Evelyn Tipacti's blog listings. Feed Zend_Feed_Writer 1.10.8 (http://framework.zend.com) http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti PR 411: Ways to Get New Clients Who doesn’t love a list of lists, right?

This week’s PR 411 wants to help you get customers!

With that in mind, we’ve created a list of ten articles from the web that give their suggestions for acquiring clients.

Whether you're in PR or another industry, these articles are sure to give you some ideas. Good Luck!


Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. All you have to do is fill out a quick form telling us what you’re looking for, your deadline, and how you want to be contacted, and we’ll send it to the appropriate experts in our network. The best part? It’s free! Get started here: Send a query.

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Fri, 27 Mar 2015 13:15:19 -0500 http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/03/27/pr_411:_ways_to_get_new_clients http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/03/27/pr_411:_ways_to_get_new_clients Who doesn’t love a list of lists, right?

This week’s PR 411 wants to help you get customers!

With that in mind, we’ve created a list of ten articles from the web that give their suggestions for acquiring clients.

Whether you're in PR or another industry, these articles are sure to give you some ideas. Good Luck!


Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. All you have to do is fill out a quick form telling us what you’re looking for, your deadline, and how you want to be contacted, and we’ll send it to the appropriate experts in our network. The best part? It’s free! Get started here: Send a query.

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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Upcoming #ConnectChat: Transitioning to Freelancing and Book Writing Our next #ConnectChat, “Transitioning to Freelancing and Book Writing" will feature Randy Dotinga (@rdotinga), president of the American Society of Journalists and Authors (ASJA).

Journalists who’ve worked in the business for years who may find themselves out of work or needing more income may not know how to get started in the world of freelancing. This #ConnectChat will partially focus on helping current journalists get writing assignments or even start full-time freelance writing careers.

Experts will also want to consider joining the #ConnectChat as Randy will address the issue of breaking into book writing if one is an expert looking to become an author.

The chat will take place Tuesday, March 31, 2015, 3-4 p.m, EDT.

To submit questions for Randy in advance, please email profnetconnect@prnewswire.com or tweet your question to @ProfNet or @editorev.

We'll try to get to as many questions as we can. Of course, you can also ask your question live during the chat. To help you keep track of the conversation, we’ll use the #connectchat hashtag. Please use that hashtag if you are tweeting a question or participating in the chat.

If you can't make it to the chat, don't worry -- a transcript will be provided on ProfNet Connect the next day.

About Randy Dotinga 

Dotinga, a journalist with more than two decades of professional experience, has written for dozens of magazines, newspapers and online news sites.

He is president of the American Society of Journalists & Authors, a non-profit organization devoted to serving freelance writers and book authors.

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

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Thu, 26 Mar 2015 09:59:50 -0500 http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/03/26/upcoming_connectchat:_transitioning_to_freelancing_and_book_writing http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/03/26/upcoming_connectchat:_transitioning_to_freelancing_and_book_writing Our next #ConnectChat, “Transitioning to Freelancing and Book Writing" will feature Randy Dotinga (@rdotinga), president of the American Society of Journalists and Authors (ASJA).

Journalists who’ve worked in the business for years who may find themselves out of work or needing more income may not know how to get started in the world of freelancing. This #ConnectChat will partially focus on helping current journalists get writing assignments or even start full-time freelance writing careers.

Experts will also want to consider joining the #ConnectChat as Randy will address the issue of breaking into book writing if one is an expert looking to become an author.

The chat will take place Tuesday, March 31, 2015, 3-4 p.m, EDT.

To submit questions for Randy in advance, please email profnetconnect@prnewswire.com or tweet your question to @ProfNet or @editorev.

We'll try to get to as many questions as we can. Of course, you can also ask your question live during the chat. To help you keep track of the conversation, we’ll use the #connectchat hashtag. Please use that hashtag if you are tweeting a question or participating in the chat.

If you can't make it to the chat, don't worry -- a transcript will be provided on ProfNet Connect the next day.

About Randy Dotinga 

Dotinga, a journalist with more than two decades of professional experience, has written for dozens of magazines, newspapers and online news sites.

He is president of the American Society of Journalists & Authors, a non-profit organization devoted to serving freelance writers and book authors.

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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Journalist Spotlight: Kristi Gustafson Barlette, Times Union Welcome to our SPOTLIGHT feature, where we highlight a journalist and ProfNet user to share their personal story and insight with you.

This SPOTLIGHT belongs to Kristi Gustafson Barlette, an editor at the Times Union, a Hearst publication in upstate New York where she recently became the real estate and Solutions editor.

Previously, her “On the Edge” blog on TimesUnion.com was the region’s most widely read lifestyle and pop culture blog. She's won multiple awards for blogging and writing, including first place in the American Association of Sunday and Features Editors Excellence in Feature Writing and first place in the state Associated Press award for blogging. She has numerous “Best Of” honors for blogging, reporting and Tweeting.

Her Life 3.0 column, focused on issues facing thirty-somethings, often appeared in large metro papers such as the Detroit Free Press, the Miami Herald and the Houston Chronicle. 

Kristi has a weekly segment on WFLY-FM, the area’s top 40 radio station, where she talks about everything from fashion and relationships to pop culture and social media. 

We hope you find Kristi's SPOTLIGHT both enjoyable and informative.

Did you always want to be a journalist?

No. When I was really young, I aspired to be a veterinarian, but severe allergies (and a weak interest in science) put the kabosh on that one. In eighth grade, I attended a day-long program for girls and heard NBC’s Chris Jansing (Chris Kapostasy, at the time) speak. She was a local TV journalist who talked about how each day was different, and exciting, and how she was always learning. She also shared stories of the people she met, and the experiences she had, including a bit about riding in a helicopter with her feet hanging down, nearly brushing the tops of trees. I got home from school that day and told my parents I wanted to be a journalist.

Can you tell us about your first job as a professional journalist?

I worked as an editorial assistant in the features department at the Times Union right out of college. I did all the things you may expect -- filing, sorting mail, answering phones, compiling calendars -- but also took on every story I could get. If no one else was interested, I’d volunteer. This lead me to write about everything from potholes to potheads to pot racks. Seeing my first byline in print was, possibly, more exhilarating than if my feet were brushing tree tops.

What type of stories do you like to cover the most?

The wonderful thing about social media is we know -- instantly -- what people care about. What they’re thinking. What matters. I love telling the stories that resonate with readers -- stories that make them think and, perhaps, cause them to alter their view or opinion.

In the more traditional sense, everyone, truly, has a story. Sometimes you just need to dig a little to find out what that tale may be. Sharing the trials and triumphs of everyday people who live in our area (or have a connection to the region) is enriching.

You work for the Times Union and also have a radio segment on WFLY – what do you like most about each medium?

With print journalism you have the time -- and space -- to explore topics at a deep, rich level. Thanks to blogs, you can have an ongoing dialogue with readers -- sometimes that dialogue lasts for days, even weeks.

Radio is live and fast-paced and you have to be quick-witted. I thrive on the “nerves” that can crop up seconds before you’re on-air. The entertainment value that (naturally) comes with live banter is awesome.

In both mediums, one of the greatest compliments is “you make me laugh.” That, for my beat, is a success.

Do you make suggestions regarding the stories you cover or are they assigned to you most of the time?

A little of both. Editors love when you have a suggestion, but they also appreciate a writer willing to tackle a topic or subject they assign.

Is there a best part to being a journalist and having your specific role?

Like Chris Jansing said nearly two decades ago, journalism really is different every day. I thrive on the unknown, and love a job that sometimes (often?) causes me to pivot. Your brain is always working, and thanks to social media, email, etc. you’re in a position where you pretty much always know what your “customer” (the reader) thinks. Feedback is essential to success so I love that we now have the platforms that make this instant interactivity possible.

What advice to do you have for those in PR or anyone else who may want to pitch you a story idea?

If it’s got a local tie, tell us that in the subject line of your email (we love local). Creative ideas that spin off of current events are always welcome. Do some quick research on the writer before sending your pitch. Resist putting the “urgent” status on email. Keep the initial message short and on-topic (bullet points highlighting the details are extraordinary).

What should they always do and never do?

Other than what I said in the question above, by all means, please, please, please do not sign your email XOXO. (I see this more often than you would imagine).

How can someone in PR get to know you and develop that important connection so that trust can be built?

Social media connections are invaluable. Follow writers and editors on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Connect with them on LinkedIn. Establish a professional relationship outside of the pitch. That way, when you do propose a topic, your name/company is familiar.

Do you have advice for members who respond to ProfNet queries?

Offer a sentence, or three, giving the reporter an idea of your client’s position on the topic. Just saying so-and-so is a psychologist with 20 years experience doesn’t show much. But, if you say all that and add a short paragraph outlining where the expert stands on the subject the reporter is covering, the writer can better decide if the expert may be a good fit.

What type of experts do you prefer to work with?

I’ve yet to find any group of experts off-putting. It’s less about the type of expert, and more about the person. Some experts approach their pitches better than others (ex: reaching out when you aren’t well versed on the topic doesn’t really benefit you, or the writer).

Can you tell us about your favorite or most challenging assignment?

Challenges on the front-side (AKA during the reporting) are often mitigated by a good editor. I’ve been really, really lucky to have amazing editors.

The challenges I notice are those that happen after the story runs -- the ones you don’t expect. Many years ago I wrote about laser hair removal and the art/illustration was a (modest) two-piece bathing suit hanging on a clothesline. People declared me immoral and disgusting and called for my job (they didn’t think we should write about hair removal, especially of the bikini line-kind). Another time, I blogged about a roadside memorial, and had readers threaten me physically. Death threats happen, and they don’t get less scary. I’ve been criticized for everything from my appearance to my views to the clothes I wear or the car I drive to the topics I cover or how well I write. While you can certainly “shut out” those views, you don’t want readers to feel you don’t respect their position, or that they’re being ignored. Finding a balance is tough, and often challenging.

How do use social media at work?

Social media is excellent for crowdsourcing, understanding what interests readers most and even finding expert sources or story ideas.

If someone want to contact you, what’s the best way to do so?

Email:

Twitter -- @JustKristi

Facebook -- Facebook.com/JustKristiOnline

Website -- JustKristi.com

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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Fri, 20 Mar 2015 12:29:21 -0500 http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/03/20/journalist_spotlight:_kristi_gustafson_barlette,_times_union http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/03/20/journalist_spotlight:_kristi_gustafson_barlette,_times_union Welcome to our SPOTLIGHT feature, where we highlight a journalist and ProfNet user to share their personal story and insight with you.

This SPOTLIGHT belongs to Kristi Gustafson Barlette, an editor at the Times Union, a Hearst publication in upstate New York where she recently became the real estate and Solutions editor.

Previously, her “On the Edge” blog on TimesUnion.com was the region’s most widely read lifestyle and pop culture blog. She's won multiple awards for blogging and writing, including first place in the American Association of Sunday and Features Editors Excellence in Feature Writing and first place in the state Associated Press award for blogging. She has numerous “Best Of” honors for blogging, reporting and Tweeting.

Her Life 3.0 column, focused on issues facing thirty-somethings, often appeared in large metro papers such as the Detroit Free Press, the Miami Herald and the Houston Chronicle. 

Kristi has a weekly segment on WFLY-FM, the area’s top 40 radio station, where she talks about everything from fashion and relationships to pop culture and social media. 

We hope you find Kristi's SPOTLIGHT both enjoyable and informative.

Did you always want to be a journalist?

No. When I was really young, I aspired to be a veterinarian, but severe allergies (and a weak interest in science) put the kabosh on that one. In eighth grade, I attended a day-long program for girls and heard NBC’s Chris Jansing (Chris Kapostasy, at the time) speak. She was a local TV journalist who talked about how each day was different, and exciting, and how she was always learning. She also shared stories of the people she met, and the experiences she had, including a bit about riding in a helicopter with her feet hanging down, nearly brushing the tops of trees. I got home from school that day and told my parents I wanted to be a journalist.

Can you tell us about your first job as a professional journalist?

I worked as an editorial assistant in the features department at the Times Union right out of college. I did all the things you may expect -- filing, sorting mail, answering phones, compiling calendars -- but also took on every story I could get. If no one else was interested, I’d volunteer. This lead me to write about everything from potholes to potheads to pot racks. Seeing my first byline in print was, possibly, more exhilarating than if my feet were brushing tree tops.

What type of stories do you like to cover the most?

The wonderful thing about social media is we know -- instantly -- what people care about. What they’re thinking. What matters. I love telling the stories that resonate with readers -- stories that make them think and, perhaps, cause them to alter their view or opinion.

In the more traditional sense, everyone, truly, has a story. Sometimes you just need to dig a little to find out what that tale may be. Sharing the trials and triumphs of everyday people who live in our area (or have a connection to the region) is enriching.

You work for the Times Union and also have a radio segment on WFLY – what do you like most about each medium?

With print journalism you have the time -- and space -- to explore topics at a deep, rich level. Thanks to blogs, you can have an ongoing dialogue with readers -- sometimes that dialogue lasts for days, even weeks.

Radio is live and fast-paced and you have to be quick-witted. I thrive on the “nerves” that can crop up seconds before you’re on-air. The entertainment value that (naturally) comes with live banter is awesome.

In both mediums, one of the greatest compliments is “you make me laugh.” That, for my beat, is a success.

Do you make suggestions regarding the stories you cover or are they assigned to you most of the time?

A little of both. Editors love when you have a suggestion, but they also appreciate a writer willing to tackle a topic or subject they assign.

Is there a best part to being a journalist and having your specific role?

Like Chris Jansing said nearly two decades ago, journalism really is different every day. I thrive on the unknown, and love a job that sometimes (often?) causes me to pivot. Your brain is always working, and thanks to social media, email, etc. you’re in a position where you pretty much always know what your “customer” (the reader) thinks. Feedback is essential to success so I love that we now have the platforms that make this instant interactivity possible.

What advice to do you have for those in PR or anyone else who may want to pitch you a story idea?

If it’s got a local tie, tell us that in the subject line of your email (we love local). Creative ideas that spin off of current events are always welcome. Do some quick research on the writer before sending your pitch. Resist putting the “urgent” status on email. Keep the initial message short and on-topic (bullet points highlighting the details are extraordinary).

What should they always do and never do?

Other than what I said in the question above, by all means, please, please, please do not sign your email XOXO. (I see this more often than you would imagine).

How can someone in PR get to know you and develop that important connection so that trust can be built?

Social media connections are invaluable. Follow writers and editors on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Connect with them on LinkedIn. Establish a professional relationship outside of the pitch. That way, when you do propose a topic, your name/company is familiar.

Do you have advice for members who respond to ProfNet queries?

Offer a sentence, or three, giving the reporter an idea of your client’s position on the topic. Just saying so-and-so is a psychologist with 20 years experience doesn’t show much. But, if you say all that and add a short paragraph outlining where the expert stands on the subject the reporter is covering, the writer can better decide if the expert may be a good fit.

What type of experts do you prefer to work with?

I’ve yet to find any group of experts off-putting. It’s less about the type of expert, and more about the person. Some experts approach their pitches better than others (ex: reaching out when you aren’t well versed on the topic doesn’t really benefit you, or the writer).

Can you tell us about your favorite or most challenging assignment?

Challenges on the front-side (AKA during the reporting) are often mitigated by a good editor. I’ve been really, really lucky to have amazing editors.

The challenges I notice are those that happen after the story runs -- the ones you don’t expect. Many years ago I wrote about laser hair removal and the art/illustration was a (modest) two-piece bathing suit hanging on a clothesline. People declared me immoral and disgusting and called for my job (they didn’t think we should write about hair removal, especially of the bikini line-kind). Another time, I blogged about a roadside memorial, and had readers threaten me physically. Death threats happen, and they don’t get less scary. I’ve been criticized for everything from my appearance to my views to the clothes I wear or the car I drive to the topics I cover or how well I write. While you can certainly “shut out” those views, you don’t want readers to feel you don’t respect their position, or that they’re being ignored. Finding a balance is tough, and often challenging.

How do use social media at work?

Social media is excellent for crowdsourcing, understanding what interests readers most and even finding expert sources or story ideas.

If someone want to contact you, what’s the best way to do so?

Email:

Twitter -- @JustKristi

Facebook -- Facebook.com/JustKristiOnline

Website -- JustKristi.com

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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Media 411: Are Corporate Writers Journalists?

What is a journalist? Is it a newspaper columnist? A TV news anchor? A radio news producer? An investigative reporter? Although the media industry has changed significantly in the past 10 years, our vision of what describes a journalist may still be the same. In present day 2015, journalists can report and/or write for a variety of outlets, and one gaining popularity is writing for a company news site, a.k.a. “brand journalism.”

While I’m not a fan of using titles, I’ll nonetheless use this one just for the sake of context. Brands are realizing the potential in reaching clients or potential customers via their own news sites and are investing in creating their own newsrooms. Whether it’s to educate people about the company, the industry or get sales leads, this is a new way to spread the word.

Some might say that people writing for these company news sites are not journalists and are instead marketers, but many of those being hired by companies to write their content are legitimate journalists. Who better to tell a story? People love a good story, so connecting with customers in this way makes great sense, especially if a journalist is known for their trade.

It’s no secret news outlets are shrinking and shutting down. As I write this, two media companies announced this afternoon that they’re shrinking their staff. Where are these journalists to go if they can’t retire? They can’t all become freelancers. Some will switch careers and some will likely work for a company as a “corporate journalist.”

But not all journalists have to accept the trend. There are journalists who may not like the idea of writing for a company news site -- and that’s alright. Some just may not like writing or developing content for a company that isn’t associated with media. It’s not a newspaper, online news site or a TV news station, so they’re not comfortable with it.

What I’m trying to convey is that we can’t judge journalists who go from working on hard news stories to working on a company news website. We all need to work, and no one should be judging someone on their choice of employment, especially if traditional journalist roles are becoming tougher to find. Whether or not you’re for or against the situation, let’s give these folks a break.

What’s your opinion?

Please let me know in the comments section or feel free to contact me directly: evelyn.tipacti@prnewswire.com

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. All you have to do is fill out a quick form telling us what you’re looking for, your deadline, and how you want to be contacted, and we’ll send it to the appropriate experts in our network. The best part? It’s free! Get started here: Send a query.

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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Thu, 19 Mar 2015 15:09:13 -0500 http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/03/19/media_411:_are_corporate_writers_journalists http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/03/19/media_411:_are_corporate_writers_journalists

What is a journalist? Is it a newspaper columnist? A TV news anchor? A radio news producer? An investigative reporter? Although the media industry has changed significantly in the past 10 years, our vision of what describes a journalist may still be the same. In present day 2015, journalists can report and/or write for a variety of outlets, and one gaining popularity is writing for a company news site, a.k.a. “brand journalism.”

While I’m not a fan of using titles, I’ll nonetheless use this one just for the sake of context. Brands are realizing the potential in reaching clients or potential customers via their own news sites and are investing in creating their own newsrooms. Whether it’s to educate people about the company, the industry or get sales leads, this is a new way to spread the word.

Some might say that people writing for these company news sites are not journalists and are instead marketers, but many of those being hired by companies to write their content are legitimate journalists. Who better to tell a story? People love a good story, so connecting with customers in this way makes great sense, especially if a journalist is known for their trade.

It’s no secret news outlets are shrinking and shutting down. As I write this, two media companies announced this afternoon that they’re shrinking their staff. Where are these journalists to go if they can’t retire? They can’t all become freelancers. Some will switch careers and some will likely work for a company as a “corporate journalist.”

But not all journalists have to accept the trend. There are journalists who may not like the idea of writing for a company news site -- and that’s alright. Some just may not like writing or developing content for a company that isn’t associated with media. It’s not a newspaper, online news site or a TV news station, so they’re not comfortable with it.

What I’m trying to convey is that we can’t judge journalists who go from working on hard news stories to working on a company news website. We all need to work, and no one should be judging someone on their choice of employment, especially if traditional journalist roles are becoming tougher to find. Whether or not you’re for or against the situation, let’s give these folks a break.

What’s your opinion?

Please let me know in the comments section or feel free to contact me directly: evelyn.tipacti@prnewswire.com

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. All you have to do is fill out a quick form telling us what you’re looking for, your deadline, and how you want to be contacted, and we’ll send it to the appropriate experts in our network. The best part? It’s free! Get started here: Send a query.

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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PR 411: Instagram Popular for Brands How many of you are using Instagram to help boost your brand’s visibility? If you're not using it yet, consider the benefits it's providing others.

Adweek published a report earlier this week on the popularity of Instagram and the incredible success brands like Christian Louboutin have had using it and why brands are starting to post more there than on Facebook.

Here’s Garett Sloane’s report:

Instagram is luring brands away from Facebook, according to a new report from research firm L2, which found that brands now post more content on the photo-sharing app.

The reason? Brands know everything they post on the platform will appear in fans' feeds,the study says. But on Facebook, if brands don't pay to promote their posts, much of their content doesn't appear in followers' News Feeds. That trend is turning Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, into a growing marketing force. 

The report outlines how brands have been building their followings on the app, which recently topped 300 million monthly users. Facebook does not comment on Instagram's growth outside of official announcements. However, considering the Instagram audience was 100 million two years ago, that tripling of users approaches Facebook's biggest leaps. Facebook went from 100 million to 300 million in an even shorter time span.

Another reason Instagram is a marketing darling at the moment is it's attracting...

To real the complete story, please click here.

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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Thu, 12 Mar 2015 14:52:24 -0500 http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/03/12/pr_411:_instagram_popular_for_brands http://www.profnetconnect.com/evelyntipacti/blog/2015/03/12/pr_411:_instagram_popular_for_brands How many of you are using Instagram to help boost your brand’s visibility? If you're not using it yet, consider the benefits it's providing others.

Adweek published a report earlier this week on the popularity of Instagram and the incredible success brands like Christian Louboutin have had using it and why brands are starting to post more there than on Facebook.

Here’s Garett Sloane’s report:

Instagram is luring brands away from Facebook, according to a new report from research firm L2, which found that brands now post more content on the photo-sharing app.

The reason? Brands know everything they post on the platform will appear in fans' feeds,the study says. But on Facebook, if brands don't pay to promote their posts, much of their content doesn't appear in followers' News Feeds. That trend is turning Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, into a growing marketing force. 

The report outlines how brands have been building their followings on the app, which recently topped 300 million monthly users. Facebook does not comment on Instagram's growth outside of official announcements. However, considering the Instagram audience was 100 million two years ago, that tripling of users approaches Facebook's biggest leaps. Facebook went from 100 million to 300 million in an even shorter time span.

Another reason Instagram is a marketing darling at the moment is it's attracting...

To real the complete story, please click here.

Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

0 Comments - Leave a Comment
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