Evelyn Tipacti's blog listings. Feed Zend_Feed_Writer 1.10.8 (http://framework.zend.com) http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti PR 411: Tips for Getting Hired in PR

Who doesn’t want to work for a great PR company? If you’re looking for work in the field, Charles Lankester, senior vice-president with Ruder Finn, provides 11 tips for PR job-seekers.

PR Week’s article, “How to get hired by a PR firm in 2015,” shares Lankester’s advice, also seen here below:

Over the past week I heard of two cases where very academically bright candidates delivered poor quality (read: dreadful) interviews. Book smart and street stupid is a dangerous combination in 2015, in any industry. I thought I would share a few notes on how to maximize your chances of getting hired into a PR firm.

1.    Understand what public relations is in 2015. It’s not about building relationships, events or making connections. It’s increasingly a data-driven, carefully planned and strategic business that should deliver measurable business outcomes.  You must be able to define public relations from an industry standpoint—and ideally offer your own definition.

2.    Understand the industry. Read the trade media. Learn about the latest campaigns, client moves, industry trends, client wins and losses. Get to know the industry lexicon. Have an opinion on campaigns. Did any of them impact or impress you? Why? Why not? Again, it is vital to have a point of view.

3.    Research your potential employer. Find out where they do business, who are their biggest clients and research their strategy/positioning. Immerse yourself in their world. Research and understand their product and service names. Find out about their latest developments, people moves, hires, client wins. The more you sound like an insider, the more impressed we will be.

4.    Getting the interview. It’s always better to be introduced via a friend of the firm or a client, but we tend to be a fairly egalitarian industry. We have also all "been there" looking for work. Hint: research the CEO/MD of the office where you want to work and email her/him directly. Establish yourself as an individual with the boss vs. be one of many CVs sent to him/her by the HR department. Hint: Don’t wait for a job to be advertised! If you like and respect the firm, write in and seek an interview. This kind of "can do" initiative and approach always impresses.

5.    Social and digital insight. You must understand this area and have a point of view. What new knowledge or insight can you bring? What are the hot three social media platforms in China that we should care about? Why? If you write a thought piece like this you will automatically be in the Top 5 percent of candidates. But is has to be good and it has to be original! We also look carefully at your social media profile, so have a decent LinkedIn, Facebook and/or Twitter presence.

 6.    Make a big effort with your first communication. Be memorable.

To continue reading, please click here.

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. All you have to do is fill out a quick form telling us what you’re looking for, your deadline, and how you want to be contacted, and we’ll send it to the appropriate experts in our network. The best part? It’s free! Get started here: Send a query.

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Thu, 16 Apr 2015 17:05:51 -0500 http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/04/16/pr_411:_tips_for_getting_hired_in_pr http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/04/16/pr_411:_tips_for_getting_hired_in_pr

Who doesn’t want to work for a great PR company? If you’re looking for work in the field, Charles Lankester, senior vice-president with Ruder Finn, provides 11 tips for PR job-seekers.

PR Week’s article, “How to get hired by a PR firm in 2015,” shares Lankester’s advice, also seen here below:

Over the past week I heard of two cases where very academically bright candidates delivered poor quality (read: dreadful) interviews. Book smart and street stupid is a dangerous combination in 2015, in any industry. I thought I would share a few notes on how to maximize your chances of getting hired into a PR firm.

1.    Understand what public relations is in 2015. It’s not about building relationships, events or making connections. It’s increasingly a data-driven, carefully planned and strategic business that should deliver measurable business outcomes.  You must be able to define public relations from an industry standpoint—and ideally offer your own definition.

2.    Understand the industry. Read the trade media. Learn about the latest campaigns, client moves, industry trends, client wins and losses. Get to know the industry lexicon. Have an opinion on campaigns. Did any of them impact or impress you? Why? Why not? Again, it is vital to have a point of view.

3.    Research your potential employer. Find out where they do business, who are their biggest clients and research their strategy/positioning. Immerse yourself in their world. Research and understand their product and service names. Find out about their latest developments, people moves, hires, client wins. The more you sound like an insider, the more impressed we will be.

4.    Getting the interview. It’s always better to be introduced via a friend of the firm or a client, but we tend to be a fairly egalitarian industry. We have also all "been there" looking for work. Hint: research the CEO/MD of the office where you want to work and email her/him directly. Establish yourself as an individual with the boss vs. be one of many CVs sent to him/her by the HR department. Hint: Don’t wait for a job to be advertised! If you like and respect the firm, write in and seek an interview. This kind of "can do" initiative and approach always impresses.

5.    Social and digital insight. You must understand this area and have a point of view. What new knowledge or insight can you bring? What are the hot three social media platforms in China that we should care about? Why? If you write a thought piece like this you will automatically be in the Top 5 percent of candidates. But is has to be good and it has to be original! We also look carefully at your social media profile, so have a decent LinkedIn, Facebook and/or Twitter presence.

 6.    Make a big effort with your first communication. Be memorable.

To continue reading, please click here.

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. All you have to do is fill out a quick form telling us what you’re looking for, your deadline, and how you want to be contacted, and we’ll send it to the appropriate experts in our network. The best part? It’s free! Get started here: Send a query.

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Media 411: Instagram for Journalists

Are you a journalist who doesn't use Instagram?

You may be a bit apprehensive and may not want yet another tool to learn. If you don’t use Instagram, below are several articles that may change your mind.

Instagram can be an excellent tool for journalists:

Are you a writer in need of experts? Send a ProfNet query -- it's easy and free! Just submit your request here: Send a query.

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Thu, 09 Apr 2015 17:54:07 -0500 http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/04/09/media_411:_instagram_for_journalists http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/04/09/media_411:_instagram_for_journalists

Are you a journalist who doesn't use Instagram?

You may be a bit apprehensive and may not want yet another tool to learn. If you don’t use Instagram, below are several articles that may change your mind.

Instagram can be an excellent tool for journalists:

Are you a writer in need of experts? Send a ProfNet query -- it's easy and free! Just submit your request here: Send a query.

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Transitioning to Freelancing and Book Writing On Tuesday, March 31, we hosted our latest #ConnectChat, "Transitioning to Freelancing and Book Writing," with Randy Dotinga (@rdotinga), president of the American Society of Journalists and Authors (ASJA -- @ASJAhq).

Randy discussed the difficulties writers face when embarking upon a freelance career, the financial preparations that are important to make, time management and first steps.

He also touched upon how an expert should approach writing a book for the first time and many other issues facing those who want a career as a freelance writer. 

Please follow @ProfNet and @editorev on Twitter for more information on future chats or check back right here on ProfNet Connect for details.

Randy, can you please tell us about yourself?

I've been a full-time freelance writer since 1999. Before that, I was a daily newspaper reporter. It's amazing that I've been doing this since 1999, considering that I'm only 25 years old. But moving on...

I'm now president of @asjahq. We're 1,200 freelance writers and non-fiction authors from North America and beyond. We think of ourselves as the voice of independent writers and a resource to help writers survive and thrive.

What is the most difficult part about transitioning to FT freelance writing?

Having to hustle in a very different way than you do in a newsroom. Personal connections are more important too. It can be difficult for writers who are used to a lot more structure and predictability.

Is there something people making the transition should expect that they may not have thought about before?

Be ready to keep track of finances in a whole new way. You are now a business & need to think like one re: taxes, etc.

How should one start preparing financially for the switch?

Save money! Get your health insurance in order if you’re leaving a job. Understand how self-employment taxes work. An accountant can be helpful, although you may not need one, since you’ll be making quarterly tax payments.

Can you please elaborate?

If you have a staff job, you pay taxes every paycheck. The IRS wants taxes over year from self-employed types too! When you're self-employed, you pay taxes quarterly. You estimate how much you owe & write a check to our pals at IRS.

Is a 100% switch necessary or can you adequately work as a freelancer while also pursuing other interests?

You can definitely be a part-time freelancer, and lots of people do that. No need for full-time!

What sort of business savvy do you have to have to be a freelancer?

You need to always think about the money you’re making: Are you making enough per week, per month, per year? Know about business expenses and how to take every single one that you can: Conferences, books & magazines, your phone

Time management is very important – what advice do you have for those who may not have great time mgmt. skills?

I’m not the best person to ask, since I’m pretty ADHD. (SQUIRREL!) But...

If you don’t have good time-management skills, set a firm schedule. 9-5 weekdays, maybe. Make yourself follow rules.

Should you quit your job before starting or is a building a base a better idea first?

Definitely build a base! Use all the free time you have: Time before and after work, vacations, weekends. Some people don’t want to spend the time since they don’t want to be working all the time. Too bad. You have to do it.

What advice can you give an individual leaving college and pursuing a career as a journalist?

I'd suggest a staff job. You learn so much on the job that's crucial for a journalism career!

Journalists who’ve never freelanced often don’t know how to get started with a freelance career. What’s the first thing they need to do?

Go to a writers conference like ASJA’s, coming up April 30-May 2 in NYC! Other conferences are almost as good. If you can’t go to a conference, download conference recordings to give you insight. Did I mention that it's important for freelancers to be self-promotional at all times?

What sort of topics are covered at these conferences?

We talk about networking, marketing, craft of writing & making it in various genres of journalism. It's a mix of sessions about the business and the art of freelancing (and book writing too).

How can you make yourself stand out from so many other writers?

Make editors’ lives easier: Have good pitches. Be reliable. File your stories on time. Be low on drama.

What are some of the top mistakes that writers make when they try to transition into freelancing?

Don’t forget the personal touch. 99% of my work has come because I knew someone or knew someone who knew someone. If you work in isolation & are constantly cold calling (or cold e-mailing) editors, it's very tough to break out. It makes a big difference to an editor when you can drop a name in the subject line of an email pitch. You stand out.

Doctors, professors and many other experts want to write their own books but also don’t know what first step to take. What do you suggest?

Think about your expertise. If you’re a doctor, you need a medical writer. You could try the Health Writers Association. There are associations (with author/freelance members) for just about every genre of journalism. ASJA is made up of all types of independent writers, so you could try us to get hooked up with a writer.

How do people transition from freelancing into book writing?

One big tip: Learn how things work: Understand what a book proposal is. Don’t write the whole book first. Write about a topic you’ve already written about. Draw upon your existing work and save time.

What sorts of journalists should NOT try for a freelance career?

Those who aren’t flexible, who like things very planned-out and predictable.

How do you make personal connections when you have a staff journalism job?

Conferences are important to help you meet editors. But you can also use social media to meet editors and writers. Remember, it's important to meet writers too. Other writers are often the source of tips about freelance gigs.

I think there's a misconception out there that freelancers don't usually like to help other freelancers, perhaps due to fear of competition. What's your perspective?

True to an extent. But many successful freelancers are generous, and not just to be goody-goody. Connections=success. Also, freelancers can't take every gig they hear about. We often refer editors to other writers. For example, you may get offered a story for Cat Fancy but you're allergic to cats. You can pass it on.

Is it possible to make a living as a freelancer?

Yes! It's an absolute myth that it's impossible. We have members making 6 figures a year. Not everyone will succeed at freelancing. It's hard work. But plenty of writers survive AND thrive.

Randy, can you please tell us a bit more about the ASJA conference in NY? Website? Registration info?

It's from April 30-May 2 in Manhattan. The public is invited! For schedule and registration: www.asjaconferences.org/asja2015/ 

Are you a writer in need of experts? Send a ProfNet query -- it's easy and free! Just submit your request here: Send a query.

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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Thu, 02 Apr 2015 14:39:05 -0500 http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/04/02/transitioning_to_freelancing_and_book_writing http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/04/02/transitioning_to_freelancing_and_book_writing On Tuesday, March 31, we hosted our latest #ConnectChat, "Transitioning to Freelancing and Book Writing," with Randy Dotinga (@rdotinga), president of the American Society of Journalists and Authors (ASJA -- @ASJAhq).

Randy discussed the difficulties writers face when embarking upon a freelance career, the financial preparations that are important to make, time management and first steps.

He also touched upon how an expert should approach writing a book for the first time and many other issues facing those who want a career as a freelance writer. 

Please follow @ProfNet and @editorev on Twitter for more information on future chats or check back right here on ProfNet Connect for details.

Randy, can you please tell us about yourself?

I've been a full-time freelance writer since 1999. Before that, I was a daily newspaper reporter. It's amazing that I've been doing this since 1999, considering that I'm only 25 years old. But moving on...

I'm now president of @asjahq. We're 1,200 freelance writers and non-fiction authors from North America and beyond. We think of ourselves as the voice of independent writers and a resource to help writers survive and thrive.

What is the most difficult part about transitioning to FT freelance writing?

Having to hustle in a very different way than you do in a newsroom. Personal connections are more important too. It can be difficult for writers who are used to a lot more structure and predictability.

Is there something people making the transition should expect that they may not have thought about before?

Be ready to keep track of finances in a whole new way. You are now a business & need to think like one re: taxes, etc.

How should one start preparing financially for the switch?

Save money! Get your health insurance in order if you’re leaving a job. Understand how self-employment taxes work. An accountant can be helpful, although you may not need one, since you’ll be making quarterly tax payments.

Can you please elaborate?

If you have a staff job, you pay taxes every paycheck. The IRS wants taxes over year from self-employed types too! When you're self-employed, you pay taxes quarterly. You estimate how much you owe & write a check to our pals at IRS.

Is a 100% switch necessary or can you adequately work as a freelancer while also pursuing other interests?

You can definitely be a part-time freelancer, and lots of people do that. No need for full-time!

What sort of business savvy do you have to have to be a freelancer?

You need to always think about the money you’re making: Are you making enough per week, per month, per year? Know about business expenses and how to take every single one that you can: Conferences, books & magazines, your phone

Time management is very important – what advice do you have for those who may not have great time mgmt. skills?

I’m not the best person to ask, since I’m pretty ADHD. (SQUIRREL!) But...

If you don’t have good time-management skills, set a firm schedule. 9-5 weekdays, maybe. Make yourself follow rules.

Should you quit your job before starting or is a building a base a better idea first?

Definitely build a base! Use all the free time you have: Time before and after work, vacations, weekends. Some people don’t want to spend the time since they don’t want to be working all the time. Too bad. You have to do it.

What advice can you give an individual leaving college and pursuing a career as a journalist?

I'd suggest a staff job. You learn so much on the job that's crucial for a journalism career!

Journalists who’ve never freelanced often don’t know how to get started with a freelance career. What’s the first thing they need to do?

Go to a writers conference like ASJA’s, coming up April 30-May 2 in NYC! Other conferences are almost as good. If you can’t go to a conference, download conference recordings to give you insight. Did I mention that it's important for freelancers to be self-promotional at all times?

What sort of topics are covered at these conferences?

We talk about networking, marketing, craft of writing & making it in various genres of journalism. It's a mix of sessions about the business and the art of freelancing (and book writing too).

How can you make yourself stand out from so many other writers?

Make editors’ lives easier: Have good pitches. Be reliable. File your stories on time. Be low on drama.

What are some of the top mistakes that writers make when they try to transition into freelancing?

Don’t forget the personal touch. 99% of my work has come because I knew someone or knew someone who knew someone. If you work in isolation & are constantly cold calling (or cold e-mailing) editors, it's very tough to break out. It makes a big difference to an editor when you can drop a name in the subject line of an email pitch. You stand out.

Doctors, professors and many other experts want to write their own books but also don’t know what first step to take. What do you suggest?

Think about your expertise. If you’re a doctor, you need a medical writer. You could try the Health Writers Association. There are associations (with author/freelance members) for just about every genre of journalism. ASJA is made up of all types of independent writers, so you could try us to get hooked up with a writer.

How do people transition from freelancing into book writing?

One big tip: Learn how things work: Understand what a book proposal is. Don’t write the whole book first. Write about a topic you’ve already written about. Draw upon your existing work and save time.

What sorts of journalists should NOT try for a freelance career?

Those who aren’t flexible, who like things very planned-out and predictable.

How do you make personal connections when you have a staff journalism job?

Conferences are important to help you meet editors. But you can also use social media to meet editors and writers. Remember, it's important to meet writers too. Other writers are often the source of tips about freelance gigs.

I think there's a misconception out there that freelancers don't usually like to help other freelancers, perhaps due to fear of competition. What's your perspective?

True to an extent. But many successful freelancers are generous, and not just to be goody-goody. Connections=success. Also, freelancers can't take every gig they hear about. We often refer editors to other writers. For example, you may get offered a story for Cat Fancy but you're allergic to cats. You can pass it on.

Is it possible to make a living as a freelancer?

Yes! It's an absolute myth that it's impossible. We have members making 6 figures a year. Not everyone will succeed at freelancing. It's hard work. But plenty of writers survive AND thrive.

Randy, can you please tell us a bit more about the ASJA conference in NY? Website? Registration info?

It's from April 30-May 2 in Manhattan. The public is invited! For schedule and registration: www.asjaconferences.org/asja2015/ 

Are you a writer in need of experts? Send a ProfNet query -- it's easy and free! Just submit your request here: Send a query.

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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PR 411: Ways to Get New Clients Who doesn’t love a list of lists, right?

This week’s PR 411 wants to help you get customers!

With that in mind, we’ve created a list of ten articles from the web that give their suggestions for acquiring clients.

Whether you're in PR or another industry, these articles are sure to give you some ideas. Good Luck!


Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. All you have to do is fill out a quick form telling us what you’re looking for, your deadline, and how you want to be contacted, and we’ll send it to the appropriate experts in our network. The best part? It’s free! Get started here: Send a query.

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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Fri, 27 Mar 2015 13:15:19 -0500 http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/03/27/pr_411:_ways_to_get_new_clients http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/03/27/pr_411:_ways_to_get_new_clients Who doesn’t love a list of lists, right?

This week’s PR 411 wants to help you get customers!

With that in mind, we’ve created a list of ten articles from the web that give their suggestions for acquiring clients.

Whether you're in PR or another industry, these articles are sure to give you some ideas. Good Luck!


Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. All you have to do is fill out a quick form telling us what you’re looking for, your deadline, and how you want to be contacted, and we’ll send it to the appropriate experts in our network. The best part? It’s free! Get started here: Send a query.

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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Upcoming #ConnectChat: Transitioning to Freelancing and Book Writing Our next #ConnectChat, “Transitioning to Freelancing and Book Writing" will feature Randy Dotinga (@rdotinga), president of the American Society of Journalists and Authors (ASJA).

Journalists who’ve worked in the business for years who may find themselves out of work or needing more income may not know how to get started in the world of freelancing. This #ConnectChat will partially focus on helping current journalists get writing assignments or even start full-time freelance writing careers.

Experts will also want to consider joining the #ConnectChat as Randy will address the issue of breaking into book writing if one is an expert looking to become an author.

Randy will be using the ASJA handle, @ASJAhq during the chat.

The chat will take place Tuesday, March 31, 2015, 3-4 p.m, EDT.

To submit questions for Randy in advance, please email profnetconnect@prnewswire.com or tweet your question to @ProfNet or @editorev.

We'll try to get to as many questions as we can. Of course, you can also ask your question live during the chat. To help you keep track of the conversation, we’ll use the #connectchat hashtag. Please use that hashtag if you are tweeting a question or participating in the chat.

If you can't make it to the chat, don't worry -- a transcript will be provided on ProfNet Connect the next day.

About Randy Dotinga 

Dotinga, a journalist with more than two decades of professional experience, has written for dozens of magazines, newspapers and online news sites.

He is president of the American Society of Journalists & Authors, a non-profit organization devoted to serving freelance writers and book authors.

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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Thu, 26 Mar 2015 09:59:50 -0500 http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/03/26/upcoming_connectchat:_transitioning_to_freelancing_and_book_writing http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/03/26/upcoming_connectchat:_transitioning_to_freelancing_and_book_writing Our next #ConnectChat, “Transitioning to Freelancing and Book Writing" will feature Randy Dotinga (@rdotinga), president of the American Society of Journalists and Authors (ASJA).

Journalists who’ve worked in the business for years who may find themselves out of work or needing more income may not know how to get started in the world of freelancing. This #ConnectChat will partially focus on helping current journalists get writing assignments or even start full-time freelance writing careers.

Experts will also want to consider joining the #ConnectChat as Randy will address the issue of breaking into book writing if one is an expert looking to become an author.

Randy will be using the ASJA handle, @ASJAhq during the chat.

The chat will take place Tuesday, March 31, 2015, 3-4 p.m, EDT.

To submit questions for Randy in advance, please email profnetconnect@prnewswire.com or tweet your question to @ProfNet or @editorev.

We'll try to get to as many questions as we can. Of course, you can also ask your question live during the chat. To help you keep track of the conversation, we’ll use the #connectchat hashtag. Please use that hashtag if you are tweeting a question or participating in the chat.

If you can't make it to the chat, don't worry -- a transcript will be provided on ProfNet Connect the next day.

About Randy Dotinga 

Dotinga, a journalist with more than two decades of professional experience, has written for dozens of magazines, newspapers and online news sites.

He is president of the American Society of Journalists & Authors, a non-profit organization devoted to serving freelance writers and book authors.

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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