Evelyn Tipacti

Loading...
    • Member Type(s): Content Publisher
      Expert
      Communications Professional
      Media - Freelancer
      Media - Broadcast
      Media - Print Journalist
      Media - Student Journalist
      Media - Web-only/Blogger
      Media - Other
      Other
    • Title:Community Editor
    • Organization:ProfNet Connect (PR Newswire)
    • Area of Expertise:Media Relations, Hispanic Media
    •  

    To become a ProfNet premium member and receive requests from reporters looking for expert sources, click here.

    Media 411: Bouncing Back After a Layoff

    Thursday, June 25, 2015, 3:21 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    These days working journalists all likely have a fear that’s nestled in the back of their heads along with a thousand other things – the fear of losing their job.

    Although not limited to journalists, it’s definitely something those who work in media have on their minds from time to time. It’s taken hostage those days of feeling safe and comfortable anywhere. But that’s just the way it is.

    Have you ever been laid off? It’s a humbling experience. However, you CAN bounce back from the experience. 

    Kristen Hare has a wonderful article up on Poynter called “Advice for journalists who’ve lost their jobs from journalists who’ve lost their jobs” which is worth your time, regardless of whether or not you currently have a job.

    Here are some of her suggestions:

    You gotta grieve

    Mathew Ingram was among the staff who had to find a new job earlier this year when the tech blog GigaOm closed down. Ingram is now a senior writer at Fortune. His advice for people facing a shut down really depends more on the person, he said in a phone interview, and where they are in their career. Some staff at GigaOm had to get a job right away, they didn’t have money saved up or a working spouse, so they couldn’t afford to take time and look.

    “So for them, just taking whatever came along was probably good advice, although that’s not what I would normally tell someone to do,” he said. “Obviously the best advice is to start thinking about that before your company goes under.”

    Most people who go to startups do so because they care about the work and the place, he said, and so it can be hard to have a plan B. But you should. Keep in touch with people. Be aware of what else is out there. It can be hard to be pumped up and committed to your job and also be aware that it might not work out, he said.

    “It’s like being super in love but also wanting a prenuptial contract,” Ingram said. “At the end of the day, you have to do what you have to do. Thinking about the worst-case scenario is something that you should theoretically be doing.”

    There’s also a grieving process that you have to go through, he said, “just like someone dying. It’s hard to short circuit that.”

    Many journalists, wherever they work, are emotionally committed to their jobs.

    “You join these things because you’re committed to them as an idea, not just oh, hey, this would be a cool paycheck and maybe I’ll get some equity out of it,” Ingram said. “It is a lot more like a relationship than a job.”

    Don’t just send off your application

    “First is to make sure your tribe knows your outlet has shut down and that you’re looking for work,” said Meena Thiruvengadam, now an editor at Yahoo Finance, via Twitter. Thiruvengadam was among the journalists to lose her job when Digital First Media’s Project Thunderdome shut down…

    To read the complete Poynter article, please click here.

    Other articles that offer good advice:

    Laid Off? 10 Tips For Suddenly Unemployed Journalists (Recovering Journalist)

    After the Newspaper Layoff: The First Six Things You Should Do (Black Star Rising)

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents to find an expert you can quote on virtually any topic. The best part? It’s free! Start your search now: Send a query

    Journalist Spotlight: Melissa Sachs, Senior Legal Writer, Westlaw Journal Computer & Internet (Thomson Reuters)

    Friday, June 19, 2015, 1:07 PM [Spotlight]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Welcome to our SPOTLIGHT feature, where we highlight a journalist and ProfNet user to share their personal story and insight with you.

    This SPOTLIGHT belongs to Melissa Sachsan attorney, who writes about computer, Internet, privacy and social media issues for Westlaw Journal Computer & Internet (Thomson Reuters).

    Her favorite day of the week is Friday because she can bring Bella, her American Pit Bull Terrier, to the office

    We hope you find Melissa's SPOTLIGHT both enjoyable and informative.

    Can you tell us about your first job as a professional journalist?

    This is my first job as a professional journalist.  My office is a great place to learn.  About half of the people went to school for journalism or worked at daily newspapers.  The rest of us have law degrees.  All of us are writers and editors, depending on the day of the week.

    What type of stories do you prefer to cover the most?

    I write the Westlaw Journal Computer & Internet and some stories for the Westlaw Journal Aviation.  I also wrote the Westlaw Journal Insurance Coverage.  I know I do not like writing about plane crashes or boat accidents, but some insurance stories are much more interesting than people may initially think!  Interesting topics that I’ve covered recently are lawsuits involving students or city employees posting on Facebook; searches and seizures of electronic devices at the U.S. border; and, government surveillance.  About a month ago, I wrote a story that got picked up by other news outlets — Parents lost daughter to mass shooter, now owe $220,000 to his suppliers — including by a legal journalist for Reuters who I really admire.  That was very exciting! 

    Do you make suggestions regarding the stories you cover or are they assigned to you?

    I pick the stories that I cover.  Sometimes my co-workers will forward me suggestions if they see something in the news that has to do with computer or Internet litigation.

    Is there a best part to being a journalist and having your specific role?

    Oh, this question is a little unfair because I feel so extremely lucky to have my job and work in my office.  I love the fact that I get to keep up with trends in the law, especially trends involving social media or working remotely or, even, the sharing economy.  My subject matter is very broad – it covers how social media evidence can be used in a courtroom, “Twibel” (Twitter libel) or other defamation suits, hacking and who can sue whom when there is a data breach. 

    What advice to do you have for those in PR or anyone else who may want to pitch you a story idea?

    Send them over!  Our office publishes stories about litigation and legal news.  If the pitch doesn’t work for my journal, it may work for another one of our 30+ journals that we print through our office.  Here is a list of the topics we cover.  Generally, we accept commentaries that run from 1,500-2,200 words that are aimed at legal practitioners and C-suite executives. 

    Also, please be patient, but feel free to politely follow-up.  Like most others in my office, I wear a few hats.  Sometimes I’m an editor, but I also have weekly and daily writing deadlines.  My inbox can get a bit overwhelming so there may be a chance that I’ll miss an email that got sent while I was hunkered down and writing.    

    What should they always do and never do?

    Always feel free to run an idea by me whether it’s in response to a specific query or something they think may work with one of our publications.  But, remember, our journals are aimed at legal practitioners and business executives. 

    How can someone in PR get to know you and develop that important connection to build trust?

    I’m happy to speak to PR people over the phone or meet in person, if that’s feasible.  I’m also happy to connect with someone on LinkedIn or Twitter.  Most PR people who are on my go-to list are people who I’ve only corresponded with over email.  Maybe eventually we’ll start following each other on Twitter, which helps because I can direct message them urgent requests. 

    I guess the best way to develop that connection is to be easy to work with.  Pulling the pieces together for an article can be tedious – getting pictures, signing agreements, planning for deadlines, sending editorial feedback, etc.  Making it a pleasurable experience definitely goes a long way.

    Do you have advice for members who respond to ProfNet queries?

    Feel free to email quickly and see if it is worthwhile to send a longer follow-up.  Sometimes I am sent generic pitches that simply don’t match the request or wouldn’t be appropriate for our audience. 

    Also, it’s helpful if they read the query fully.

    What type of experts do you like to work with?

    Usually the best experts for my articles are practicing attorneys or legal scholars.

    How do use social media at work?

    We share a few of our journal articles on two blogs published by Thomson Reuters (Knowledge Effect and Legal Solutions) and we’ll ask the teams behind the @Westlaw or @ThomsonReuters Twitter/Facebook/LinkedIn accounts to share them.  I also will share articles via my personal Twitter account, LinkedIn and Facebook.  Internally, we use an instant messaging program and a Web-based intranet.

    Can you tell us about your favorite or most challenging assignment?

    I don’t really have a favorite assignment although the online gun sales story I mentioned above was a pretty cool experience because it got a lot of views and comments.  Maybe my favorite assignments have to do with cases that are underreported in the mainstream press, but that have significant legal implications.  A lot of social media cases fall into this category – e.g., a Missouri man was charged with making terroristic threats when he tweeted about a pressure cooker and the Boston Marathon during the 2013 World Series between the Cardinals and the Red Sox, but a Missouri appeals court affirmed the dismissal of the case.  A case between Google and Oracle that I wrote about in October is gaining more mainstream press coverage now and may have a lot of implications for fair use of computer code.

    The most challenging part of my work is following big class-actions that may have really quick movement in the legal system.  My journal prints every two weeks although we post stories online (behind a paywall) on a continuous basis.  For the Target data breach story that I wrote, it was hard to make sure that the information on the print deadline would be the most up-to-date because folks were filing lawsuits almost daily for a bit. 

    If someone starting their journalism career is reading this, what advice would you offer them?

    Write as much as you can and read as much as you can.  Start a blog for your writing on a topic that interests you.  Try to keep to a steady posting schedule.  Don’t be afraid of social media and connecting with people who you admire in the field.

    Finally, please tell us about Bella, your adorable dog.

    Bella is the best.  She is eight-years old.  She was my brother’s dog and was raised in a fraternity house at Penn State.  He moved to apartments in Philadelphia and New York where pit bulls were not allowed and now she lives at my parents’ house, which is close to my office.  She’s super-friendly despite her appearance!  She loves getting baths (except for tomato soup baths after she was sprayed by a skunk!) and going “bye-bye” in the car.


    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents to find an expert you can quote on virtually any topic. The best part? It’s free! Start your search now: Send a query

    Media 411: Amusing Media Memes

    Thursday, June 18, 2015, 1:00 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)


    Memes are part of everyday life, making us laugh at ourselves and better yet, at everyone else. They make fun of almost everything and everyone and not surprisingly, the news business is usually a target.

    This week I searched for some funny memes about the industry and have included the best ones which were suitable to share. Enjoy!

    Whether you're just starting out or are an experienced writer, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents to find an expert you can quote on virtually any topic. The best part? It’s free! Start your search now: Send a query

    Media 411: Advice for Journalism Interns

    Thursday, June 11, 2015, 3:15 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)


    If you’re one of the lucky students who got an internship this summer (or at any other time of the year), read up on how  to do your best, make a good impression and not mess up the opportunity given to you.

    Internships don't just help you get that "foot in the door," they teach you about the industry, the ins and outs of that particular outlet, and how real journalists work. 

    Always be aware that the chance was given to you, realize it's alright and expected to know little and take this time to learn as much as you can. 

    Hopefully the tips in these articles will help give you confidence and help you as you get started on your way up the journalism ladder.

    Whether you're just starting out or are an experienced writer, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents to find an expert you can quote on virtually any topic. The best part? It’s free! Start your search now: Send a query

    Media 411: Ways to Improve Photojournalism Skills

    Thursday, June 4, 2015, 2:40 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    The click of a camera’s button can create an entire story, a story that needn’t a single word.

    Or perhaps an image can accompany an article, that same image equal to the words written, not more or less important than the story. Think of the biggest stories and world events in your lifetime and imagine them without an image or video. Not the same, right?

    Photographs from the past are what transport us to an actual location. We have seen the devastation of world wars, famine, drought, natural disasters. Of course those stories would still be surreal, but those images help us understand the fear, the horror or the beauty of what is being told. Images from the 19th and early 20th centuries are captivating because we can see into an era that ceased to exist a very long time ago.

    Photojournalists are an integral part of a newsroom and their role is crucial for an audience regardless of medium or whether it’s a photograph or video.

    Here's a link to a piece about New York photojournalist Ricky Flores about his experiences in the early 1980's covering a very rough time in the city's history. 

    If you’re a photojournalist or if you’re just starting, the articles below will help you get new ideas to make what you already do even better. 

    What are your personal suggestions?


    Whether you're just starting out or are an experienced writer, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents to find an expert you can quote on virtually any topic. The best part? It’s free! Start your search now: Send a query

    Media 411: An Innovative Online College Publication

    Thursday, May 28, 2015, 3:39 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)


    College and university publications often have some of the most clever and creative reporting around with more liberty to experiment with formats and content than their “professional” counterparts.

    That very combination of freedom and the use of technology has yielded one of the most unique online publications for a California college which has folded its print publication and has started a new editorial process that has proven to work.

    Mt. San Antonio College has its own story to tell and here, as written by Dan Reimold of the Nieman Lab, is the story of their success:

    The Mountaineer student newspaper at California’s Mt. San Antonio College no longer exists. About two months ago, the paper dropped its print edition, abandoned its website, ditched its longtime news production process, expanded its coverage base, and rejiggered its entire reporting philosophy. It also changed its name to SAC.Media.

    The result of all this reinvention: A small editorial team at a two-year school in the Los Angeles suburbs is running one of the most daring, innovative college media outlets in the United States.

    SAC.Media is one of the only student news operations hosted exclusively onMedium, the digital publishing network emerging as the next buzzworthy blogosphere. Staffers are laser-focused on hyperlocal and realtime reporting as the cornerstones of their coverage. They publish organically, without artificial deadlines — based on nothing other than when news breaks or stories are done. And they are determined to engage Mt. SAC (as the school is known) students and area residents in not just reading but responding — adopting a news-as-conversation model and showing that “student issues” are no longer confined to campus.

    For their efforts, at a recent journalism conference, a longtime student media adviser described the SAC.Media staff as nothing less than “rock stars of journalism.”

    Mt. SAC journalism professor and SAC.Media faculty adviser Toni Albertson worked for music magazines in the 1980s. She summoned a rock star relevant in that era to describe the larger byproduct of all this transformation.

    “For a long time, with the print paper, we just had to go with ‘Here’s what happened this past week or past month on campus,'” she said. “Now it’s like the doors are open. The wind’s blowing in. It’s like a Stevie Nicks video — the wind in the hair. The students are all excited. And I’m happy to come to work. Not that I wasn’t happy before. But I come to work with a whole new attitude, because I wonder, ‘What are they going to do today?’ This has turned this entire place into an experimental lab.”

    One major part of the experiment has been...

    To continue reading, please click here.

    Whether you're just starting out or are an experienced writer, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents to find an expert you can quote on virtually any topic. The best part? It’s free! Start your search now: Send a query

     

    PR Advice from the Media: Your Questions Answered

    Friday, May 22, 2015, 10:08 AM [Spotlight]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Our monthly Spotlight series focuses on journalists and opens the door into their lives as members of the media in their respective newsrooms.

    Since the year began, we’ve gotten some great advice regarding how to best pitch them so we’ve decided to do a midyear roundup of the best responses we’ve received to the questions we’ve asked in 2015.

    The journalists featured are:

    • George Putic, Science and technology Reporter, Voice of America

    What advice do you have for PR professionals who want to pitch you?

    Think about why your story would interest the general public. Are you sending out a release because it’s your job or because you really have a story to tell? Some press releases that come across my desk would only be of interest to a specialist niche.  Repeated emails from the same company that are of no interest eventually get spam filtered or deleted without reading. (Chris O’ Donnell)

    If you want to pitch a story idea, you should make sure that I’m in charge of writing about that particular subject. (Kasia Fejklowicz)

    Give me stuff that moves the science and technology forward and looks visually interesting. (George Putic)

    If someone’s pitching you, what should they always do and never do?

    If it’s got a local tie, tell us that in the subject line of your email (we love local). Creative ideas that spin off of current events are always welcome. Do some quick research on the writer before sending your pitch. Resist putting the “urgent” status on email. Keep the initial message short and on-topic (bullet points highlighting the details are extraordinary)…Please, please, please do not sign your email XOXO. (I see this more often than you would imagine). (Kristi Gustafson Barlette)

    They should always read their pitch and check for grammar mistakes…They shouldn’t call me unless we’ve arranged an interview. (Kasia Fejklowicz)

    Never pitch as if you’re trying to sell a product…Keep in mind that VOA’s audience is very international and that something interesting for the US audience may be less interesting for viewers in Africa or South-East Asia. (George Putic)

    Keep a press release short and to the point. Remember we’re in the news game so put what is new or important in the title or high up in the release. Editors go gaga over nutgrafs that include the words “biggest,” “first,” “fastest,” “only,” so figure out what is unique or different about your company, product or event and tell me that. (Chris O’Donnell)

    How can someone reach out to you to start a good working relationship?

    Someone in PR can get to know me and develop a relationship by reaching out to me via email. Letting me know what types of experts they can put me in touch with is also very helpful. (Kasia Fejklowicz)

    A phone call is usually best as I receive hundreds of emails every day. But do some research in advance. I’m a city hall reporter so don’t make me feel bad by having to tell you I have no interest whatsoever in your virtual education conference. (Chris O’Donnell)

    Social media connections are invaluable. Follow writers and editors on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Connect with them on LinkedIn. Establish a professional relationship outside of the pitch. That way, when you do propose a topic, your name/company is familiar. (Kristi Gustafson Barlette)

    Do you have advice for members who respond to ProfNet queries?

    I know it’s hard but please try not to use jargon in interviews. If I’ve done my research, I can usually keep up but I’m also looking for quotes I can use in my story.  The best sources are those who can talk in lay terms. Avoid pseudo talk and terms like “synergistic.” Please. (Chris O’Donnell)

    Offer a sentence, or three, giving the reporter an idea of your client’s position on the topic. Just saying so-and-so is a psychologist with 20 years experience doesn’t show much. But, if you say all that and add a short paragraph outlining where the expert stands on the subject the reporter is covering, the writer can better decide if the expert may be a good fit. (Kristi Gustafson Barlette)

    Members who reach out to me should provide me with their background information, and why they are experts in that particular field. (Kasia Fejklowicz)

    If you can, invest in a good web camera and find a place with a nice backdrop where you can sit at your laptop. As many of the interviews are done via Skype you’d want to look good on screen. (George Putic)

    What type of experts do you prefer to work with?

    I prefer to work with experts who are patient and who can explain complex topics in layman’s terms. (Kasia Fejklowicz)

    Not too verbose. TV is a fast-paced medium so two-minute answers to questions create a lot of headache for reporters. (George Putic)

    University professors tend to be good sources. They typically have a genuine interest in the subject and are honest when asked a question they are capable of answering.  Consultants or authors can be excellent sources but sometimes give the impression they just want to get their company name out there. (Chris O’Donnell)

    I’ve yet to find any group of experts off-putting. It’s less about the type of expert, and more about the person. Some experts approach their pitches better than others (ex: reaching out when you aren’t well versed on the topic doesn’t really benefit you, or the writer). (Kristi Gustafson Barlette)

    Do you use social media at work?

    Facebook and Twitter are now inextricably woven into my day. Elected officials, like anyone else, can’t help but tell the world about their doings and all kinds of news ensues. (Chris O’Donnell)

    Social media is excellent for crowdsourcing, understanding what interests readers most and even finding expert sources or story ideas. (Kristi Gustafson Barlette)

    Whether you're just starting out or are an experienced writer, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents to find an expert you can quote on virtually any topic. The best part? It’s free! Start your search now: Send a query

    Media 411: How to Connect with ProfNet Experts As a Non-Traditional Journalist

    Thursday, May 21, 2015, 3:17 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    ProfNet has been connecting journalists with expert sources since 1992, but did you know ProfNet is not limited to mainstream media? Whether you write for a blog, company website or newsletter or are a freelancer, book author or content marketer, ProfNet can be a valuable tool.

    PR Newswire Media How-To focuses on making the most of PR Newswire for Journalists’ tools for freelancers. Catch up on previous how-tos and try our free media tools for yourself by signing up at prnmedia.prnewswire.com.

    In today’s fast-paced, social media-connected, content-driven world, traditional journalists aren’t the only ones writing for various platforms. Bloggers, authors, content marketers, internal communications pros and other non-traditional journalists are also tasked with providing compelling and engaging content to their audiences. And they often find themselves facing the same challenges identifying credible and reliable sources as a print or broadcast journalist.

    Traditional news reporters and editors frequently use ProfNet’s query service to help them find experts for their stories. ProfNet receives approximately 80-100 queries daily, which it then sends out to corporations, small businesses, non-profits, universities and other organizations in search of subject matter experts who will fit the needs of the reporter making the submission.

    However, contrary to what you might think, ProfNet is not limited to mainstream media. Whether you write for a blog, company website or newsletter or are a freelancer, book author or content marketer, ProfNet can be a valuable tool.

    Bloggers: If you have a blog, ProfNet can connect you with sources so you can write informative and fun entries. From food to kids, we’ve got you covered.

    Corporate writers: Traditional writers are not the only ones who can submit queries. If you write for a company’s website and need expert sources, ProfNet is here to find them for you no matter the topic.

    Authors: For anyone writing a book, especially non-fiction, expert commentary may be necessary. You can...

    To continue reading, please click here.

    Whether you're just starting out or are an experienced writer, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents to find an expert you can quote on virtually any topic. The best part? It’s free! Start your search now: Send a query

    Media 411: Protecting Your Work Online

    Thursday, May 14, 2015, 2:57 PM [Media 411]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    In this era of hacking and online security breaches, journalists are trying to protect their content and sources more than ever.

    Chris Ip of The Columbia Journalism Review wrote an article with suggestions for protecting one’s work. If you haven’t already seen it, I highly recommend reading it below. It's worth your time.

    **************************************************************

    DIGITAL SECURITY POST-SNOWDEN has become a staple of the reporter’s toolkit. If you want extra layers of protection for your work but aren’t sure where to begin, your first move as a Gmail user should probably be with the service’s two-step verification. CJR also spoke with several cybersecurity experts to put together an essential set of tools for journalists, starting with the simplest and ending with the safest. All of them are open source or included with most operating systems.

    1. Secure your hard drive
    Mac: Filevault
    Windows: Bitlocker

    Both of these tools encrypt your entire hard drive, making data impossible to access if your computer is stolen. And both are included free with many versions of your operating system.

    2. Send safer email
    Enigmail with email client Thunderbird

    Using PGP (“Pretty Good Privacy”) encryption, these tools ensure that only your email recipient will be able to read your message. Anyone who intercepts the message will just see a string of nonsensical characters. Cameran Ashraf, a digital safety trainer for Global Journalist Security, calls it “about as good as it gets for secured electronic communications.”

    3. Make it easy for sources to chat…
    Cryptocat

    CJR heard Cryptocat called “the gateway drug of encryption” when we first covered it in 2013, for its easy-to-use, intuitive interface. It’s a…

    To continue reading, please click here.

    Whether you're just starting out or are an experienced writer, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents to find an expert you can quote on virtually any topic. The best part? It’s free! Start your search now: Send a query

    A Day in the Life of a Freelance Writer

    Wednesday, May 13, 2015, 3:13 PM [#ConnectChat]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    On Tuesday, May 12, we hosted our latest #ConnectChat, "A Day in the Life of a Freelance Writer," with Dawn Papandrea (@DawnPapandrea), a full-time freelance writer specializing in personal finance, higher education, and family topics.

    Papandrea, who often uses ProfNet to help her find sources, gave us a rundown of what her workday is like, the importance of not being distracted, taking time off, mistakes to avoid and much more.

    If you're a journalist, blogger or content marketer in need of expert sources (or "real people") for your articles, try sending a ProfNet query -- it's easy and free.

    Dawn, can you please tell us about yourself and about your work as a full-time freelancer?

    I've been a full-time freelancer for about a year. I work mostly w/ online pubs and brand content. I started out as an editor about 15 years ago, and began freelancing on the side about 6 years ago.

    What’s the first work-related activity you do to start your day as a writer?

    I list out my deadlines, phone call appointments, follow ups I have to do, and from there, I prioritize my to-do list. Each day varies, but the bulk of my writing gets done early in the morning. From there, I do calls, marketing, etc.

    How do you balance the several assignments you have to finish, especially if you just write in the morning?

    I try to stay a day or two ahead on everything so that I have wiggle room if life gets in the way, or a source falls through. It's funny that I'm a "morning writer" now, but I find that it's when I can pound out those word counts. But, of course, on those multiple deadline days, I'm sometimes writing in the wee hours, too.

    What do you do when a source falls through?

    First off, I always try to have a backup on hand just in case. ProfNet helps with that. But for those last-minute source flake outs, I may resort to begging my friends for help and social media helps, too!

    What type of editorial calendar do you use, and how do you decide how many assignments to take on for the week?

    I use old school pen/paper for my calendar. I try to figure out how long assignments will take, and go from there.

    Do you ever have deadlines for the same day?

    Yes, deadlines do seem to travel in packs. Luckily, the bulk of the work is done before I actually sit down to write.

    Do you find it hard to take vacations as a full-time freelance writer?

    I joke around saying I'm the toughest boss I've ever had. But I do make time for vacations and mental health days.

    Where do writers find brand content work?

    We're in a time when brands are their own publishers, with editorials staffs and everything. For those interested in brand content, check out @customcouncil. One last brand content resource for writers: www.jennifergregorywriter.com/articles/&...

    Do you work every day?

    I do at least some work every day, but I *really* work 4-5 days per week. Meaning, I might have to do a quick phoner or write up a blog post over the weekend, but I try not to work Fri-Sun.

    What are your favorite and least favorite parts of your job?

    Fav parts of the job: Flexibility, being my own boss, writing about things that interest me, etc. Least fav part: The constant hustle. Even at your busiest, you should be looking for more work to sustain your business.

    I have to ask – have you ever forgotten an assignment or mixed up a deadline?

    I’m a stickler for deadlines, but I’ve been guilty of marking the wrong date on my calendar once or twice. It happens.

    Where's your most productive place to write? (Some don't like writing at home, because they get too comfortable.)

    I do 95% of my work at the desk in my kitchen. It's where I'm most productive. But I do like getting out. 

    How long did it take for you to be able to establish yourself as a full-time freelance writer?

    I freelanced on the side for about 5 years before going full-time, so I had a good base to help me ramp up. I don't think it needs to take that long, but getting steady work before you take the plunge will make the transition easier.

    What are the most common mistakes freelancers make, especially those just starting out?

    Common mistake: Not reaching for the stars. Start out with smaller pubs, but keep trying. One great clip can open doors. Also, not picking your battles carefully, and complaining about editors on social media. They will find out!

    How can someone with little experience start getting assignments? What do they do first?

    Starting out, you have to stand out with a great pitch. Editors are desperate for fresh ideas, packaged in a unique way. To improve your odds, study the publication and tailor the idea for it specifically. So many writers don't do that.

    How do you develop your relationships with editors?

    First and foremost, by doing consistent good work, plain and simple. Make your editors' jobs easier, and they'll love you. Also, if there’s a chance to connect with editors in person or even on the phone, that goes a long way, too.

    In your experience, should you ever call an editor or is email really the best way to start communicating? Social media?

    Getting on the phone is appropriate to talk through a complex assignment. But for pitching, making intros, email all the way. I do like social media as well (esp. Twitter/LinkedIn), but be smart about it. Editors don't want to feel stalked.

    How does a new freelancer ensure they’re getting paid appropriately? Is there somewhere to go to check for info like this?

    I think you have to work for rates that are right for you. Some might say not to take less than $X, but it's all subjective. That's not to say you should give your work away, but if something translates into a good hourly rate, go for it.

    How do you deal with distractions?

    I truly make a conscious effort to avoid distractions. Being disciplined is key for succeeding at this.

    How do you handle working with a child or little ones in the house who aren't old enough for school or aren't in day care?

    That's tough. I did it up until my youngest started kindergarten this year. I worked during naps, late at night, etc. If it's truly your business, though, it's important to get help (or pay for help) so you can be productive. Confession: I still do conference calls in my bedroom with the door closed when the kids are home. Boys are noisy!

    What should all writers, both new freelancers and those in the biz for a long time be doing every single day?

    Marketing. You have to sell yourself every day. Whether it's pitching, blogging, connecting via social, you have to market.

    For more freelance writing tips, pls. check out my recent post: linkd.in/1KJLVwI 

    Whether you're just starting out or are an experienced writer, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. Send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents to find an expert you can quote on virtually any topic. The best part? It’s free! Start your search now: Send a query


    Page 1 of 46  •  1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 46 Next