Angela Smith

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    • Member Type(s): Content Publisher
      Communications Professional
    • Title:Assistant Account Executive
    • Organization:InkHouse Media + Marketing
    • Area of Expertise:Public relations
    •  
    • Member:ProfNet

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    From the Alternative Medicine Cabinet to Times Square

    Wednesday, July 2, 2014, 4:41 PM [Success Stories]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Congratulations to ProfNet member Dr. Kathy Gruver who was featured in Times Square as part of our Facebook promotion! Dr. Gruver is an award-winning writer, speaker, educator and practitioner. She is the author of “The Alternative Medicine Cabinet,” and has contributed to numerous publications including Glamour, NPR and Men’s Health to name a few.

    Dr. Gruver shared her success stories on our Facebook page as part of our monthly promotion, whereby we choose our favorite success story from our Facebook wall each month and that person gets his/her picture on the Reuters sign in Times Square.

    Thanks to ProfNet, Dr. Gruver was quoted in a Health.com article titled, “10 Things You Should Never Do When You’re Angry.” This article also appeared in Time.com and FOXNews.com. The story was then translated into about 15 different languages, giving her constant media notifications that her quotes were being read in different countries around the world.

    “I initially hesitated to sign up with ProfNet. I was using some of the free services and wondered why I would need yet another. But wow! I have had so many amazing opportunities from ProfNet -- TV, radio, print, national and regional outlets. Well worth the money and yet another resource I can use to get my message of health out. And a billboard in Times Square! Yeah, it was worth it!” she said.

    Want to see your picture in Times Square? It’s easy:

    Step 1: “Like” our Facebook page (go to www.facebook.com/ProfNetOnFB -- not the FB logo on the top of this page).

    Step 2: Share your best success story on our wall. 

    That’s it!  

    Make sure to post your success stories there every month, and you could be next!

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    ProfNet Success Story: Dr. Kathy Gruver, The Alternative Medicine Cabinet

    Thursday, June 12, 2014, 2:04 PM [Success Stories]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    I recently caught up with ProfNet member, Kathy Gruver, Ph.D, an award-winning author, speaker, educator and practitioner, to talk about some of her recent media hits. Dr. Gruver is the author of “The Alternative Medicine Cabinet,” and has contributed to numerous publications including Glamour, NPR, and Men’s Health to name a few. She has even produced an instructional massage DVD.

    One way that she continues to gain media exposure is through ProfNet. Recently, she was quoted in a Health.com article titled, “10 Things You Should Never Do When You’re Angry.” This article also appeared in Time.com and FOXNews.com.

    I wanted to hear some  tips for how to successfully respond to reporters’ queries straight from the source. Here’s what she had to say:

    How do you choose which ProfNet queries to respond to each day?

    I scan every query title and really try to determine if I'm going to be a good source for the reporter. My husband is a writer so I respect the info and requirements that they ask for. Sometimes the queries have more of a health bent, but sometimes they come more in the form of technology or business. Since one of my areas is stress, that can apply to so many different fields and subjects. I look for words that indicate the query could use someone like me. It's a long process some days.

    What do you include in a typical response?

    I always include what in my background would show best why I would be a good source. Maybe for one it's massage but another it's nutrition or GMOs, or the fact that I do flying trapeze. I pull from my education and experience to give the reporter the best aspect of myself that fits the story. I always put a link to my website for more info and really try to customize every response.

    Do you have tips for PR people for responding to ProfNet queries?

    Stay on topic. The few times I've sent out queries, I've gotten some really crazy off topic pitches. It's frustrating and time consuming. I think it's ok to offer, say expert input if they are looking for a "real person" in case it could fit the story, but some people really push the limits of what is on and off topic. And be real in your response. If someone is looking for a scientist to talk about GMOs, that's not me. I will offer my expertise, but be very clear in what my background is and why I would be a good source. Be true to yourself and honest in your responses.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    ProfNet Success Story: Elaine Iandoli, New York Institute of Technology

    Thursday, April 17, 2014, 9:20 AM [Success Stories]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    After sharing her ProfNet success story with us, we caught up with Elaine Iandoli of the New York Institute of Technology to get some tips for how to successfully respond to reporters’ queries. Check out what he had to say:

    ProfNet Query that led to success:

    Link to story: Matt Twomey from CNBC posted a query looking for experts to comment on protecting U.S. coastal infrastructure amid climate change. I passed along the query to New York Institute of Technology graduate Daniel Horn, who co-founded a group called Operation Resilient Long Island (ORLI) following Hurricane Sandy’s devastation along our coast. Dan was quoted and he presented information about ORLI’s global competition for resilient design. Another plus: the story was posted on Dan’s birthday! www.cnbc.com/id/101301645

    How do you choose which ProfNet queries to respond to each day?

    New York Institute of Technology has numerous experts in a range of subject areas and many faculty members are eager to share their knowledge with journalists and the public. Even smaller, less well-known outlets can yield positive results in terms of interviews and exposure for NYIT and can lead to new relationships. I focus on queries about breaking news or the key areas of NYIT expertise: medicine, health, cybersecurity, career services, and architecture.

    What do you include in a typical response?

    I advise our faculty experts to answer the query with bullet points and ready-to-use quotes, plus some additional quotes that the journalist might want to consider (perhaps as a question they haven’t asked in the query). I advise faculty, students, and staff to consider their natural voice as they answer questions and provide information. I also link to our expert’s profile on our website. Depending on the query, I may link to NYIT news releases that provide additional useful background or to previous media appearances so the journalist has a full background.

    Do you have tips for PR people for responding to ProfNet queries?

    Guide clients in providing succinct, to-the-point answers. Encourage dynamic, rich answers that avoid flowery, corporate, or academic language. Have clients read their answers aloud to hear how they sound; consider asking journalists to reach out any time for additional information on news stories for the future.

    Additional Comments:

    ProfNet has proven valuable to New York Institute of Technology. I’ve built relationships with some journalists, and I’m happy that our experts have had the opportunity to share views and insights with the public on a variety of topics as a result of ProfNet. Even if our experts aren’t included for a story, their answers often provide me with helpful information I can use in other written materials or pitches. Additionally, responding to queries provides our faculty with good practice in media relations.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    ProfNet Success Story: Brad Brown, St. Louis College of Pharmacy

    Thursday, March 20, 2014, 4:10 PM [Success Stories]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    After sharing his ProfNet success story with us on our Facebook page, we caught up with Brad Brown, director of public relations at St. Louis College of Pharmacy to get some tips for how to successfully respond to reporters’ queries. Check out what he had to say:

    ProfNet Query that led to success:


    Link to Story: The Health Crisis in Your Cabinet by Carol Sorgen

    1) How do u chose which ProfNet queries to respond to each day?

    I look at all of the health-related stories to see if one of our pharmacists on faculty has an expertise in that area. Sometimes reporters are unaware of a pharmacist’s education, experience, and knowledge about a wide variety of health related topics. If something seems like a possibility I do a quick search of the reporter to see past stories they’ve written, and also of the outlet to get a feel for the type of stories they publish. I’m also very selective. If someone is writing for a magazine or website for a specific health care discipline, they’re unlikely to want to hear from others.

    2) What do you include in a typical response?

    I usually include my expert’s academic and work-related qualifications. My responses are generally no more than three or four sentences. In cases where the reporter didn’t realize a pharmacist would be helpful to their story, I share information about how the pharmacy perspective could help their article. If the topic is something my expert has commented on in the past, I may include a link or a mention about their previous work.

    3) Do you have tips for PR people for responding to ProfNet queries?

    Respond quickly and be brief. I know if I don’t hear anything within a couple of hours the reporter has gone another direction.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    ProfNet Success Story: Philippa Gamse

    Thursday, February 20, 2014, 11:40 AM [Success Stories]
    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    After sharing her ProfNet success story with us on our Facebook page, we caught up with Philippa Gamse, president of Websites That Win International, to get some tips for how to successfully respond to reporters’ queries. Check out what she had to say:

    ProfNet Query that led to success: 






    Link to the story:

    Advertisers See Huge Potential in Mobile Marketing by Gail Dutton

    How do you choose which ProfNet queries to respond to each day?

    I only respond to queries that I know I can speak to, since the goal is to showcase my expertise. I also try to ensure that if I’m going to push back on the writer’s premise (which I think can be valuable sometimes), that my argument is still relevant. I was very lucky once that a prominent journalist took the time to “slap my wrists” about a pitch that he thought was badly off-topic, and he warned me that if I did this again, he’d blacklist me. It was a really good wake-up call.

    What do you include in a typical response?

    Firstly, my key credentials which establish expertise or positioning for that query. For example, sometimes reporters specifically ask for academics, in which case I’ll introduce myself as a Professor of Digital Marketing, as opposed to mentioning my consulting company. If they ask for an author, I’ll lead with my book ("42 Rules for a Web Presence That Wins"), and a few of its most well-known endorsers, such as Guy Kawasaki.

    In the actual content of the pitch, I’ve learned through experience to write exactly as I’d like to be quoted. Sometimes journalists just take my copy and use it, even without letting me know, so it’s important to bear that possibility in mind. I try to use bold text and bullet points so that my key points stand out and can be easily extracted.

    Do you have tips for PR people for responding to ProfNet queries?

    I’ve actually used ProfNet as a source for leads myself when I’m writing, so I have some experience of this. I really hate when PR people send a pitch saying “You must talk to my expert – he’s awesome and he knows everything about this topic . . .” I have no idea what the “expert” might say, what their angle might be – and I’m being asked to interview them on this basis, and potentially waste my time. This feels very disrespectful. So my tip is that if you’re pitching for someone else, you need to provide a really good level of detail about how they can help.

    Additional Comments:

    I’d also like to give a shout-out to Dan Janal, of PR Leads. It was actually one of his tips which motivated me to think of my own individual angle for this story, instead of assuming that other experts had already sent in all the obvious responses. Dan is an amazing resource and font of wisdom for successful PR, and I highly recommend him to your readers.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com


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