Angela Smith

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    • Member Type(s): Content Publisher
      Communications Professional
    • Title:Assistant Account Executive
    • Organization:InkHouse Media + Marketing
    • Area of Expertise:Public relations
    •  
    • Member:ProfNet

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    I Don’t Like It, I Love it: Facebook Tests ‘Reactions’

    Friday, October 16, 2015, 5:21 PM [General]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    Last week, Facebook announced that it would be testing Reactions, a new set of empathy buttons designed for when clicking “Like” just doesn’t cut it or feels just plain awkward. This
    announcement comes after years of speculation that a “thumbs down” button might wiggle its way into the social networking platform.

    With nearly half of Facebook users accessing the social network primarily on their mobile devices, it became necessary to develop a quick way for people to express a wider range of emotions, especially when they’re on the go and less likely to type a comment. According to Facebook’s chief product officeChris Cox, the company studied which comments and reactions were most commonly and universally expressed on the site, then worked to design an experience around them.

    These Reactions — which come in the form of six emoji consisting of love, laughter, happiness, shock, sadness and anger — allow us Facebook fans to communicate a wider range of reactions to the variety of, maybe, less likeable content that shows up in our newsfeeds.

    So far, only Facebook users in Ireland and Spain have access to these new features, these folks comprising smaller test groups with fewer international connections. But, fear not, Facebook friend, the feedback from this pilot will help improve the overall experience for the rest of us when it comes time to roll out worldwide.

    But what does all this mean for businesses and marketers? For one thing, the access to more granular data will provide better engagement insights revealing what types of messaging and content drives specific audience emotions so that they can work to create more of what’s working.

    What’s not to Like about that?

    [This post originally appeared on InkHouse's blog, Inklings]

    Farewell, ProfNet. Thanks for the Memories!

    Thursday, November 13, 2014, 9:41 AM [General]
    4.1 (2 Ratings)

    As the saying goes, all good things must come to an end. Today marks my last day as a community services specialist with ProfNet. During my time here, I’ve not only had the opportunity to learn from some of the top experts in the media and communications industry, but I’ve had the chance to work alongside some pretty talented people.

    Without getting too mushy, I want to thank my ProfNet ladies for two years of great memories. Now who is going to laugh at my jokes (did someone pay you all to do that?), taste-test my cupcakes, and remind on a daily basis that “teamwork is dream work”? To Maria, Polina and Evelyn: I am truly going to miss working with you all!

    After taking a look back at all of the events I’ve attended and the interviews I’ve conducted, I came up with a list of my favorite posts. Without further ado, here are my top 10 most memorable posts:  

    I am excited for this next chapter in my career as I join Boston’s InkHouse PR team. I look forward to continuing to learn about the industry from such an experienced team of public relations professionals, and I hope that many of our paths will cross in the future.

    For everyone who I’ve met along the way, I hope to keep in touch! Don’t be a stranger: @Angela_Smith11

    Upcoming #ConnectChat: Women in the Workplace

    Friday, September 12, 2014, 1:50 PM [General]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    What is the best advice for women who are embarking on a career in communications? How about professionals who are in leadership roles? What are the traits that all successful women today should possess?

    These are all questions that Lori Green, a senior partner and director of content for Maxus, will answer in our next #ConnectChat. As an experienced expert in her field, Green will be sharing her best tips for women in the workplace.

    To participate in the chat, join us on Twitter on Tuesday, Sept. 16, from 3 to 4:30 p.m. EDT and follow the #ConnectChat hashtag to follow the conversation between @lorip1025, @ProfNet and the rest of the chat participants.

    If you cannot join us on the day of the chat, you can find a recap on ProfNet Connect the following day. We hope you will join us!

    About Lori Green:

    Lori Greene is a proven multi-platform content executive highly proficient in all aspects of media including social, mobile, broadband, television, digital, and print as well as digital ad sales. She is the senior partner and director of content for Maxus, the world’s fastest growing ad agency. She teaches digital content strategies, content marketing, social media, and more at New York University, Institute of Culinary Education, Brooklyn College, and others. She is also is vice president of programming for New York Women in Communications and ran content and digital for History, Bio, BBC America, and Court TV.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    Upcoming #ConnectChat: What to Do When 'It' Hits the Fan: Crisis Communications in the Digital Age

    Thursday, May 22, 2014, 2:50 PM [General]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    If your company were to experience a crisis tomorrow, would you be prepared? Is there a concrete plan in place, or would your “plan” be to cross every bridge when you get there? When it comes to crisis communications, is tried and true better than shiny and new?

    These are all questions that media training and crisis communications professional Gerard Braud will answer in our next #ConnectChat. As an experienced expert in the field, Braud will be providing his best tips for what to do when “it” hits the fan – especially now that we live in a digital age.

    To participate in the chat, join us on Twitter on Tuesday, May 27, from 3 to 4:30 p.m. EDT and follow the #ConnectChat hashtag to follow the conversation between @gbraud@ProfNet and the rest of the chat participants.

    If you cannot join us on the day of the chat, you can find a recap on ProfNet Connect the following day. We hope you will join us!

    About Gerard Braud:

    Gerard Braud, CSP, Fellow IEC (Jared Bro) is an international expert, coach, trainer, author and speaker, who has worked with organizations on five continents. Known as the guy to call when it hits the fan, he is widely regarded as an expert in crisis communications and media issues. He has been active in the field of communications since 1979. For 15 years, he worked in print, radio and television as a front line journalist, on the scene of every type of disaster imaginable. His affiliate reports have been seen around the world on NBC, CBS, CNN and the BBC. Since 1994 Braud has specialized in helping organizations communicate more effectively through media training, crisis communications plans, and employee-manager training. Read more about Braud in his bio: tinyurl.com/okxjzzv

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com

    Social Media Crash Course: Write Tweets People Read

    Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 2:58 PM [General]
    0 (0 Ratings)

    The American Society of Journalists and Authors (ASJA) hosted its annual conference last week at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York. Over the next few days, we’ll post recaps of some of the panels we were able to attend.

    Yesterday, we posted highlights from “Sassy Sentences and Wicked Good Prose: How to Craft Better Writing,” in which San Francisco-based journalist Constance Hale shared her tips for perking up your writing in surprising ways.

    Today, we're covering a session titled, "Social Media Crash Course: Write Tweets People Read." Following are some of the highlights:

    Crafting your thoughts in 140 characters or less can be a challenge. Should you be funny? Informative? Should you retweet? Reply? Favorite? The list goes on.

    In an interactive workshop moderated by Rae Padilla, I heard from a panel of people who write tweets that actually get read – and retweeted. Check out some of the things that each of them had to say.

    Jessica Misener, senior editor at BuzzFeed | @jessmisener

    • Twitter is instrumental in developing a voice and a character. Misener writes in lower case and without periods – but it’s all about what works best for you.
    • The No. 1 thing you can do on Twitter is be funny. Participate in what’s going on. For example, if it’s the Super Bowl then tweet about that with a mix of funny and topical.
    • If you’re not funny, you can always take screenshots of funny things your see around the Internet. (A good place to find that can be in the comments section of Reddit.  
    • Don’t overuse hashtags. Misener only really uses hashtags ironically.

    Leslie Poston, author of “Social Media Metrics for Dummies” and co-author of “Twitter for Dummies” | @Leslie

    • As a writer, you can tell a lot about your story in 140 words or less.
    • Find your voice (it’s half the fun of Twitter) but don’t stress too much about it. Remember, it’s *just* Twitter.
    • If you’re not funny you can fake it. “OH” means “overheard,” so if you hear something that is worth sharing, then you can tweet that.
    • Tweets about topical news depend on timing.
    • As far as self-promotion, it’s sometimes better to keep a link to your work in your bio and keep your tweets to your thoughts. A good example to follow would be Margaret Atwood, who tweets about issues instead of promoting her own books.
    • Fact-check before you tweet.
    • A good example of a journalist to follow is @acarvin

    Michael Roston, social media editor at The New York Times | @michaelroston

    • Follow Twitter etiquette: Twitter is like a cocktail party – sometimes you start a conversation, sometimes you contribute and sometimes you just listen.
    • Have a set of patterns and habits. For example, tweet a greeting at the beginning of a shift. For Roston, he’d read the news throughout his night shift and then have a tweet listing “the first thing you should read today” for everyone just waking up in the morning.
    • Avoid shoehorning things on Twitter that should belong on Facebook or Instagram.
    • Don’t overuse hashtags.
    • Regarding self-promotion: Build a community on Twitter so that when it's time to self-promote people will be happy for you.

    Whether you're a reporter, blogger, author or other content creator, ProfNet can help you with your search for expert sources. You can send a query to tens of thousands of experts and PR agents, search the more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email -- all for free! Need help getting started? Email us at profnet@profnet.com


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