Evelyn Tipacti's blog listings. Feed Zend_Feed_Writer 1.10.8 (http://framework.zend.com) http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti Media 411: 10 Songs About Journalism There are so many great movies about the world of media and journalism so a while back I decided to write a blog post about movies that focused on the world of those who work in newsrooms. 

Some were comedies, some were dramas and some were romantic comedies. Why not do a blog post about music?

Songs were a bit tougher to find, but here is a list of ten songs with some sort of reference to the news business. Can you think of any others?

Dirty Laundry

Don Henley

Yesterday’s Papers

The Rolling Stones

Sunday Papers

Joe Jackson

Black Diamond Bay

Bob Dylan

Six O’Clock News

Kathleen Edwards

Reuters

Wire

The Morning Paper

Smog

Headline Hustler

10cc

Evening News

Chamillionaire

What's in the Headline?

Don Covay

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

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Thu, 25 Sep 2014 15:22:41 -0500 http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2014/09/25/media_411:_10_songs_about_journalism http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2014/09/25/media_411:_10_songs_about_journalism There are so many great movies about the world of media and journalism so a while back I decided to write a blog post about movies that focused on the world of those who work in newsrooms. 

Some were comedies, some were dramas and some were romantic comedies. Why not do a blog post about music?

Songs were a bit tougher to find, but here is a list of ten songs with some sort of reference to the news business. Can you think of any others?

Dirty Laundry

Don Henley

Yesterday’s Papers

The Rolling Stones

Sunday Papers

Joe Jackson

Black Diamond Bay

Bob Dylan

Six O’Clock News

Kathleen Edwards

Reuters

Wire

The Morning Paper

Smog

Headline Hustler

10cc

Evening News

Chamillionaire

What's in the Headline?

Don Covay

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

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Media 411: Encouraging Journalists with Newsroom Sounds

Being a journalist is not easy.  It is hard work and requires a lot of effort. Preparing a story takes time and requires a lot of research.  Over time it can become tedious, repetitive and may take some encouragement and cheering from colleagues, family and friends to stay motivated. Hours are crazy, stress is high – a mood booster really is sometimes necessary.

What do you to feel good and to get motivated? Perhaps you work out or maybe you listen to music. One newsroom in London has a very unique way of pumping of their staff. Last month I read an article and was surprised to discover that The Times of London was playing typewriter sounds into their newsroom to increase their energy. Can you imagine walking into your newsroom and all of a sudden hear these sounds? Would you feel motivated? I don’t know if I would be but I loved the sound of a typewriter as a kid. Tap, tap, tap, tap, tap, tap, ping!

If you’re among the younger generation, you probably never used a typewriter. If you’re in your forties or older you will likely recall the days of typing your stories or your high school book reports and college essays on one. I sure do. I had both the “old-fashioned” one which got my hands stained with ink and an electric one from Canon.  I remember thinking it was a savior. No more ink, no more trouble fixing mistakes. It had a tiny screen so I could see what I was typing, then I’d hit enter and it would print. I loved it. Of course now it may have well been an inkwell and feather pen.

I give Rupert Murdoch credit for trying to get the best out of his staff. That’s a good thing, right? But, if you never heard the sound of a typewriter would it be encouraging or just annoying? It would be nostalgic for me, but I do think it would slowly drive me mad, the same way department store employees are subjected to the same loop of ten songs all day long, day in and day out. Ay! 

What’s your take on this? Is it a good idea or would you at some point throw your computer at the speaker system? I’d really like to know.

Images courtesty of bing.

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

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Thu, 18 Sep 2014 14:42:49 -0500 http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2014/09/18/media_411:_encouraging_journalists_with_newsroom_sounds http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2014/09/18/media_411:_encouraging_journalists_with_newsroom_sounds

Being a journalist is not easy.  It is hard work and requires a lot of effort. Preparing a story takes time and requires a lot of research.  Over time it can become tedious, repetitive and may take some encouragement and cheering from colleagues, family and friends to stay motivated. Hours are crazy, stress is high – a mood booster really is sometimes necessary.

What do you to feel good and to get motivated? Perhaps you work out or maybe you listen to music. One newsroom in London has a very unique way of pumping of their staff. Last month I read an article and was surprised to discover that The Times of London was playing typewriter sounds into their newsroom to increase their energy. Can you imagine walking into your newsroom and all of a sudden hear these sounds? Would you feel motivated? I don’t know if I would be but I loved the sound of a typewriter as a kid. Tap, tap, tap, tap, tap, tap, ping!

If you’re among the younger generation, you probably never used a typewriter. If you’re in your forties or older you will likely recall the days of typing your stories or your high school book reports and college essays on one. I sure do. I had both the “old-fashioned” one which got my hands stained with ink and an electric one from Canon.  I remember thinking it was a savior. No more ink, no more trouble fixing mistakes. It had a tiny screen so I could see what I was typing, then I’d hit enter and it would print. I loved it. Of course now it may have well been an inkwell and feather pen.

I give Rupert Murdoch credit for trying to get the best out of his staff. That’s a good thing, right? But, if you never heard the sound of a typewriter would it be encouraging or just annoying? It would be nostalgic for me, but I do think it would slowly drive me mad, the same way department store employees are subjected to the same loop of ten songs all day long, day in and day out. Ay! 

What’s your take on this? Is it a good idea or would you at some point throw your computer at the speaker system? I’d really like to know.

Images courtesty of bing.

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

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Media 411: Fact-checking Getting your information correct is always important, no matter what industry you work in. If you’re a journalist, however, extra effort is necessary or you could get into a whole lot of trouble. You need to make sure the details in your report are accurate so as not to mislead your audience and it’s also your responsibility to ensure that what’s said by those you interview is correct.

If your name is attached to a report you’re held accountable for what you put out there, so it’s imperative to get the facts straight, do your research, and if your gut makes you question something, trust your instinct and check it out.

Here are some articles that will help guide you and teach you the art of fact-checking.

7 ways to make your work easy to fact check (Poynter)

A Journalist’s Guide to Fact Checking (Yahoo! Small Business Advisor)

Why fact-checking is the root of journalism: 8 good questions with PolitiFact’s Angie Drobnic Holan (American Press Institute)

What ‘Fact-Checking’ Means Online (The New York Times)

5 ‘essential understandings’ of the fact-checking movement (PolitiFact.com)

State of Journalism: The Lost Art of Fact Checking (Bethany McLean via LinkedIn)

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

Photo courtesy of bing.

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Thu, 11 Sep 2014 15:48:55 -0500 http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2014/09/11/media_411:_fact-checking http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2014/09/11/media_411:_fact-checking Getting your information correct is always important, no matter what industry you work in. If you’re a journalist, however, extra effort is necessary or you could get into a whole lot of trouble. You need to make sure the details in your report are accurate so as not to mislead your audience and it’s also your responsibility to ensure that what’s said by those you interview is correct.

If your name is attached to a report you’re held accountable for what you put out there, so it’s imperative to get the facts straight, do your research, and if your gut makes you question something, trust your instinct and check it out.

Here are some articles that will help guide you and teach you the art of fact-checking.

7 ways to make your work easy to fact check (Poynter)

A Journalist’s Guide to Fact Checking (Yahoo! Small Business Advisor)

Why fact-checking is the root of journalism: 8 good questions with PolitiFact’s Angie Drobnic Holan (American Press Institute)

What ‘Fact-Checking’ Means Online (The New York Times)

5 ‘essential understandings’ of the fact-checking movement (PolitiFact.com)

State of Journalism: The Lost Art of Fact Checking (Bethany McLean via LinkedIn)

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

Photo courtesy of bing.

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Building Your Expert Brand Through Books On Tuesday, Sept. 2, we hosted our latest #ConnectChat, "Building Your Expert Brand Through Books," with Ashley Jones, director of marketing and business development at Greenleaf Book Group.

Jones discussed the biggest mistakes beginners make, whether you need a lot of money to promote your brand, increasing visibility, and much more.

Please follow @ProfNet and @editorev on Twitter for more information on future chats or check back right here on ProfNet Connect for details.

Ashley, please tell us about Greenleaf Book Group and what your role is there.

Greenleaf is an exciting place. Our goal is to help people with big ideas grow into recognized thought leaders. We are a hybrid book publisher and we bring together the best aspects of traditional and self-publishing. Greenleaf authors have access to our strong distribution team keep creative control, IP and most of the royalties. We also help authors think beyond the book and leverage their ideas and content in new ways.

The book publishing industry is so competitive. How do you distinguish yourself and your books from everyone else?

Books are an important thought-leadership cornerstone. To stand out, authors need an online platform and audience building. Tactics like exclusive content for email lists, feedback from beta audiences, and videos to expand messages go a long way. An audience who supports the book when it launches is a huge advantage. They are like passionate partners.

What does branding and marketing mean for authors?

Authors engage in marketing all of the time. Book signings, social media, or paid advertising are good examples. While some authors recoil at “marketing,” it’s about helping people who are interested in the author’s expertise and relationship building. Branding is part of marketing. A brand is the meaning audiences attribute to a product, service, or individual.

Do you need a lot of money to effectively promote your brand?

There are lots of brand-building tactics that authors can engage in without spending a lot of money. Authors can leverage social media, attract audiences and use creative tactics to engage their audiences. Many tactics are free or inexpensive, if an author is willing to put the energy and time into them.

How can Greenleaf help an independent author build their brand?

For authors, building brands is about knowing the audience, creating a strong message, and sharing that message. Greenleaf works with independent authors to build the right kind of brand to attract a loyal audience. The tactics we recommend depend on the author, their message, and the audience they should be reaching.

For example, a fiction author would be likely to have a very different approach than a business author.

We focus on creating a strategy, building assets like a website, a presentation, and social media presence, and finding the audience.

What are some steps a new author can take to increase their visibility so media and others see them as experts in their fields?

Building an expert brand can be challenging. The most important step is to determine audience and message. Next, it's key to make yourself look like an expert with an online presence, public speaking, and media presence. Media attention can be garnered through sites like PR Newswire or direct outreach to the press. We also recommend working with PR agencies -- a good publicist can help to build media buzz, which is invaluable.

Would you consider blogging an effective way for someone to promote their book and expertise?

Blogging is a GREAT tool for all authors. It is a venue to share ideas with a wider audience. Blogging helps to build SEO value (so you can be found online), credibility, and connect with an audience. If treated correctly, your devoted blog audience will be the first people to read and promote your book.

What are the biggest mistakes beginners make when it comes to brand?

There are two big mistakes I see authors make when building their brands, and there are easy ways to avoid both: 1) Building brand elements (i.e., website, business cards) before getting clear on a message or plan; 2) Not sticking to a brand-building plan. It's easy to get distracted; make a plan and stick to it.

It's easy to see how authors make these mistakes. Building a brand is hard work and it’s easy to lose focus. To avoid these mistakes, authors should create and stick to a plan where each step connects to long-term goals. Having a branding professional on your team helps. We know what mistakes to watch out for, the best timing, and what to focus on.

Let's take a step back. How can someone develop enough content to write a book to start their journey as an expert and build their brand?

Most people who are considering a book are surprised to find that they already have content that they can use. I love blogging as a first step -- blogging is a great way to organize and share ideas and test them on an audience. Greenleaf also helps authors to evaluate their ideas and gives feedback on concepts submitted to us.

Do people who want to work with Greenleaf need to have some of their work already published before you consider them?

No, many Greenleaf authors are first-time authors. We are highly selective, but we love working with new authors.

Some people may think this is an overnight process, but how long can it take for a new author to become a trusted expert?

Brand building is often a long process. Ask anyone who is an overnight success. They'll tell you it took years. Experts can avoid wasting time by starting their brand on the right foot -- a clear message and strong online assets.

Speaking opportunities are a good way to get visibility. How can someone go about getting those opportunities or increasing them?

Authors who want to speak need a professional presentation and a great topic to speak on. Audiences want to hear about ideas, not about the book -- they want a topic that is exciting, not a sales pitch. With a good topic and presentation, reach out to your local @NSAspeakers chapter or speakers bureau for opportunities.

Do you recommend that an author partner with another more successful one?

Partnerships with other authors, businesses, or organizations are always beneficial for new authors. Those brands have audiences who may be excited about a new author's ideas -- access to their audience is great. It's key for new authors to think about what they can offer partners. Speaking or promotion are a few options.

What role does social media play? What should an author be doing to drive sales and visibility?

Social media is great for building interest and sharing ideas. Staying active and sharing relevant info is key.

It's key to give value to an audience, not be focused on self-promotion. People love authors who provide value. That's true everywhere, especially in social media. I want to follow someone who gives me great info. Don't you? Social is helpful in book sales, but it's not a direct link. Social media is about relationships, not sales. That said, authors with truly strong social media followings often see strong book sales.

Greenleaf Book Group has a conference coming up. What's it about?

Greenleaf's Summit is about helping authors build brands, books, and connect with each other. We'll go into details about the topics above, and others for new and experienced authors.

When and where is it and how can an author register?

The summit is in Austin, Texas, Sept. 25-26. Details at greenleafauthorsummit.com

Anyone viewing this chat can use discount code PROFNET for a 33% discount on tickets. For more info, reach out to Greenleaf on Twitter or email us at authorsummit@greenleafbookgroup.com.

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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Wed, 03 Sep 2014 14:45:56 -0500 http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2014/09/03/building_your_expert_brand_through_books http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2014/09/03/building_your_expert_brand_through_books On Tuesday, Sept. 2, we hosted our latest #ConnectChat, "Building Your Expert Brand Through Books," with Ashley Jones, director of marketing and business development at Greenleaf Book Group.

Jones discussed the biggest mistakes beginners make, whether you need a lot of money to promote your brand, increasing visibility, and much more.

Please follow @ProfNet and @editorev on Twitter for more information on future chats or check back right here on ProfNet Connect for details.

Ashley, please tell us about Greenleaf Book Group and what your role is there.

Greenleaf is an exciting place. Our goal is to help people with big ideas grow into recognized thought leaders. We are a hybrid book publisher and we bring together the best aspects of traditional and self-publishing. Greenleaf authors have access to our strong distribution team keep creative control, IP and most of the royalties. We also help authors think beyond the book and leverage their ideas and content in new ways.

The book publishing industry is so competitive. How do you distinguish yourself and your books from everyone else?

Books are an important thought-leadership cornerstone. To stand out, authors need an online platform and audience building. Tactics like exclusive content for email lists, feedback from beta audiences, and videos to expand messages go a long way. An audience who supports the book when it launches is a huge advantage. They are like passionate partners.

What does branding and marketing mean for authors?

Authors engage in marketing all of the time. Book signings, social media, or paid advertising are good examples. While some authors recoil at “marketing,” it’s about helping people who are interested in the author’s expertise and relationship building. Branding is part of marketing. A brand is the meaning audiences attribute to a product, service, or individual.

Do you need a lot of money to effectively promote your brand?

There are lots of brand-building tactics that authors can engage in without spending a lot of money. Authors can leverage social media, attract audiences and use creative tactics to engage their audiences. Many tactics are free or inexpensive, if an author is willing to put the energy and time into them.

How can Greenleaf help an independent author build their brand?

For authors, building brands is about knowing the audience, creating a strong message, and sharing that message. Greenleaf works with independent authors to build the right kind of brand to attract a loyal audience. The tactics we recommend depend on the author, their message, and the audience they should be reaching.

For example, a fiction author would be likely to have a very different approach than a business author.

We focus on creating a strategy, building assets like a website, a presentation, and social media presence, and finding the audience.

What are some steps a new author can take to increase their visibility so media and others see them as experts in their fields?

Building an expert brand can be challenging. The most important step is to determine audience and message. Next, it's key to make yourself look like an expert with an online presence, public speaking, and media presence. Media attention can be garnered through sites like PR Newswire or direct outreach to the press. We also recommend working with PR agencies -- a good publicist can help to build media buzz, which is invaluable.

Would you consider blogging an effective way for someone to promote their book and expertise?

Blogging is a GREAT tool for all authors. It is a venue to share ideas with a wider audience. Blogging helps to build SEO value (so you can be found online), credibility, and connect with an audience. If treated correctly, your devoted blog audience will be the first people to read and promote your book.

What are the biggest mistakes beginners make when it comes to brand?

There are two big mistakes I see authors make when building their brands, and there are easy ways to avoid both: 1) Building brand elements (i.e., website, business cards) before getting clear on a message or plan; 2) Not sticking to a brand-building plan. It's easy to get distracted; make a plan and stick to it.

It's easy to see how authors make these mistakes. Building a brand is hard work and it’s easy to lose focus. To avoid these mistakes, authors should create and stick to a plan where each step connects to long-term goals. Having a branding professional on your team helps. We know what mistakes to watch out for, the best timing, and what to focus on.

Let's take a step back. How can someone develop enough content to write a book to start their journey as an expert and build their brand?

Most people who are considering a book are surprised to find that they already have content that they can use. I love blogging as a first step -- blogging is a great way to organize and share ideas and test them on an audience. Greenleaf also helps authors to evaluate their ideas and gives feedback on concepts submitted to us.

Do people who want to work with Greenleaf need to have some of their work already published before you consider them?

No, many Greenleaf authors are first-time authors. We are highly selective, but we love working with new authors.

Some people may think this is an overnight process, but how long can it take for a new author to become a trusted expert?

Brand building is often a long process. Ask anyone who is an overnight success. They'll tell you it took years. Experts can avoid wasting time by starting their brand on the right foot -- a clear message and strong online assets.

Speaking opportunities are a good way to get visibility. How can someone go about getting those opportunities or increasing them?

Authors who want to speak need a professional presentation and a great topic to speak on. Audiences want to hear about ideas, not about the book -- they want a topic that is exciting, not a sales pitch. With a good topic and presentation, reach out to your local @NSAspeakers chapter or speakers bureau for opportunities.

Do you recommend that an author partner with another more successful one?

Partnerships with other authors, businesses, or organizations are always beneficial for new authors. Those brands have audiences who may be excited about a new author's ideas -- access to their audience is great. It's key for new authors to think about what they can offer partners. Speaking or promotion are a few options.

What role does social media play? What should an author be doing to drive sales and visibility?

Social media is great for building interest and sharing ideas. Staying active and sharing relevant info is key.

It's key to give value to an audience, not be focused on self-promotion. People love authors who provide value. That's true everywhere, especially in social media. I want to follow someone who gives me great info. Don't you? Social is helpful in book sales, but it's not a direct link. Social media is about relationships, not sales. That said, authors with truly strong social media followings often see strong book sales.

Greenleaf Book Group has a conference coming up. What's it about?

Greenleaf's Summit is about helping authors build brands, books, and connect with each other. We'll go into details about the topics above, and others for new and experienced authors.

When and where is it and how can an author register?

The summit is in Austin, Texas, Sept. 25-26. Details at greenleafauthorsummit.com

Anyone viewing this chat can use discount code PROFNET for a 33% discount on tickets. For more info, reach out to Greenleaf on Twitter or email us at authorsummit@greenleafbookgroup.com.

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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Upcoming #ConnectChat: Building Your Expert Brand Through Books Our next #ConnectChat, "Building Your Expert Brand Through Books" will feature Ashley Jones, (@GreenleafBookGR), the director of marketing and business development at Greenleaf Book Group in Austin, Texas.

Ashley will discuss how to establish yourself as an expert, building a brand through your book(s), growing your audience and much more.

The chat will take place Tuesday, September 2 from 3 to 4:30 p.m, EDT. To submit questions for Ashley in advance, please email profnetconnect@prnewswire.com or tweet your question to @ProfNet or @editorev.

We'll try to get to as many questions as we can. Of course, you can also ask your question live during the chat. To help you keep track of the conversation, we’ll use the #connectchat hashtag. Please use that hashtag if you are tweeting a question or participating in the chat.

If you can't make it to the chat, don't worry -- a transcript will be provided on ProfNet Connect the next day.

About Ashley Jones

Ashley is the director of marketing and business development at Greenleaf Book Group.

She is a results-oriented, creative marketing professional with experience in marketing strategy, brand architecture, and program creation for top brands and thought leaders. Throughout her career, she has created successful marketing campaigns including award-winning advertising and highly targeted word-of-mouth programs. At Greenleaf, she is using her strategic skills to help authors build their brands and connect with audience

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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Thu, 28 Aug 2014 12:50:27 -0500 http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2014/08/28/upcoming_connectchat:_building_your_expert_brand_through_books http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2014/08/28/upcoming_connectchat:_building_your_expert_brand_through_books Our next #ConnectChat, "Building Your Expert Brand Through Books" will feature Ashley Jones, (@GreenleafBookGR), the director of marketing and business development at Greenleaf Book Group in Austin, Texas.

Ashley will discuss how to establish yourself as an expert, building a brand through your book(s), growing your audience and much more.

The chat will take place Tuesday, September 2 from 3 to 4:30 p.m, EDT. To submit questions for Ashley in advance, please email profnetconnect@prnewswire.com or tweet your question to @ProfNet or @editorev.

We'll try to get to as many questions as we can. Of course, you can also ask your question live during the chat. To help you keep track of the conversation, we’ll use the #connectchat hashtag. Please use that hashtag if you are tweeting a question or participating in the chat.

If you can't make it to the chat, don't worry -- a transcript will be provided on ProfNet Connect the next day.

About Ashley Jones

Ashley is the director of marketing and business development at Greenleaf Book Group.

She is a results-oriented, creative marketing professional with experience in marketing strategy, brand architecture, and program creation for top brands and thought leaders. Throughout her career, she has created successful marketing campaigns including award-winning advertising and highly targeted word-of-mouth programs. At Greenleaf, she is using her strategic skills to help authors build their brands and connect with audience

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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