you’re pitching to. PR people are often essential to getting good sources, but a shotgun approach toward their clients isn’t the best idea. Sending me an email about a new way to lose weight isn’t for our site. Getting a pitch on someone who just wrote a book about how their life went from the gutter to the penthouse may be a good story, but it’s not for CNBC.com. Know what stories are done on the site before you send the idea. If it makes sense for us, we’ll be in touch.” Mark Koba, CNBC

    “There's no need to be pushy, or to follow up with numerous e-mails or phone calls. A good story sells itself. The key info should be in the body of an e-mail - most reporters won't bother opening an e-mail attachment. Try to take the time, if possible, to learn what the reporter covers - so many of the pitches I receive are irrelevant to me either because of the topic or the geography (a college graduation in Vermont? Yeah, uh, I'm not covering). “ Michael Vasquez, The Miami Herald

     What should those who pitch you always do and never do?

    Give me the courtesy of figuring out if I am the person who would be most likely to write about your pitch, or at least preface it by saying “If this isn’t you, who would it be?” Don’t be over-familiar, but also don’t robot me to death with an obvious chain letter that you’re pretending is personal. And don’t presume coverage, like “We’re gonna need a story.” Well, you need to take out an ad then. Do readers need to read your story? That’s the most important thing to me. And please spell my name right. One more thing – don’t make me chase you down about the date of your event/TV episode premiere. If I have to do the research, that annoys me. I get about 150 unsolicited emails a day. I can’t read them all top to bottom before deciding what to do with them.” Leslie Gray Streeter, The Palm Beach Post

    “First, let me say that I’ve dealt with some absolutely fantastic PR people over the years. But I’ve dealt with some duds.

    As for always do—be nice. Seriously. You would think that this is something I wouldn’t have to say, but I have had PR people yell at me or be downright rude. I don’t understand it, but it sometimes happens. If someone says that he/she can help me with a story, then follow through. I’ve also had PR people fall off the face of the earth after I’ve gotten a story assignment—sometimes one that they’ve pitched to me. I know that life happens, so if something comes up, just tell me.

    Never do—don’t lie to me. If you think your client was great for a story and then you realize he/she isn’t, be upfront with me. I have a lot of respect for people who tell me the truth than try to make their clients fit when they really don’t. In fact, I’m more apt to work with that PR person again. And if I say that a story isn’t right for me, please don’t try to convince me otherwise. Doing this--it reminds me of people who yell at folks who don’t speak English because they think that this will somehow make them understand. I know if a story is right for me or not or if I think I can pitch it to a publication.

    Don’t call me unless we’ve had an email exchange first. Some days are crazy, and I’m doing back-to-back interviews for different publications, and unexpected calls can really throw me off. It’s better if we set up a time for talking by phone if that’s necessary.” Michele Wojciechowski, Freelance Writer

    “Don’t include me in your bulk email pitch blasts, unless it’s a topic you genuinely believe I’d be interested in. And if I place a query – urgent or otherwise – on Profnet, don’t respond unless you have an expert source who can address my specific question(s). Again, a huge pet peeve is when I get responses unrelated to my query. I placed a query once for something pet related – I think it was dog behavioral experts. And I couldn’t believe how many responses I had to sift through from PR folks promoting dog collars and dog bones and dog beds for sale. None of which had anything to do with my query about behavior.” James Burnett III, The Boston Globe

    “Don’t argue with someone who says no. Reporters and editors know what their bosses are looking for in a story. If you argue, you’re wasting your time and costing yourself goodwill.

    Don’t pitch a company that doesn’t fit a reporter’s request or query and hope that you’ll get the reporter to write something different. Example: If a reporter is asking for help in finding a company that has had trouble getting a loan, don’t pitch a financial adviser who can give tips about getting loans.

    Always ask, is this a good time? Even if it’s not, the question shows that you know how to work with a reporter or editor. They may even stop what they’re doing and talk with you then, simply because you’ve created some instant goodwill by being sensitive and savvy about their pressures.” Joyce Rosenberg, Associated Press

    What's the best way for someone in PR to start a working relationship with you?

    PR and media -- online, print, whatever -- must work more as a team. The PR people I work best with are the ones who will lend a hand to me and that is how the relationship usually starts. When I ask a question, for instance, and the answer isn’t one that is available, say so. Don’t just ignore it. The honesty, along with the help, can start a great relationship.” Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times

    “Be real. If you aren’t sure what kind of stories I’m into, ask me. Or, better yet, ask me to coffee. Also, honor deadlines.” Julie Wernau , The Chicago Tribune

    “There's no scientific way to develop a "relationship" with me. If that's appropriate and in the cards, it will happen organically. That is, if I deal with you repeatedly and consistently, we'll get to know each other. This can happen by a variety of means. I communicate with my local Verizon PR rep, Karen Smith, almost exclusively via Twitter DM. With Marie Domingo, a crack Silicon Valley PR pro, it is almost always via Google Chat within Gmail. It's a fun time because there are so many ways to interact with PR people.” Julio Ojeda-Zapata, St. Paul Pioneer Press

    “I have had great relationships with PR groups throughout my career. Regular contact is great. A PR person who takes the time to understand the stories we do regularly won’t have to blanket us with every release they write. They’ll know what we need. Plus, it’s always helpful when the PR group can easily connect you with a source. Sometimes we’re under deadline or have limited time to get something done. Radio is different. We don’t need an hour interview like print or TV. Very often what we need is the release and a 5 minute interview to get some great sound to use. The best people I’ve worked with have understood all of these things.” Cheryl Simone-Miller, 99.1 WNEW (CBS Radio)

    Do you have advice for members who respond to ProfNet queries? 

    Please don’t linger: I’m usually on a tight deadline and so expediency is best. The deadline in the query is the actual deadline. Also, don’t pitch experts that obviously have nothing to do with the query, or who may provide insight that is tangential at best.” Mark Guarino, The Christian Science Monitor

    “I love, love, love ProfNet because I almost always get what I am looking for, along with a few extraneous responses that I applaud for them just trying, you know? I like when the responses actually pertain to my question, and aren’t just blatant attempts to tie my story to the very specific people the PR professionals represent that obviously have nothing to do with what I’m looking for.” Leslie Gray Streeter, The Palm Beach Post

    “I understand that sometimes there is wiggle room in the way a query is written, but there are times when the response to the request is way out in left field. If, for instance, I ask for an expert on tipping etiquette, I am not interested in the latest tipping calculator. That’s not the question.

    The other thing is this: If you say that an expert can be available to me -- and that’s great and exciting -- don’t then come back and say that no, in fact, he or she is out of pocket for the rest of the week and can I do the interview middle of next week? Making sure that someone is available before the deadline is very helpful.”Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times

    “I find it best that responders to my ProfNet requests do so via email, and with the email provide the proposed source’s name, title, affiliation, credentials and phone/email contacts. If your proposed source is up to snuff, I then can follow-up at my leisure.” Darryl E. Owens, The Orlando Sentinel


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